Texas Sports Hall of Fame

The Texas Sports Hall of Fame currently has 352 inductees. Men and women who have brought lasting fame and honor have been honored since 1951 when Tris Speaker became our first inductee. 

Hall of Famers

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Name:  
Adams, K.S. "Bud" Jr.
City:  
Bartlesville, OK
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
2009 marks the 50th anniversary for K.S. "Bud" Adams Jr. as the Founder, Owner, Chairman of the Board, President and CEO of the Tennessee Titans (formerly the Houston Oilers). Adams was one of the pioneers who brought professional football to Texas in 1960. On August 3, 1959 Adams hosted a press conference in his office, along with Lamar Hunt, to announce the formation of the American Football League. The eight original AFL owners, known as "The Foolish Club" for trying to compete with the NFL, eventually forced a merger between the two leagues in 1970. The Oilers were the AFL's first great team playing in four championship games (1960, 1961, 1962 & 1967) and winning the title twice (1960 & 1961). In 1968 Adams' Oilers made professional football history by becoming the first team to play its games indoors at the Astrodome. During the "Luv Ya Blue" era under Coach Bum Phillips running back Earl Campbell, the Oilers came within one victory of the Super Bowl two times. In the Run-and-Shoot era with Warren Moon, the Oilers made the playoffs a league-best seven consecutive years. Since moving his franchise to Nashville in 1997, the renamed Titans played in their first Super Bowl. Adams was also part owner of the Houston Astros in 1962 & the owner of the Houston Mavericks basketball team in the American Basketball Association from 1967 to 1969. A dedicated philanthropist, Adams and his late wife Nancy have donated millions of dollars to charities in Texas, Tennessee and across the nation. Adams is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2009.
Name:  
Aikman, Troy
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Troy Aikman played quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys from 1989-2000. The first player selected in the 1989 NFL Draft, Troy became the first rookie quarterback since 1969 (Roger Staubach) to start a season opener. He played in six Pro Bowls – (1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1994, 1995, 1996) and was the third QB in NFL history to win 3 Super Bowls (1992, 1993, 1995). His career totals include 32,942 passing yards and 165 TDs. He was the MVP of Super Bowl XXVII, when Dallas beat the Buffalo Bills 52-17 and completed 22 of 30 passes. Aikman is the all-time Dallas Cowboys leader in passing yards, touchdowns, completions and attempts. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.
Name:  
Akers, Fred
City:  
Blytheville, Arkansas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
2016
Akers served as the head football coach at the Texas from 1977-1986 posting a stellar record of 86-31-2 that included a pair of SWC championships in 1977 and 1983. He also guided the Longhorns to nine bowl games in 10 seasons. In 1977 Akers installed the I formation and more importantly, moved Earl Campbell from fullback to tailback. The Longhorns started the season 11-0 and climbed to the No. 1 ranking in the polls. Although they lost their bid for a national championship to Notre Dame in the Cotton Bowl, Earl Campbell topped off his historic season by winning the 1977 Heisman Trophy. Akers followed the spectacular 1977 season with nine consecutive winning seasons and nine bowl invitations in a row. In 1978 the Longhorns were 9-3 and finished the year ranked 9th nationally. Texas matched that record in 1979 and earned a No. 12 national ranking. In 1981 Akers’ team had a 10-1-1 record that included a 14-12 upset of No. 3 Alabama in the Cotton Bowl that led to a No. 2 ranking for Texas. Akers’ teams also had three 10-win seasons, four Top-10 finishes in final polls. He coached two Lombardi Trophy winners - Kenneth Sims and Tony Degrate, and Outland Trophy winner in Brad Shearer along with 48 other players who earned All-SWC honors.
Name:  
Aldrich, Charles
City:  
Temple
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Charles "Ki" Aldrich has been called one of the greatest defensive centers ever to play football. At Temple High School in 1934, Aldrich won All-State honors as a center. Co-captain for the Texas Christian University Horned Frogs in 1938, Aldrich was named consensus All-America as he led TCU to a 10-0 record and the national championship. An offensive and defensive center, Aldrich played for the Chicago Cardinals during the 1939 and 1940 seasons. From 1941 to 1943, he played for the Washington Redskins and then served two years in the U.S. Navy. After the war, he returned to the Redskins and played through the 1947 season. Aldrich averaged an incredible 50 minutes of playing time per game during his professional football career. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1960.
Name:  
Allen, Larry
City:  
Los Angeles, California
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
2016
NFL Hall of Famer Larry Allen is arguably one of the greatest offensive linemen in Dallas Cowboys’ history. He quickly rose from an unknown player at Division II Sonoma State University to one of the Dallas Cowboys’ best offensive linemen as a consistent piece of the starting unit for the next 12 years from 1994-2006. He was the best player on a Cowboys’ offensive line that was routinely recognized as the most dominant in the NFL. Allen played a critical role in the Dallas Cowboys winning its third Super Bowl victory in four years in January 1996. He helped pave the way for Emmitt Smith to set Dallas single-season records for rushing yards (1,773) and TDs (25) in 1995, and eventually set NFL marks with 18,355 rushing yards and 164 rushing TDs. In Allen’s 14-year NFL career he was named to 11 Pro Bowls, was recognized as an All-Pro seven times and was named to the NFL All-Decade team in the 1990s and 2000s. He was inducted into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor on Nov. 6, 2011, and later was voted into the NFL Hall of Fame on Feb. 2, 2013.
Name:  
Allison, Wilmer
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Tennis
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Within 10 years of picking up a tennis racket for the first time, Wilmer Allison was ranked among the world's best players. He joined the University of Texas tennis squad in 1925 as the last man on the team. By his sophomore year, he was Southwest Conference singles champion and the national collegiate singles champion. He later teamed with John Van Ryn and twice won the doubles title at Wimbledon and was singles runner-up in 1930. He was also a member of the Davis Cup team from 1928 to 1937. In 1935, Allison won the U.S. national singles title. Allison succeeded Dr. D.A. Penick as tennis coach at the University of Texas in 1957 and served 16 seasons, developing SWC team champions four times and runners-up on four other occasions. In honor of Allison, the "Penick Courts" at the University of Texas were renamed the "Penick-Allison Courts" in 1977. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1957.
Name:  
Andaya, Shawn
City:  
Lodi, CA
School:  
Sport:  
Softball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Shawn Andaya is a college softball legend. In her four years at Texas A&M, she was a three-time All-American and the winning pitcher for the Aggies in the 1987 national championship game. Born and raised in Lodi, California, Andaya made her mark at Lodi High School, receiving the school’s outstanding athlete award for the 1982-83 school year. She was also honored as Lodi’s 1983 female athlete of the year. Andaya’s experience on and off the softball field at Texas A&M are cherished memories. The pitcher posted a 114-28 record with 10 saves in her four years, setting an NCAA career record with 1,234 strikes. During her career she led the Aggies to World Series appearances and broke the record for most innings pitched in a single Women’s College World Series (WCWS) game with 25. The record is still held by Andaya today. As a freshman, Andaya won her first World Series game with an RBI in the 25th inning. One of her career highlight was throwing a perfect game against UCLA in a WCWS elimination game in ’87. The Aggies defeated UCLA twice that year to earn the NCAA title. “My most memorable moment from A&M is winning the national championship, of course.” Andaya said. “I also have two memorable moments of playing in national championship games and losing, but to be able to end my career on top was really special. Softball wasn’t an Olympic sport at that time—I was done with softball. Not many people can say that they finished their sport on top, achieving the highest pinnacle their sport has to offer.” In 2006, the Aggie All-American was selected to be part of the NCAA’s 25th Anniversary Women’s College World Series team. In 1992, she became a member of the Texas A&M Athletic Hall of Fame, and this year she will become the first softball player inducted into Texas Sports Hall of Fame and the 25th member associated with Texas A&M. She joins the ranks of Aggie inductees such as John David Crow, Gene Stallings and Class of 2011 member Gary Blair. “It’s pretty amazing to be inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame, especially being the first softball player inducted,” Andaya said. “That says a lot. I can’t even begin to tell you how great this honor is. I came from California to Texas to play on a national championship team, and to now be inducted into the state’s Hall of Fame feels pretty remarkable.” Andaya left Texas after graduating from A&M, but returned to Bryan-College Station in 1992 to serve as Assistant Coach for the Aggies. She left coaching in 1996 and now works for non-profit organizations. Andaya and her husband Al Pulliam, have two boys, A.J. and Trey, who both enjoy playing sports. Twenty seven years after the Aggies championship victory, Andaya doesn’t boast about her collegiate success, but remembers how much it has shaped her life. “When you accomplish something like that, you feel like you can do just about anything,” she said. “Everything I have learned from sports I have mimicked in real life – trying to be a leader, the importance of dedication. Through sports, it was evident that hard work pays off and you can accomplish your goal.” She was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2011.
Name:  
Anderson, Donny
City:  
Stinnett
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Donny Anderson's success began at Stinnett High School, where he earned 12 letters in three sports and was named all-state, all-southern and all-america in football. At Texas Tech, the 6’2”, 210 lb. halfback was named All-Southwest Conference three times (1963-1965) and All-America twice (1964-1965). In Anderson’s senior season at Texas Tech, they finished second in the Southwest Conference and carried an 8-2 record to the 1965 Gator Bowl where he was named MVP. Anderson was a first round choice for both the Green Bay Packers and the Houston Oilers, but signed with Green Bay in 1966 for the largest rookie contract in NFL history. He excelled as a runner, receiver, and punter and rushed for 4,696 yards and scored 55 touchdowns during his NFL career. Anderson was a member of the Packers’ 1966 and 1967 championship teams that won Super Bowls I and II. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1984.
Name:  
Anderson, Frank
City:  
College Station
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Frank Anderson's success story as an athlete started at Tennessee's White County High School and continued at Brandon Training School and Mississippi College before he began a remarkable coaching career. He served as coach and director of athletics at Mississippi College before being lured to Texas A&M in 1920 by Dana X. Bible, his prep college coach. Anderson was the head track and field coach at Texas A&M from 1922-35 and from 1946-57. Anderson's teams won nine track and field championships and nine cross-country titles. He also served as a dean, a commandant of the corps, and mayor of College Station. Three of his athletes (Art Harden, Walter "Buddy" Davis and Darrow Hopper) earned Olympic medals. Anderson was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1975.
Name:  
Andrews, Leta
City:  
Granbury, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Leta Andrews began her illustrious career as a player at Granbury High School when she and her sister, Shirley, led the Lady Pirates to the state tournament in 1954 and 1955. Her coaching career began in 1962 at Tolar High School and included stops at Gustine, Comanche (1965-1976) and Corpus Christi Calallen (1980-1992), where she won a Class 4A state title in 1990. Andrews is currently the coach of her alma mater Granbury (1976-1980, 1992-present). On Dec. 9, 2005, Andrews won her 1,218th game to break Charleston, Tenn., coach Jim Smiddy’s record as the winningest girls high school coach in the nation. Five years later, when Granbury defeated Midlothian, 62-43, on Dec. 7, 2010, Andrews became the nation’s winningest coach for girls or boys, surpassing longtime Fort Worth Dunbar boys coach Robert Hughes with her 1,334th career win. Andrews ended the 2011-12 season with an overall career mark of 1,375-311 in 50 seasons. Her teams have been to 16 state Final Fours and have averaged 28 wins per season. Some of Andrews’ honors include selection into the Texas High School Basketball Hall of Fame and being selected to coach the 2004 McDonald’s High School All-America Game. She also was selected as the Walt Disney National Teacher of the Year in 1993. Andrews was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2007, the same year she earned the NHSCA’s National Coach of the Year award. Andrews was a 2010 inductee into the Women’s Basketball HOF, located in Knoxville, Tenn. She has been featured on CBS Evening News and written about in The New York Times, and was honored by the Texas Legislature on March 2, 2011. She told the Dallas Morning News in 2010 that along with winning the state tile, one of her greatest career highlights was getting to coach her three daughters — Lindy, Sissy and Lisa — who all were all-state players in high school and played at the University of Texas.
Name:  
Atz, Jake
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
John Jacob “Jake” Atz began his baseball career in 1896 as a player in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley League. When his team won the playoffs, the 17-year-old Atz won $18 in bonus money. He later played for the Chicago White Sox until 1910 when he intentionally took a pitch on the hip to reach first base. It crippled him, ending his major-league playing career. By 1916, he was managing the Fort Worth Cats and starting a legendary stint in the Texas League. Atz remained a Texas League manager for 22 years and had a record of seven consecutive first-place finishes (1919-25), six consecutive pennants (1920-25), and five Dixie Series titles (1920, 1921, 1923-25). He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1963.
Name:  
Bagwell, Jeff
City:  
Boston, MA
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
JEFF BAGWELL. Jeff Bagwell was the first Houston Astro to win the National League (NL) Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player Awards. In 1994 he became only the third consensus National League MVP since the honor was established in 1931. During 15 seasons with the team (1991-2005) he has a .297 career average, 2,314 hits, 449 homeruns and 1,529 RBI’s. A four-time All-Star, in 1994 he also won a Gold Glove Award at first base for his defensive prowess. Bagwell and longtime teammate Craig Biggio led the Astros to four NL Central titles in 1997, 1998, 1999 & 2001. In 2004 the Astros captured the NL Wild Card and won their first playoff series ever by defeating the Atlanta Braves in the NL Divisional Playoffs. The Astros’ 2004 season ended with a loss to the St. Louis Cardinals in game 7 of the National League Championship Series. Although they lost to the Chicago White Sox, in 2005 the Astros became the first team from Texas to play in the World Series Bagwell also holds team career records for homeruns, extra base hits, total bases, RBIs, and walks. He retired in December 2006 and was hired as the Astros hitting coach on July 11, 2010. Bagwell was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2004.
Name:  
Ballanfant, Lee
City:  
Waco
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Waco native Lee Ballanfant became an umpire after a leg injury in 1925 shortened his promising playing career. From 1926-1935 he umpired in the Texas Association, Lone Star, West Texas and Texas Leagues. In 1936 he became the first Texan to umpire in the National League. His 22 year career lasted until 1958 and included a span of 11 ½ years in which Ballanfant did not miss an inning. Ballanfant was one of the quickest umpires in the major leagues and had a reputation for always being in position to make the call. Ballanfant umpired in six World Series and six All-Star Games. He later became a scout for the Chicago Cubs, Houston Astros and Texas Rangers. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1997.
Name:  
Banks, Ernie
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Ernie Banks, a product of Dallas’ Booker T. Washington High School (1946-49), is known as the greatest power-hitting shortstop of all time. Without ever having played a day in the minors, Banks joined the Chicago Cubs in September 1953. In 1958, he led the National League with 47 home runs, a record for a shortstop at that time, and drove in 129 runs. Banks won consecutive National League MVP awards in 1958 and 1959. Nineteen years and 2,528 games after signing with the Cubs, he retired with 512 home runs. Chicago fans voted him the "Greatest Cub Ever" in 1969. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1977 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1970.
Name:  
Barber, Miller
City:  
Texarkana
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Sherman, Texas, resident Miller Barber earned 11 victories on the PGA Tour including the 1968 Byron Nelson and the 1973 World Open Championship. He joined the Champions Tour in 1981 and won 24 events, second on the all-time list behind Lee Trevino. Known as “Mr. X,” Barber is the only three-time winner of the U.S. Senior Open (1982, 1984, 1985) and is the all-time Champions Tour leader in number of tournaments played with 603. Barber, a 1954 graduate of the University of Arkansas, also holds the Tour record for most consecutive years winning at least one event (1981-89). He is the first Senior Tour player to pass the 2 million dollar mark in career earnings and made more than 4 million dollars on the Champions Tour. Barber also has 24 career hole-in-ones. The Shreveport, La., native, born there on March 31, 1931, is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Class of 1996.
Name:  
Barnes, Bruce
City:  
Austin
School:  
Sport:  
Tennis
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Bruce Barnes became a tennis champion long before he reached the professional ranks. In three years of college tennis, he never lost a match. He won the Southwest Conference singles and doubles championships three consecutive years (1929, 1930, 1931). In 1931, he teamed with fellow Texan Karl Kamrath to win the national collegiate doubles title and was a singles finalist the same year. Barnes played professional tennis from 1932-1943 on the U.S. Pro Championship circuit (see list of tournaments won below). In 1933 Barnes and Bill Tilden won the World’s Professional Doubles title in Berlin, Germany. Barnes’ competition included French star Henri Cochet, British champion Fred Perry, and other top American players like Don Budge, Ellsworth Vines, and Vincent Richards. Barnes was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1979. U.S. Pro Championships 1932 National Professional Doubles with Bill Tilden (Chicago, IL) 1934 National Professional Doubles with Emmett Pare (Chicago, IL) 1937 National Professional Singles runner-up to Karel Kozeluh (Greenbrier, West Sulphur Springs, WV) 1938 National Professional Singles runner-up to Fred Perry (Chicago, IL) 1938 National Open Singles (Greenbrier, West Sulphur Springs, WV) 1938 National Open Doubles with Don Budge (Greenbrier, West Sulphur Springs, WV) 1939 National Professional Doubles (Beverly Hills, CA) 1943 National Professional Doubles with Gene Mako (Fort Knox, KY) 1943 National Professional Singles over John Nogrady (6-1,7-9,7-5,4-6,6-3) (Fort Knox, KY)
Name:  
Barr, Alfred
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Swimming
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Alfred "Red" Barr was one of the most successful coaches in Southwest Conference history. In his 25 years as swimming coach at Southern Methodist Univeristy (1946-1971), Barr's teams won 17 conference titles, including 15 in a row. No other Southwest Conference coach had ever won as many consecutive championships. All-American honors were awarded to 50 of his swimmers and divers who helped SMU finish in the NCAA Top 10 eight times in Barr's last nine years as coach. He also was responsible for the U.S. men's swimming teams victory at the 1963 Pan Am games. During Barr's coaching career, he served as chairman of the Amateur Athletic Union swimming rules committee, on the swimming committee of the Pan American Games, and president of the Southwestern Amateur Athletic Union. Later, SMU named its Olympic-sized pool for Barr as a memorial to his tireless work as SMU's greatest swimming coach. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1975.
Name:  
Bartzen, Barnard
City:  
San Angelo
School:  
Sport:  
Tennis
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Tut Bartzen is a genuine hall of famer, be it as a tennis player, club professional or college coach. As a teenager in San Angelo, he won three state high school titles, two in singles, plus the National Interscholastic singles championship. At college powerhouse William & Mary, the lefthander posted a 50-0 singles record and won the NCAA doubles title for the two-time national champions. Bartzen went on the USTA tour and was ranked in the top 10 nine straight years, two of them at No. 2. The Austin native served as co-captain of the U.S. Davis Cup team and won 15 singles duels while representing his country. After his playing career, Bartzen served 12 years as head tennis pro at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth before taking over the TCU program in 1974. His tennis teams were ranked nationally every year but one in a 20 year stretch. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.
Name:  
Baugh, Sammy
City:  
Sweetwater
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Sammy Baugh is known for taking professional football “off the ground” and putting it “in the air”. By the time Baugh had graduated from Texas Christian University in 1937, his passing ability had twice earned him All-America honors and the nickname, “Slingin’ Sammy”. His pro career with the Washington Redskins lasted from 1937-1952. His career totals include 21,886 yards passing, 186 touchdown passes, a 45.1 punting average and 28 interceptions. Baugh led the Redskins to world championships in 1937 and 1942. He also led the league in passing six times. Baugh was a charter member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1963. In 1954, he was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame.
Name:  
Baylor, Don
City:  
Austin
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
DON BAYLOR. Don Baylor of Austin had a stellar 19 year major league career (1970-1988) with the Baltimore Orioles, Oakland Athletics, California Angels, Minnesota Twins and Boston Red Sox. In 1979, with California, he batted .296 with 36 homeruns and 139 RBIs to win the AL MVP award. In 1993 Baylor was named manager of the expansion Colorado Rockies, a position he held for six seasons. He led the Rockies to more wins than any other National League expansion team in history. Baylor was named NL Manager of the Year in 1995 after leading Colorado to the playoffs. He also served as manager of the Chicago Cubs from 1999-2002. Baylor is currently the hitting coach for the Rockies; he has also served as the hitting coach for the Seattle Mariners and bench coach for the New York Mets. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1996.
Name:  
Beaty, Zelmo
City:  
Hillister, Texas
School:  
Prairie View A&M University
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2015
Zelmo Beaty played for Coach John Payton at Woodville's Scott High School and won back to back Prairie View Interscholastic League 1A state championships in 1957 & 1958. From 1958-1962 at Prairie View A&M Beaty averaged 25 points and 20 rebounds per game and was a two-time first team NAIA All-American (1960 & 1962). The "Big Z" led Prairie View A&M to the NAIA national basketball title in 1962 and was named the Chuck Taylor Tournament MVP. He was picked third overall by the St. Louis Hawks in the 1962 NBA Draft. A 6'9" center who was known for his tough, hard-nosed play he averaged 17.4 points and 11.2 rebounds in 7 seasons (1962-1969) for the St. Louis Hawks. He made the NBA All-Rookie first team and 2 All-Star Games before switching to the rival ABA's Utah Stars in 1970. Beaty led the Stars to the 1971 ABA title while averaging 22.9 points and 15.7 rebounds, and was named MVP of the playoffs. In Utah he averaged 19.1 points, 11.6 rebounds and was 3-time All-Star in 4 seasons (1970-1974). In He played his final NBA season with the Los Angeles Lakers in 1975. Beaty scored 15,207 points and had 9,665 rebounds during his 12 season professional career. He was named to the ABA’s 30-man all-time team in 1997 and was inducted into the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame 2014. Beaty passed away on August 27, 2013.
Name:  
Bell, W.M.
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
W.M. "Matty" Bell was the only man to enjoy coaching success with three Southwest Conference football teams. In his first head-coaching job at Texas Christian University in 1923, Bell guided the Horned Frogs to a 33-17-5 record in their first six conference seasons. In 1929, Bell replaced Dana Bible at Texas A&M and compiled a 24-21-3 record in five seasons. In 1935, Bell became head coach at Southern Methodist University, which went 12-0 and won the national championship. SMU also had the distinction of being the only Southwest Conference team ever to go to the Rose Bowl. Serving as SMU's head coach from 1935 to 1941 and after the war from 1945 through 1949, Bell's teams won 78 games, lost 39 and tied 7. SMU won league titles in 1947 and 1948 and played in two Cotton Bowls. Bell was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1960.
Name:  
Bellard, Emory
City:  
Aransas Pass
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Emory Bellard began his illustrious coaching career in the high school ranks where he compiled a 177-59-9 record over 21 seasons. He won back to back state championships at Breckenridge in 1958 and 1959 and a third at San Angelo in 1966. In 1968, as an assistant at the University of Texas, Bellard created the Wishbone offense. The Longhorns ran the offense to perfection, winning six straight SWC titles and two National Championships. In 1972 Bellard became the head coach at Texas A&M and led the Aggies to three bowl games before resigning in 1978. During his seven-year tenure at Mississippi State Bellard�s teams made back to back bowl appearances for the first time in school history. In 1975 he was named College Coach of the Year by the AFCA. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.
Name:  
Berkman, Lance
City:  
Waco, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
LANCE BERKMAN. Waco native and New Braunfels Canyon graduate Lance Berkman has spent the majority of his entire baseball career within the state of Texas. At Rice University from 1995-1997, under fellow Texas Sports Hall of Fame member Coach Wayne Graham, Berkman earned All-America honors as an outfielder. Berkman�s career numbers at Rice: a .385 batting average, 67 home runs and 272 RBI. In 1997, he was named the National College Player of the Year by the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association. That season he hit 41 homers (third-most in the country) and his 134 RBI was the second-highest single-season total in NCAA history. The 6 foot, 1 inch, 220-pound Berkman was a first-round pick (16th overall) of the Houston Astros in the 1997 MLB draft. �The Big Puma� quickly adjusted to life in the majors, joining Mickey Mantle as only the second switch-hitter in Major League history to hit 40 or more homers in multiple seasons. During his 12th season with the Astros, the six-time All-star was traded to the New York Yankees on July 31, 2010. The following year, he joined the Saint Louis Cardinals as a free agent and was named the National League�s Comeback Player of the Year after hitting .301 with 31 home runs in 2011, helping the Cardinals win the World Series in seven games against the Texas Rangers. Berkman entered the 2012 season with impressive career numbers of 1,822 hits, 358 home runs, 1,193 RBI and a .296 batting average. Berkman, who has finished as high as third in the National League MVP voting twice in his career (2002, 2006) is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2009.
Name:  
Berry, Raymond
City:  
Paris
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Raymond Emmett Berry finished his pro football career with the Baltimore Colts as the NFL's all-time leader in receptions (631) and career yards (9,275). Berry's career was based on hard work, determination and a devotion to practice. He played high school football in Paris for his father Raymond Berry Sr. He spent a year at Schreiner Junior College before transferring to SMU (1951-1954) where he was the Mustangs' captain and earned All-Southwest Conference honors in 1954. Berry played 13 seasons as wide receiver for the Baltimore Colts from 1955-1967. He concentrated on precise route running and came up with moves and fakes to get open. Berry led the NFL in receiving three seasons (1958, 1959 & 1960), earning All-NFL honors each time. He also was named to six Pro Bowls. He played in three championship games, including the fabled 1958 title game between the Colts and New York Giants. Berry set a record in that game with 12 catches for 178 yards and a touchdown to lead the Colts to a 23-17 win in overtime. Berry served as head coach of the New England Patriots from 1984-1989. In 1986 he led the club to its first ever Super Bowl appearance. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1973 and was selected to the NFL's 75th Anniversary All-Time Team. Berry was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1974.
Name:  
Bethea, Elvin
City:  
Trenton, NJ
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Elvin Bethea played 16 seasons with the Houston Oilers from 1968-1983. Originally drafted as an offensive lineman out of North Carolina A&T, he developed into one of the NFL's premier defensive ends. At 6'3 and 285 lbs. Bethea was known for his great quickness, variety of moves and relentless pursuit of opposing offenses. The franchise's all-time leader for sacks in a season (16) and career (105). Bethea was selected to eight Pro Bowls and helped the Oilers advance to AFC Championship games in 1978 & 1979. When he retired he held franchise records for most seasons (16), most career regular season games played (210) and consecutive regular season games (135). The Houston Oilers retired Bethea's number 65 jersey in 1983. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio on August. 3, 2003 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2003.
Name:  
Bible, Dana X.
City:  
Jefferson City, Tennessee
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
During Dana X. Bible's 32 seasons as a head football coach, he developed 14 conference championship teams, including five at Texas A&M and three at the University of Texas. He also coached at Brandon Prep in Shelbyville, Tenn., Mississippi College, Louisiana State, and Nebraska. Bible ranked third nationally in the number of collegiate coaching victories when he retired at the University of Texas after the 1946 season. After retiring as coach, Bible continued as director of athletics at Texas 10 more years and served as a member of the National Collegiate Football Rules Committee for 27 years. He was a charter inductee to the National Football Hall of Fame in 1951, a recipient of the Amos Alonzo Stagg Award in 1954, and was selected as one of the top 25 coaches of a 25-year period by a national poll. Bible was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1959, the Longhorn Hall of Fame in 1960, the University of Nebraska Sports Hall of Fame in 1962, and Texas A&M's Athletic Hall of Fame in 1966.
Name:  
Biggio, Craig
City:  
Smithtown, New York
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
CRAIG BIGGIO. In 20 seasons with the Houston Astros (1988-2007) Craig Biggio has rewritten the record books. He holds club records for seasons played (20), games (2,850), consecutive games (494), at bats (10,876), runs scored (1,844), hits (3,060), singles (2,046) and doubles (668). Biggio also holds the team record for number of All-Star Games played in with seven. He won Gold Glove Awards at second base in 1994, 1995, 1996 & 1997 and has also played catcher and outfield. Biggio and longtime teammate Jeff Bagwell led the Astros to four NL Central titles in 1997, 1998, 1999 & 2001. In 2004 the Astros captured the NL Wild Card and won their first playoff series ever by defeating the Atlanta Braves in the NL Divisional Playoffs. The Astros' 2004 season ended with a loss to the St. Louis Cardinals in game 7 of the National League Championship Series. Although they lost to the Chicago White Sox, in 2005 the Astros became the first team from Texas to play in the World Series. He announced his retirement on July 24, 2007 to be effective at the end of the season. Biggio was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2004.
Name:  
Blackman, Rolando
City:  
Panama City, Panama
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Rolando Blackman, a native of Panama City, Panama, was the Dallas Mavericks' 1st round pick (9th overall) in the 1981 NBA Draft. A member of the 1980 Olympic basketball team, he attended Kansas State University where he was a two-time All-American, three-time conference "Defensive Player of the Year" and a member of the Associated Press' Big 12 Conference All-Century Team. Blackman made the most famous basket in Kansas State history, a 17-footer from the baseline with two seconds left against No.2-ranked Oregon State in the 1981 NCAA Tournament. During his 11 seasons in Dallas (1981-1992) the 6'6 guard made four All-Star teams and led the Mavericks to six playoff appearances. Blackman retired with 6,487 field goals and 16,643 points with the Mavericks- a record he held for 18 years- and scored a total of 17,623 points. His number 22 was retired by the Mavericks on March 11, 2000. Blackman has worked for the Mavericks since 2000 serving as an assistant coach, TV analyst and currently is the club's Director of Basketball Development. He continues his community service as a spokesperson for several charitable organizations in the Dallas/Fort Worth area and globally as a Goodwill Ambassador for the NBA and United Nations Office of Drugs and Corruption. Blackman was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2008.
Name:  
Blair, Gary
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The Class of 2011 would not be complete without Texas A&M women's basketball Head Coach Gary Blair. In his 26 years as a collegiate head coach, Blair has only experienced one losing season. A two-time national finalist for the esteemed Naismith Coach of the Year Award, he continues to represent the Aggies as one of the most active Division 1 coaches in the women's game today. With 22 postseason appearances, 17 NCAA Tournament appearances and 2 Final Four appearances, Blair is far from a rookie. Highlighting his career is the fact that he is one of only three NCAA Division 1 coaches to lead two separate women's basketball teams to the NCAA Final Four - - Arkansas in 1998 and Texas A&M in 2011. In his 9 years at Texas A&M, Blair has guided the women's basketball program to six straight NCAA Tournament appearances. The most historic moment he's experienced took place last season when the Aggies won the National Championship. Leading the Aggies to their first national title and first-ever trip to the NCAA Women's Final Four, Blair closed out the 2010-11 season with an astounding 33-5 record, the most wins in Aggie history. Born and raised in Dallas, Blair played center field on the baseball team at Bryan Adams High School, receiving all-city honors in 1963. He graduated from Texas Tech University with a bachelor's in health and physical education and a master's in education. After graduation, Blair thought he would end up coaching high school baseball somewhere in Lubbock, but plans changed when he was offered a position in Dallas at South Oak Cliff High School as the physical education coach. Blair became coach of the girl's basketball program, and the boys and girls golf teams at South Oak Cliff in 1973. Seven seasons and three state Class 4A championships later, Blair had made his mark in high school girl's basketball and was inducted into the Texas High School Basketball Hall of Fame. In October 1980, he accepted the assistant coaching position at Louisiana Tech University under then co-head coaches Sonja Hogg and Leon Barmore. Blair spent 5 seasons at La.Tech, reaching the NCAA Final Four four times and winning two National Championships. Blair's took the head coaching job at Stephen F. Austin University in 1985. The team enjoyed success under Blair and increased home attendance to rank in the top 12 of NCAA Division 1 attendance leaders. After eight years with SFA, Blair became head coach of the women's team at the University of Arkansas, accumulating a 198-120 record. Blair came to Texas A&M in 2003. He is a tireless recruiter and has brought quality players to the campus in College Station. He continues to amaze Aggie fans with impressive record-breaking statistics. He works hard to encourage fans to attend women's basketball games and increased attendance his first season by 71% from the previous year. The Aggies had their greatest year in 2011. They defeated Baylor 58-46 in front of 11,088 fans to advance to the Final Four. They then beat Stanford for a chance to play in the title game. The Aggies beat Notre Dame, 76-70, wining the National Championship for the first time in school history.
Name:  
Boggess, Lynton
City:  
Terrell
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
When Lynton "Dusty" Boggess was nine years old, he talked his way into the batboy's job with the Waco team of the Texas League, a move that set the pattern for his life. Boggess broke into baseball as a player with Cleburne of the old Texas-Oklahoma League. He shortly became known for his versatility based on his ability to play every position. He later served in the East Texas, Western, Dixie and Texas Leagues, and for a time, he doubled as player and manager. After his playing days ended in 1938, he began umpiring in the Western, Texas, and National Leagues and became one of the best. As a National League Umpire in 1944, he worked in four World Series games and three All-Star games. Boggess was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1973.
Name:  
Boynton, Ben Lee
City:  
Waco
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
In 1917 Ben Lee Boynton achieved the distinction of being the first Texan to be named an All-American. At the time, he was an 18-year old sophomore at Williams College in Williamson, Mass. Boynton, a triple-threat quarterback from Waco, led the Williams College football team to an undefeated season in 1917. Boynton was named to the All-America team, an honor he achieved again in 1919. As a senior and captain in 1920, he was the nation's leading scorer with 141 points and he tied an all-time record of 110 yards for the longest scoring run. Boynton played four seasons of professional football (1921-1924) with the Rochester Jeffersons, Washington Senators and Buffalo Bisons before serving as a football official in the Southwest Conference. Boynton was inducted into the National Football Hall of Fame in 1962 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1965.
Name:  
Bradley, Bill
City:  
Palestine, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Bill Bradley was a high school All-American quarterback at Palestine, Texas. "Super Bill" accounted for three Wildcats touchdowns in a 24-15 victory over San Marcos in the 1964 3A state title game. He later played quarterback and defensive back at the University of Texas (1966-1968). Bradley was a tri-captain on the Longhorns' 1968 SWC title team that finished no. 3 in the nation. He was selected to play in the 1969 Hula Bowl and the College All-Star Game. The versatile Bradley later played defensive back, punter & kick returner in the NFL with Philadelphia Eagles from 1969 to 1976. He ended his career with the Minnesota Vikings and the St. Louis Cardinals in 1977. A three-time All-Pro with the Eagles, he was the first player to lead the NFL in interceptions in back to back seasons (1971 & 1972). In recent years Bradley has served as a secondary coach at both the collegiate and professional levels. Bradley was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2008.
Name:  
Bradshaw, Wesley
City:  
Athens
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Wesley Bradshaw, a letterman in football, basketball, track, and baseball at Baylor University, was noted for his talent in football. He was the Southwest Conference's top quarterback in 1921 and 1922, during which time he led the Bears to a pair of 8-3 season records. In 1922, he kicked 11 field goals, a record that stood for 41 years. During the 1922 game against Arkansas, he scored 30 points (four touchdowns and six PATs). By the end of the 1922 season, Bradshaw had scored 119 points. He also held Baylor's all-time career-scoring record with 178 points. After graduating from Baylor, Bradshaw played professional football in the early days of the National Football League with the Rock Island Independents in 1924 and the Buffalo Rangers in 1926. He later coached football at Polytechnic High School in Fort Worth and Ouachita Baptist College in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. Bradshaw was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1966.
Name:  
Bragan, Bobby
City:  
Birmingham, AL
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Catcher/Manager of the Fort Worth Cats from 1948-1952 during that time the Cats, a AA affiliate of the Brooklyn Dodgers never finished below .500 and won the Texas League Pennant in 1948 and 1949. During the 1949 season Bragan played catcher in 111 games, hit .295 and did not allow a past ball the whole season. Bragan later served as President of the Texas League from 1969-1975 and was the first Cat to have his jersey retired at a ceremony held on May 24, 2003. Bragan became the oldest manager in baseball history on August 15, 2005 when he suited up for the Fort Worth Cats of the Central League. The 87 year old broke the record that was formerly held by Connie Mack by one week. Bragan played with the Philadelphia Phillies (1940-42) and the Brooklyn Dodgers (1943-48) before managing at Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Milwaukee and Atlanta. He founded the Bobby Bragan Youth Foundation in 1991 to motivate youth to become better scholars, citizens and athletes, and to serve as leaders and role models for their peers. His autobiography You Can't Hit the Ball With the Bat on Your Shoulder: The Baseball Life and Times of Bobby Bragan was published in 1992. He is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Class of 2005.
Name:  
Brandt, Gill
City:  
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2015
Gil Brandt served as the Dallas Cowboys VP of player personnel from 1960-1988. Along with coach Tom Landry and general manager Tex Schramm he helped the Cowboys get to five Super Bowls including World Championships in 1971 & 1977. He helped pioneer scouting techniques that are still used today, including computer analysis. Brandt was among the first to identify athletes from other sports -- Bob Hayes (track), Cornell Green (basketball), Toni Fritsch (soccer) -- with football potential. Adept at finding free agent rookies with star quality (Cliff Harris, Drew Pearson & Everson Walls). Brandt is also credited with originating the philosophy of drafting the "best athlete available" rather than a team's positional need. He now works as an analyst and handles player invitations to the NFL Draft. Brandt is also a contributor for NFL.com and a radio host on Sirius XM NFL Radio.
Name:  
Brannon, Byron
City:  
Athens
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Byron "Buster" Brannon was a winner as a player and coach. His career in sports began in Pine Bluff, Ark., where he played on a state high school football championship team. He later moved to Athens, Texas, where he played on a state and national high school basketball title-winning team. At Texas Christian University, Brannon was twice an All-Southwest Conference basketball guard and quarterbacked the Horned Frogs' conference champion football team in 1932. After college Brannon switched to coaching. In his first job he coached football at Dublin High School, where his team won two regional football crowns. He gained his notable reputation, however, as a college basketball coach. His teams at TCU won four Southwest Conference championships (1951, 1952, 1953, 1959), and his teams at Rice won two more (1940, 1942). Brannon was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1970.
Name:  
Brazile, Trevor
City:  
Amarillo, Texas
School:  
Sport:  
Rodeo
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
2016
There are few American rodeo champions as famous and as successful as Decatur’s Trevor Brazile. Since 1996, Brazile is a 23-time world champion and 13-time PRCA all-around world champion winning a record eight consecutive PRCA world championships at one point in his career. Brazile’s 13 all-around titles are the most ever from by a multi-event cowboy in the history of American rodeo. Competing in tie-down roping, team roping and steer roping, he has left his mark all over the rodeo world. Brazile is the first cowboy to surpass $6 million in career earnings with his best individual year coming in 2010 as he earned a record $508,000 in 2010. He and his wife Shada Brazile are one of the most recognizable husband-wife duos in the sport of rodeo. She is an accomplished rodeo athlete as well winning numerous horse barrel racing competitions in rodeos across the U.S. When Brazile isn’t winning rodeo world championships, he spends his time developing the rodeo clothing brand Relentless he helped found. In 2015, Brazile was part of a group of the best rodeo athletes in the world that launched the Elite Rodeo Athletes (ERA) with the mission of creating a stage for the best rodeo athletes in the world to compete in events in a true “League of Champions”.
Name:  
Brees, Drew
City:  
Austin, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Drew Brees, a native of Austin, Texas, was an all-state quarterback with 3,528 yards leading Westlake to the 5A Division II 1996 state title his senior year with a perfect 16-0 record. Brees is the Purdue and Big Ten career leader in every major passing category, including passing attempts (1,678), passing completions (1,026), passing yards (11,792), passing touchdowns (90) and total offense (12,692). His college years were successful both on and off the football field, and in his senior year, he was named the Academic All-American of the Year, Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year and the Maxwell Award winner. Brees spent five seasons with the San Diego Chargers before signing as a free agent with the New Orleans Saints in 2006. He was named MVP of Super Bowl after leading the team to its first NFL title in 2009. Brees has 45,919 career passing yards with 324 touchdowns and in 2011 was the NFL's all-time single season leader with 5,476 passing yards. He's also been selected to play in seven Pro-Bowls. On Oct. 7, 2012, Brees made history by breaking Johnny Unitas' record (47) for consecutive games with a touchdown pass.
Name:  
Bridges, Frank
City:  
Waco
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Throughout his successful career as the head football coach at Baylor, Frank Bridges attempted nearly every trick and strategy the rules allowed. He is known for introducing the spread formation, the hidden-ball play, the end-around, and the tackle-around. Bridges spent six years as the head coach of the Bears (1920-25) and compiled a 35-18-6 record. In 1922 and 1924, he directed Baylor to its first Southwest Conference championships. He also coached the Baylor baseball team to the school's last undisputed Southwest Conference crown in 1923. He worked for several years as a major-league scout and signed several outstanding players. Bridges was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1973.
Name:  
Brown, Mack
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Head Coach William Mack Brown enters his 14th season with the University of Texas football team. Elevating the Longhorn program to unimaginable heights with a 133-34 record, the pinnacle of his career so far, is leading the Longhorns to a National Championship in 2005. Brown is one of the few coaches to lead two separate programs to a NCAA Top Five national finish. In 2005, Brown received the Paul W. "Bear" Bryant National Coach of the Year award, in 2008 he won the Bobby Dodd National Coach of the Year and the 2009 was named Big 12 Coach of the Year. Honored in the Longhorn Hall of Fame, Brown is the second coach in UT history to reach 100 wins, joining Darrell Royal. He is also one of six current coaches at NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision schools who have 100 victories or more at their university. He reached 200 victories as a head coach in 2008, making him the 19th coach to do so in ten years at a Football Bowl Subdivision school. Brown is also known as a great recruiter. "I've never seen anyone make friends better or quicker with the high school coaching community," said Eddie Joseph, former executive VP of the Texas High School Coaches Association. "He has the ability to make everyone feel at ease around him. I think the thing that makes him so great is that he has a passion for high school coaches and great respect for them." In his years at Texas, Brown's teams have included Heisman Trophy Winner Ricky Williams, two Heisman trophy runners-up, three Maxwell Award winners, two Manning Award winners, two Draddy/Campbell award winners (scholar-athlete award), 51 All-Americans, five Big 12 Offensive Players of the Year, five Big 12 Defensive Players of the Year and 10 Big 12 Freshman of the Year honorees. Born in Cookeville, Tenn., Brown played football at Putnam County High School, lettering three times. He earned his college diploma at Florida State, where he lettered twice as a running back for the Seminoles (1972-73) and graduated in 1974 with a bachelor's degree in education. Upon graduation, Brown coached for three seasons at Southern Mississippi, mainly working with the receivers. To continue his education, he earned his master�s in administration from Southern Miss and graduated in 1976. After 10 seasons as an assistant, he accepted a head coaching position at Appalachian State in 1983. He left after one season to become offensive coordinator at Oklahoma. Spending a successful season at OU, he went on to become head coach at Tulane. His next stop was the University of North Carolina where he spent 12 years. Brown took a football program that had suffered losing seasons and rebuilt it to a 10-1 regular season record. Leaving UNC at its peak, he finally accepted the head coach position at UT in 1997. Having his most successful season of his career in 2005, Brown led the Longhorns to their first National Championship appearance since 1970. "Mack has helped bring back the pride in Texas Football," former Longhorns All-American Tommy Nobis said."Tradition is what makes the college game so exciting, and Mack is doing a great job getting everyone excited about wearing the burnt orange and white and being a Longhorn again."
Name:  
Brown, Tim
City:  
Dallas, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dallas native Tim Brown was a prep All-American at Woodrow Wilson High School. At Notre Dame he was a two-time consensus All-America wide receiver. Brown won the Heisman Trophy as a senior in 1987. He set Notre Dame career records for receiving yards (2,493), kickoff return yards (1,613) and all-purpose yards (5,024). Brown played 16 seasons with the Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders from 1988-2003. He played his final season with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2004. During his career Brown caught 1,094 passes for 14,934 yards and 100 touchdowns. He holds Raider career records for receptions (1,070), receiving yards (14,734), TDs (99) punt returns (320) and punt return yardage (3,272). He was selected to play in nine Pro Bowls. Brown currently works on Fox Sports Net's Pro Football Preview Show. Brown was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2005.
Name:  
Browning, David
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Diving
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
David "Skippy" Browning began diving in Corpus Christi when he was 4 years old. Before his death at the age of 25 in a Navy jet crash, Browning was recognized as the best springboard diver in the world. Browning won eight national AAU diving championships and two NCAA crowns. He was a three-time Southwest Conference one- and three-meter diving champ. He was a three-time All-American (1950-1952) and was the Olympic gold medalist at the 1952 games in Helsinki. He was a member of the Helms Hall Diving Hall of Fame as well as the University of Texas Longhorn Hall of Honor. Browning was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1962.
Name:  
Brunson, Emmett
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The career of Emmett Evander Brunson spanned five decades as an athlete, coach, and administrator at Rice University. As a track and field athlete in 1928, he led the Owls to their first Southwest Conference title by setting records in the 880 and the mile while scoring a meet-high 12 points. During Brunson's tenure, the Owls scored more points in NCAA outdoor championships than any other SWC school and won five conference team titles. Brunson served the Owls as head track and field coach for 34 years (1934-1942 and 1946-1970), interrupted by a three-year tour as a naval officer. He coached four Olympians at Rice, including 1964 pole vault gold medal winner, Fred Hansen. Brunson also doubled as Rice's athletic business manager after his first seven years of coaching. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1984.
Name:  
Burke, Jackie Jr.
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
As the son of a golf professional, it was only natural that Jack Burke, Jr. develop a love for the sport. He turned pro at the age of 17 and became the head pro at the Galveston Country Club before his 20th birthday. During World War II, Burke put his golf career on hold while he served in the Marine Corps. Burke won 15 titles on the PGA Tour including two majors in 1956, the Masters and the PGA Championship. He also had an amazing streak of four consecutive victories in 1952. Burke played on five Ryder Cup teams in the 1950s and was the non-playing captain of the 1973 team. In 1958 Burke and Jimmy Demaret founded Champions Golf Club in Houston, Texas. Burke was inducted into the PGA Hall of Fame in 1976, the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1978.
Name:  
Campbell, Dave
City:  
Waco
School:  
Sport:  
Media
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dave is the founder of the Bible of the king of sports in the state, Texas Football Magazine, and the former sports editor at the Waco Tribune-Herald. He has perhaps witnessed more Baylor athletic endeavors than anyone else. A past president of the Football Writers Association of America, he received the first Wilbur Evans Award for Lifetime Achievement in Sports Journalism by the Headliners Club of Austin. The press box at Floyd Casey Stadium in Waco has been named the Dave Campbell Media Center in his honor. A Waco-area native, Dave graduated cum laude from Baylor in 1950 and was named a Distinguished Alumnus in 1992. He won the Touchdown Club's Touchdowner of the Year Award in 1996, which is given annually for extraordinary contributions and outstanding achievement reflecting honor and sportsmanship to football over a lengthy period of time. Campbell was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2005.
Name:  
Campbell, Earl
City:  
Tyler
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Earl Christian Campbell utilized a rare blend of speed and power to become the dominant running back of his era. It began as a senior at John Tyler High School when the converted defensive end gained 2,893 yards in a 15-0 run to the Class 4A state title. At the University of Texas, Campbell averaged 1,110 yards per season in his four varsity years. He capped a brilliant Longhorn career in 1977 by winning the Heisman Trophy after he had led the nation in rushing (1,744 yards) and touchdowns (19). The Houston Oilers traded their starting tight end plus three draft choices to make Campbell the first player drafted in 1978. He responded by leading the NFL in rushing his first three seasons, compiling totals of 1,450, 1,697, and 1,934. His career totals with the Houston Oilers (1978-1984) and the New Orleans Saints (1984-1985) include 9,407 yards, 74 rushing TDs and five Pro Bowls. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1991 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1996.
Name:  
Carter, Michael
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Football, Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
In addition to his football career, Michael Carter was one of the most accomplished shot putters in Texas history. At Dallas' Jefferson High School from 1977-79 he won three 4A state titles in the shot and one in the discus. Carter broke the national shot record nine times his senior year and set the state and national prep record (which still stand) with a throw of 81' 3" at the Golden West Invitational meet in Sacramento, California. From 1979-1983 he was a defensive lineman for SMU teams that won SWC titles in 1981 and 1982. In 1983 Carter was an All-SWC selection. He was the SWC shot put champion three times and went on to win seven NCAA titles - four indoor (1980, 1981, 1983, 1984) and three outdoor (1980, 1981, 1983). His best collegiate mark in the shot was 71' 4 ". At the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles Carter won the Silver medal with a throw of 69' 2" meters. He continued his athletic career in California, this time though, as a member of the San Francisco 49ers from 1984-1992. Carter was a three-time Pro Bowl nosetackle for the 49ers and anchored a defense that helped San Francisco win three Super Bowls (1985, 1989 & 1990). Carter's daughter Michelle followed in her father's footsteps by setting the girls' UIL state record in the shot (53' 3") and discus (169' 3"). He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2002.
Name:  
Cash, Norm
City:  
Justiceburg
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Norm Cash of Justiceburg, Texas played football and baseball at Sul Ross University where he set the school rushing record in football with 1,255 yards in 1954. "Stormin' Norman" spent most of his 17-year career with the Detroit Tigers (1960-74). The left handed first baseman blasted 377 career home runs including four over the roof of Tiger Stadium. A lifetime .271 hitter, Cash led the AL in average (.361) and hits (193) in 1961. He played in two World Series. In the 1968 Series Cash hit .385 as the Tigers beat the St. Louis Cardinals in seven games. Cash was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.
Name:  
Cashion, Red
City:  
College Station
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
College Station native Red Cashion officiated his first football game while a student at Texas A&M in 1952. For the next 21 years he officiated high school and college football in the Southland, Lone Star and Southwest Conferences. In 1972 Cashion, who would became known for his famous "First Down!" calls, was selected to work NFL games as a Line Judge. He was promoted to Referee in 1976 and worked over 500 NFL games including two Super Bowls, 18 playoff games and one Pro Bowl. Cashion retired in 1997 and currently serves as a trainer for the referees in the NFL and the Big 12. Cashion was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.
Name:  
Cawthon, Pete
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Peter Willis "Pete" Cawthon was a legend in the Texas College football-coaching ranks. At Beaumont High School, where he began his coaching career in 1919, Cawthon coached Dunlap "Bull" Johnson who became Texas A&M"s first All-American. Cawthon did an outstanding job of building football teams at Terrill Prep in Dallas, Austin College, and Texas Tech. At Terrill Prep, he posted two nine-victory seasons, and during his five years at Austin College, his teams did not have a single losing year. At Texas Tech, he put the Red Raiders into their first two bowl games and finished an 11-year Tech career with a record of 76-32-6. Cawthon ended his 16-year college coaching tenure with 98 wins, 51 losses, and 10 ties. He later coached professional football and was the athletic director at Alabama. Cawthon was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1978.
Name:  
Cherry, Blair
City:  
Weatherford
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Few football coaches have been blessed with a winning touch like that of J. Blair Cherry. His Amarillo Sandies won three consecutive state championships from 1934-36. In seven seasons at Amarillo, his teams had an unequalled record of 83-5-1. From 1937-1946 Cherry served as an assistant coach at the University of Texas under D.X. Bible. Cherry took over as head coach in 1947 and during his four seasons compiled a 32-10-1 record and led the Longhorns to three bowl games. Texas defeated Alabama 27-7 in the 1948 Sugar Bowl and Georgia in the 1949 Orange Bowl. Cherry resigned after a 20-14 defeat at the hands of Tennessee in the 1951 Cotton Bowl citing health reasons and the growing expectations from the Texas alumni and fans. Cherry was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1966.
Name:  
Childress, Ray
City:  
Memphis, TN
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Ray Childress was an All-State and All-America lineman at Richardson Pearce High School. Childress was a key component in helping Coach Jackie Sherrill rebuild at Texas A&M. Piling up 360 tackles, 26 sacks and nine fumble recoveries during his career (1981-1984), he was a two-time All-America selection at defensive lineman for the Aggies. Childress currently ranks fifth in all-time tackles and sacks at A&M. In 1999, he was honored as a member of 12th Man Magazine's Texas A&M All-Time Team. Childress continued his success in the NFL with the Houston Oilers as a defensive tackle from 1985-1995. He was voted to play in five Pro Bowls and finished his career ranked second on the Oilers all-time sack list and sixth on the team's all-time tackle list. Childress also had 13 career multi-sack games with the Oilers. Other post-football honors include having his Ray Childress Auto Group named GM's Dealer of the Year in 2004, winning the Chevrolet Genuine Leader Award and being listed among the Top 100 Dealers in the U.S. by Automotive News in 2003. Since the mid 1990's he and his wife Kara have been actively involved in the Childress Foundation Academy to benefit the youth of Houston. Childress is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2007.
Name:  
Clemens, Roger
City:  
Spring
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Roger Clemens, a product of Spring Woods High School, was a two time All-American pitcher at the University of Texas. He led the Longhorns to a 4-3 victory over Alabama in the 1983 College World Series title game. Clemens has pitched for the Boston Red Sox (1984-1996) the Toronto Blue Jays (1997-1998) New York Yankees (1999-2003, 2007-)and the Houston Astros (2004-2006). After signing with New York in 1999 he was a member of the Yankees' World Series Championship teams in 1999 and 2000. Clemens later signed with his home-town Astros in 2004 and led them to their second ever National League Championship Series appearance. "The Rocket" is the first pitcher to win seven Cy Young Awards (1986, 1987, 1991, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2004), the oldest to win the award and the fourth to win the award in both leagues. In 1986 he was named AL MVP and MVP of the All Star Game, one of his 10 All-Star Game appearances. Clemens is the active leader in wins, strikeouts, complete games and shutouts. The 6'4 right-hander also owns the record for most strikeouts in a 9 inning game (20-twice). At age 44 he won his 350th game while pitching for the New York Yankees. In 1993 he became the first player in history to have his University of Texas baseball number (21) retired. Clemens was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1998.
Name:  
Cobb, Fred
City:  
Antelope
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Fred Cobb compiled an incredible coaching record at North Texas State University and, in doing so, popularized golf as an intercollegiate sport. He began recruiting young golfers to the Denton campus in 1946. Cobb coached some of the finest golfers in NCAA history including Billy Maxwell, Don January, Ross Collins, Buster Reed, Joe Conrad, Gene Towry, Plamer Lawrence, and Marion Hiskey. Cobb's players won 17 individual championships. In 1949, Cobb's North Texas State teams won four consecutive NCAA Golf Championships from 1949-1952. Overall, Cobb's eight-year record was 72-10-3, with 22 tournament crowns. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.
Name:  
Cokes, Curtis
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Boxing
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Curtis Cokes was the third Texan, and the first from Dallas, to win an undisputed world boxing championship. In 1966, Dallas manager Doug Lord convinced Cokes to enter a tournament for the World Boxing Association Crown. Cokes knocked out Luis Rodriguez and won a unanimous decision against Manuel Gonzales to earn a clear-cut title shot. The title chance finally came on November 28, 1966 in Dallas, where he unanimously defeated the renowned Jean Josselin of France for the WBA crown. He successfully defended the championship five times before losing in April 1969 to Jose Napoles. He retired in 1973 with a 62-14-3 record. Cokes is continuing his boxing legacy by serving as a trainer at his Home of Champions gym in Dallas. In 1995 he trained Dallas native Quincy Taylor to the World Welterweight Title. Cokes was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1984.
Name:  
Coleman, A.M.
City:  
Roscoe
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
As the oldest of eight children in an itinerant farming family living off the harsh land of West Texas, Tonto Coleman learned how to overcome obstacles in life. Thirty-four out of 37 seasons Coleman coached, his teams posted winning records. Coleman was head football coach at Abilene Christian for five years (1942-1947) and served as assistant athletic director and assistant coach for 14 years at Georgia Tech. At the age of 58, he became the commissioner of the Southeastern Conference, serving 6 years. Coleman retired to Abilene in 1972, even though the SEC offered him a new five-year contract. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1983.
Name:  
Conley, James Patrick
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
James Patrick "Snipe" Conley, one of the best spitball pitchers in the minors, set a Texas League record of 19 consecutive victories while pitching for Dallas in 1917. During that record setting season, Conley pitched a no-hitter in which he faced the minimum 27 batters and led the league in wins (27) and strikeouts (171). Conley pitched for Dallas for 12 seasons (1916-1927) and managed the team for three (1925-1927). His mound work helped to win two pennants (1917, 1918), and he piloted his club to a third (1926). He retired from the league when the spitter was outlawed but was coaxed back to pitch two games for Dallas 1941. Conley, now in his late forties, won both games for his old team. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1973.
Name:  
Conrad, Bobby Joe
City:  
Clifton
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Bobby Joe Conrad started his football career along the banks of the Bosque River in Clifton, Texas. An all-state quarterback, he guided the Cubs to district championships in 1952 and 1953. His senior season Conrad scored 207 points and led Clifton to the state semi-finals where they lost to eventual state champion Ranger. He played football Texas A&M from 1955-57 under legendary coach Paul "Bear" Bryant. Conrad played quarterback, halfback, fullback and end for the Aggies and was a member of the school's 1956 SWC Championship team. In the 1958 College All-Star Game he kicked four field goals and intercepted a pass in a 35-19 upset of the 1957 NFL Champion Detroit Lions. The versatile Conrad played FL, HB, WR, DB for the Chicago/St. Louis Cardinals from 1958-1968 and the Dallas Cowboys in 1969. Conrad was moved to flanker in 1962 and the next season made All-NFL when he led league with 73 catches. He came within a game of breaking the NFL record for consecutive games with a reception when he had a string of 93 from 1961 to 1968. The 6'2, 195 lb. Conrad was also selected to play in the 1965 Pro Bowl. He finished his career as the Cardinals all-time reception leader and had 422 catches for 5,902 yards and 38 touchdowns. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2002.
Name:  
Conradt, Jody
City:  
Goldthwaite
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Jody Conradt began her illustrious basketball career as an outstanding player at Goldthwaite High School where she averaged 40 points per game. Conradt has been the head women's basketball coach at the University of Texas since 1976 with her teams won 10 Southwest Conference titles and 9 post season tourney crowns. She has a career record of 900-306 that includes four seasons at Sam Houston State, three at Texas-Arlington and 31 seasons at the University of Texas. She has been named National Coach of the Year four times (1980, 1984, 1986, 1997). Her 1986 team was the first in NCAA history to go undefeated (34-0) and win the National Championship. She retired on March 12, 2007 ranking second on the all-time Division I victories list behind only Pat Summitt of Tennessee. Conradt is a member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame and the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. She was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1997.
Name:  
Coody, Charles
City:  
Stamford
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
CHARLES COODY. Stamford, Texas native Charles Coody was the 1954 Class A golf state champion. He was also an all-state basketball player in 1955. Charles Coody led Stamford High School to the 1954 Class A team golf title and was also the individual champion that year. He qualified for the 1960 and 1961 U.S. Open as an amateur. After turning pro in 1963 he won three events on the PGA Tour. His biggest victory was the 1971 Masters. Coody birdied two of the last four holes to finish with a 279, to defeat Jack Nicklaus and Johnny Miller by 2 strokes. Coody was also a member of the victorious 1971 U.S. Ryder Cup team at Old Warson in St. Louis, Missouri. Coody has five wins on the Champions Tour and has made 18 holes-in-one as a professional. Coody retired from active competition after the 2006 Masters Tournament. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2000.
Name:  
Cooper, Cynthia
City:  
Chicago, IL
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
CYNTHIA COOPER. Before joining the Houston Comets in 1997, Cynthia Cooper had a stellar career for the USC Trojans. While playing guard from 1982 to 1986, she scored 1,559 career points and helped the Lady Trojans win back-to-back NCAA titles in 1982 and 1983. She continued her career in Europe with Segovia in Spain and Parma & Alcamo in Italy from 1986 to 1997. During that time, she won her league's scoring title in eight of ten seasons. As the catalyst for the Houston Comets from 1997-2000, Cooper led her team to the WNBA's first four championship titles (1997-2000). She was also named MVP of the WNBA Finals four consecutive years. Her other numerous honors include being named All-WNBA four times, being voted to three All-Star games and earning the league's MVP award in 1997 and 1998. Cooper led the WNBA in scoring three times and became the first player in league history to score 2,000 points. She averaged 21 points, 4.9 assists and 3.3 rebounds per game during her career. A member of the WNBA's 2006 All-Decade Team, she was also a member of the medal-winning USA Women's Olympic Basketball teams in 1988 and 1992. After a brief coaching stint with Phoenix Mercury, she returned to the Comets in 2003 at age 40, becoming the oldest woman, at the time, to ever play in a WNBA game. In 2011, she was selected as one of the top 15 players in WNBA history. Beginning in May 2005, Cooper spent five seasons as the head coach at Prairie View A&M and then two seasons as the head coach at UNC Wilmington. In April 2012, she was named the head coach at Texas Southern. Cooper, a 2009 inductee into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame and a 2010 member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, also founded the Mary Cobb Building Dreams Foundation in honor of her late mother.
Name:  
Coulter, Dewitt
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dewitt "Tex" Coulter was a star football player for Masonic Home in the 1940s. Coulter, a three time all-state tackle (1940-42), led Masonic Home to a 34-5-1 record and three district titles in high school. A two-time state champion in the shot put, he also set a national high school record with a throw of 59'-1" in 1943. After enrolling at West Point, Coulter earned All-America honors at tackle on Army's 1945 National Championship team. He played left tackle for the New York Giants from 1946-1952 making the All-Pro team in 1948 and 1949. Coulter also played four seasons with Montreal in the Canadian Football League (1953-1956). He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1997.
Name:  
Couples, Fred
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
A native of Seattle, Washington, professional golfer Fred Couples rose to stardom at the University of Houston. By 1992 he had elevated himself to the No. 1 ranked professional player in the world. Couples has won 15 PGA Tours, two European tours and four Champion Tour events. Couples graduated from O'Dea High School in Seattle and played for the Houston Cougar's golf team from 1977-1980, earning All-American honors his last two years. Turning professional in 1980, he had his first PGA Tour victory in 1983 at the Kemper Open. Playing along side pro golfers Scott Simpson and T.C. Chen, the three finished their match over an hour later than the prior group. In the end, Couples scored a birdie to win his first PGA title. Taking home the Byron Nelson in 1987, his golf career was right on track. In 1991 and 1992 Couples was named PGA Tour Player of the Year, gaining five PGA victories in two years and winning the Masters in 1992. He stayed atop the No. 1 World Ranking for 16 weeks, winning the Nissan Los Angeles Open and the Nestle Invitational. "When you're prepared, you're more confident," said Couples. "When you have a strategy, you're more comfortable." From 1991-95, Couples achieved five separate national victories across the world: the Johnnie Walker World Championship in '91 and '95, World Cup, Dubai Desert Classic, and the Johnnie Walker Classic. He enjoys visiting the UK, traveling for the first time in 1984. He tied for 3rd place twice at St. Andrews in 1991 and 2005. From 1992-95 he paired with Davis Love III to win a record-breaking four consecutive World Cup of Golf titles. In November 1995 he recorded back-to-back victories on the PGA European Tour, being the first to do so since Charles Coody in 1973. This was also a milestone moment for Couples - - the first time in his career to have consecutive wins. In 2003 he also placed first in the Shell Houston Open, marking his first win in five years. Couples competed in The Masters again in April 2006, hoping to earn his second green jacket, but fell short against Phil Mickelson. Although he came in second place, he felt completely confident in his ability to compete. "I expect myself to do well. I'm not, like, 'Oh, well. I'm not in that category just yet,'" said Couples. "I know I can still do it." Couples is still one of the best players on Tour. He was chosen as Presidents Cup captain in 2009, leading the United States to victory. In 2010, Couples made his first appearance in the Champions Tours' opening event, the Mitsubishi Electric Championship. He placed second, barely falling short behind Tom Watson, but won his next three events, the ACE Group Classic, Toshiba Classic and the Cap Cana Championship. He became the first player in Champions Tour history to win three of his first four career events. Couples has made an everlasting mark in the world of golf and continues to be respected among all players of the game. Inducted into the National Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame in 2007, he is now a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame (Class of 2011).
Name:  
Crenshaw, Ben
City:  
Austin
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
BEN CRENSHAW. Ben Crenshaw, was one of the best putters to ever play on the PGA Tour. A member of the tour since 1973 Crenshaw has 19 tour titles, including the 1973 Texas Open - his first appearance as a pro. Crenshaw's other victories include the 1983 Byron Nelson, 1984 Masters, 1990 Southwestern Bell Colonial and the 1995 Masters. Crenshaw played on four Ryder Cup teams (1981, 1983, 1987, 1995) and captained the victorious 1999 team which made the biggest comeback in the event's history. The US team won 8 singles points on the final day to come back from four points down. Along with teammate Tom Kite he led the University of Texas to consecutive NCAA titles (1971-72). Crenshaw was individual champion in 1971 and '73 and shared the crown with Kite in 1972. The USGA presented him with its highest honor in 1992, the Bob Jones Award. He is now playing on the Champions Tour where he has one win from the 2009 Wendy's Champions Skins Game. Crenshaw was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.
Name:  
Crow, John David
City:  
Springhill, Louisiana
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
John David Crow's career led him from Springhill, La., to playing fame at Texas A&M, to the pros, and back to Louisiana as a coach. As an Aggie senior in 1957, Crow was a unanimous All-America halfback, the Heisman Trophy winner, and was named Player of the Year by the Walter Camp Foundation and the Washington Touchdown Club. He was voted Back of the Year by United Press International. He also became the No. 1 pick in the pro draft by the (then) Chicago Cardinals. He played 11 seasons in the NFL and appeared in four Pro Bowls. Paul "Bear" Bryant once called Crow "the greatest all-around back I ever coached." After his playing career, Crow coached at Alabama and for Cleveland and San Diego in the NFL before becoming head coach at Northeast Louisiana. He later became the athletic director at Texas A&M. Crow was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1982.
Name:  
Curtis, Albert
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Albert "Abb" Curtis earned respect and admiration during his half-century career as a player, coach, official, and administrator. At Fort Worth Central High School, later known as Paschal, he starred in football, basketball, and baseball. During his senior year at the University of Texas, he played on undefeated teams in football and basketball and was the school's No. 1 scholar-athlete. After graduation, he served as head football coach at Fort Worth Central High School for three years before concentrating on officiating football and basketball. He officiated in some of the most important games in Southwest Conference history, including the 1935 Rose Bowl game between SMU and Stanford and the 1939 Sugar Bowl in which national champion TCU defeated Carnegie Tech. He later served as the supervisor of Southwest Conference football and basketball officials and assistant to the executive secretary for 17 years. Curtis was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1973.
Name:  
Curtis, Eck
City:  
Vernon
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Eck Curtis, a four-sport athlete form Vernon, quarterbacked Abilene Christian's first football team in 1923 before embarking on a legendary coaching career. Curtis compiled a 20-year record of 168 wins, 47 losses and 14 ties as a high school coach. His first job was at Anson in 1925, and later he coached successful teams at Ranger, Electra, and Breckenridge. Eck's 10-year record at Breckenridge was 83-22-6 with a state quarterfinalist in 1938 and semifinalist in 1942. In 1945, he moved to Highland Park and guided the Scots to a 12-0-2 record and the state co-championship with Waco. The 7-7 tie in the finals attracted a then record high school crowd of 45,790 into the Cotton Bowl. After one season at Highland Park, he began a nine-year stint (1946-1954) as offensive backfield coach at the University of Texas. Curtis later served 10 years as athletic director of the Lubbock school system. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1985.
Name:  
Dale, Jack
City:  
Lubbock
School:  
Sport:  
Media
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Perhaps Jack Dale has been listened to by more West Texans than any other in his 50-plus years of service to Texas Tech. He broadcast 520 Red Raider football games for 47 years and more than 1,350 men's basketball games for 50 years. Jack grew up on a Kansas farm and would broadcast imaginary games while on the family tractor. He graduated from Kansas City's Pathfinder School of Radio Announcing in 1952 and then sent 115 letters out for a job. He and his wife, Sue, settled on KFYO in Lubbock. When the Humble Football Network obtained the radio broadcast rights for Tech football games in 1953, Jack became a part of the network, broadcasting with Eddie Barker, Eddie Hall and Connie Alexander. He was not allowed to broadcast many Tech games because if listeners perceived of a bias, they would send the Humble credit cards back to the Houston-based company in protest, he said. In 1992, Jack and his son, Steve, started a radio call-in show in Lubbock. Jack Dale died in 2011. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2005.
Name:  
Davis, Walter
City:  
Nederland
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
In spite of a childhood bout with Polio Walter "Buddy" Davis excelled in basketball and high jumping. In high school, his basketball success led him to the North-South All-Star Game where he was voted the outstanding player. By his senior year, he had won the district and regional high-jump titles. At Texas A&M in 1952, Davis helped the Aggies win their first Southwest Conference basketball championship in 30 years. Meanwhile, he was developing into a world-class high-jumper. As a junior, Davis won the Texas Relays and tied for second at the NCAA meet. In his senior year, he won the conference championship by setting a new Texas Relay record, tied for the NCAA title, set a new AAU mark and concluded his career with a gold medal at the 1952 Olympics with a record jump of 6 feet 8 inches. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1964.
Name:  
Dawson, Carroll
City:  
Alba, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Basketball has taken Carroll Dawson from the fields of Alba, Texas to the top of one of the NBA's premier franchises. Dawson has been the General Manager of the Houston Rockets since 1996. "CD" was an assistant under four different Rocket coaches from 1980-1996 and is the only person in the franchise to coach on all four of the Rockets' trips to the NBA Finals -1981, 1986, 1994 and 1995. Dawson specialized in coaching the team's frontcourt players and is credited with teaching Hakeem Olajuwon the jump hook. He is also responsible for helping put together the WNBA's most successful team-the Houston Comets. He hired coach Van Chancellor and signed key players Sheryl Swoopes, Cynthia Cooper and Tina Thompson. The Comets won four consecutive WNBA titles from 1997-2000. Dawson was an All-American at Paris Jr. College and made the All-SWC team at Baylor in 1960. He was the head basketball coach at Baylor University from 1973-1977. As general manager of the Rockets Dawson was also responsible for bringing some of the NBA's best players to Houston like Scottie Pippen, Charles Barkley, Steve Francis, Tracy McGrady and Yao Ming. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2003.
Name:  
Demaret, James
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
James "Jimmy" Demaret was one of the most popular players in golf history. Known for his flamboyant dress and splendid singing voice, he became the first man to win the Masters championship three times. He also had a perfect 6-0 record while playing on three U.S. Ryder Cup teams (1947, 1949, 1951). Demaret won 31 tour victories and in 1947 won the Varden Trophy. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1957 and the PGA Hall of Fame in 1960. After retiring from professional tournament golf, Demaret co-hosted the Shell Wonderful World of Golf on television. He also devoted much of his time to operating Champions Golf Club, which he and Jack Burke, Jr. a fellow golf pro, established in Houston in 1958. Demaret was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1961.
Name:  
Detmer, Ty
City:  
San Antonio, TX
School:  
Brigham Young University
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2015
Heisman Trophy winning quarterback Ty Detmer began his career playing high school football for his father, coach Sonny Detmer at San Antonio's Southwest High School. Detmer earned all-state honors while leading the nation in passing as a senior in 1986 with 3,357 yards. He threw for 8,005 yards and 71 touchdowns during his prep career. In college Detmer found the perfect fit for his talents at BYU (1987-1991) in coach LaVell Edwards' quarterback friendly offense. Detmer was a two-time all-American at BYU passing for 15,031 yards and 121 touchdowns during his career. In 1990 Detmer, as a junior, put together one of the finest seasons in college football history throwing for an NCAA-record 5,188 yards and 41 touchdowns. He won every major award that season including the Heisman, Maxwell and Davey O'Brien trophies. The Cougars were invited to four bowl games and compiled a record of 37-13-2 during the Detmer years, including a 28-21 victory over top-ranked Miami on September 8, 1990 in Provo, one of the biggest wins in BYU history. Detmer broke 59 NCAA records and tied three others. In 14 seasons in the NFL he threw for 6,351 yards and 34 TDs while playing for Green Bay, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Cleveland, Detroit & Atlanta. Detmer was inducted into the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame in 1997 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 2015.
Name:  
Dickerson, Eric
City:  
Sealy
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Sealy native Eric Dickerson led his school to the 1978 2A state championship with a 42-20 victory over Wylie. Dickerson set a championship game record with 296 yards and four touchdowns. A two-time All-America selection at SMU from 1979-1982, he rushed for 4,450 yards, third most in Southwest Conference history. Dickerson had a record breaking NFL career with the Los Angeles Rams, Indianapolis Colts, Los Angeles Raiders and Atlanta Falcons (1983-1993). In 1984 he set the single season NFL rushing record with 2,105 yards. Dickerson made six Pro Bowls and in 1985 rushed for a playoff record 248 yards against the Dallas Cowboys. At the time of his retirement, his 13,259 yards was second on the all-time list. Dickerson was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.
Name:  
Dierker, Larry
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Larry Dierker pitched for the Houston Astros from 1964-1976. Dierker made his debut for Houston in 1964 at the age of 18. In 1969 he became the first Astro to win 20 games in a season. He is the Astros all-time leader in starts (320), complete games, innings (2,295), and shutouts (25). In 1979 Dierker was hired as the Astros' radio and TV color commentator. In 1997 the Astros promoted Dierker from the broadcaster's booth to manager. He managed the team from 1997-2001 winning National League Manager of the Year in 1998 and leading the club to four NL Central titles. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1998.
Name:  
Dillon, Bobby
City:  
Temple
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Temple native Bobby Dillon was an All-American safety for the 1951 SWC Champion Texas Longhorns. Dillon, who served as co-captain of that team, returned 20 punts for 276 yards and intercepted five passes. Dillon played in the NFL with the Green Bay Packers from 1952-1959 and was selected to four Pro Bowls. He retired as the Packers' career interception leader with 52. A member of the Green Bay Packer Hall of Fame, he was also selected to the Packers' 75th Anniversary Team. Dillon was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1996.
Name:  
Disch, William
City:  
Austin
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
William J. "Uncle Billy" Disch served the University of Texas as baseball coach for 29 years (1911-1939), during which time his Longhorns earned the reputation as one of the finest college baseball programs in the nation. During his long career, Disch produced 27 championship teams, including four in the old Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association and 20 out of a possible 25 in the Southwest Conference. His all-time coaching record was a phenomenal 512 victories and 180 losses for a career winning percentage of .740. Eighteen of Disch's players were enshrined into the Longhorn Hall of Honor as a result of his influence. The Disch-Falk baseball field at UT is partially named in his honor. Disch was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1954.
Name:  
Dodds, DeLoss
City:  
Riley, KS
School:  
Sport:  
Administration
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
DELOSS DODDS. As the architect of the state's most successful collegiate athletic program, DeLoss Dodds' success at the University of Texas is unparalleled. Dodds has been the Longhorn's Athletic Director since 1981, the longest tenure in the school's history. Dodds' Longhorn teams have won 13 national championships and 100 conference (SWC & Big 12) titles. During his reign each of the nine men's sports has won a conference crown. This string of athletic success includes 21 bowl games, 18 NCAA basketball bids, three NCAA baseball titles with 13 College World Series trips, 10 NCAA Swimming & Diving titles, 18 NCAA tennis tournament trips, 14 NCAA top 10 finishes in golf and 20 conference indoor/outdoor titles in track & field. In 1984 Dodds streamlined the fundraising for the athletic department by bringing everything under the control of the Longhorn Foundation. He is also responsible for raising the $300 million necessary to renovate the DKR Memorial Stadium, Erwin Center, Moncrief-Neuhaus Athletic Center and the Cooley Pavilion for basketball. He was also a key figure in the formation of the Big 12 Conference. Dodds recently received the 2006 John L. Toner Award as nation's top Athletic Director from the College Football Hall of Fame. He was inducted as part of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame's Class of 2006.
Name:  
Drexler, Clyde
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Houston native Clyde Drexler was an All-American at the University of Houston while leading the Cougars to the 1983 Final Four and a number one ranking. Drexler had a 15 year NBA career with the Portland Trailblazers and the Houston Rockets. He was the third player in NBA history to amass 20,000 points, 6,000 rebounds and 6,000 assists. Drexler was selected to 10 NBA All-Star Teams and was a member of the 1996 U.S. Olympic gold medal "Dream Team". After leading the Portland Trailblazers to the NBA Finals in 1990 and 1992, Drexler won the championship as a member of the Houston Rockets. In 1996 he was named as one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history. Drexler was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1998.
Name:  
Dyer, Eddie
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Edwin "Eddie" Dyer was a three-sport athlete at Rice University where he was captain of the football and baseball teams his senior year and holder of the 1921 Southwest Conference long-jump record. After graduation, he joined the St. Louis Cardinals, signing a contract for the unheard-of bonus of $5,000. After six seasons as pitcher, Dyer became the Cardinals' top developer of talent and one of the most successful coaches in minor-league baseball. As a reward, Dyer was asked to manage the 1946 Cardinals, who went on to win the World Series. Dyer's career record (1946-1950) as a manager for the Cardinals was 446-325. After retiring from coaching, Dyer sponsored one of Houston's first Little League teams and took part in bringing National League baseball to his hometown. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1966.
Name:  
Dykes, Spike
City:  
Lubbock, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Spike Dykes began his illustrious 41-year coaching career as a small town Texas high school football coach. He had successful teams at Coahoma, Belton, Big Spring and Alice. From 1972-1979, he served as an assistant at Texas, New Mexico and Mississippi State. He then returned to Texas to coach at Midland Lee where he compiled a 34-12 record from 1980-1983. Dykes joined Texas Tech in 1984 as an assistant and took over the head job in 1986. During his 13-year tenure (1986-1999) he led the Red Raiders to six bowl games, including a thrilling 55-41 victory over Air Force in the 1995 Copper Bowl. He was named Southwest Conference Coach of the Year three times, won a SWC title and coached nine first team All-Americans. Other accomplishments include the 78 team or individual records that were set during his reign, and becoming the first coach to have two Doak Walker Award winners. In 1996, he was named the first ever Big 12 Coach of the Year. Dykes retired with more wins (82) than any coach in Texas Tech history. Dykes is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2007.
Name:  
Elkins, Lawrence
City:  
Brownwood, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Lawrence Elkins began his football career playing for legendary Brownwood High School coach Gordon Wood. In the 1960 3A state championship game, Elkins caught a touchdown pass for the Lions to help seal a 26-6 victory over Port Lavaca. At Baylor University he continued his pass catching ways by earning All-SWC and All-American honors in 1963 & 1964. Elkins thrived under Coach John Bridgers pro-style offense making 144 career receptions at Baylor for 2,094 yards & 19 touchdowns. In 1963 he led the nation and also set a SWC record with 70 receptions for 873 yards and eight touchdowns. Elkins played in the 1965 East West Shrine Game, Coaches All-America Game & was Most Valuable Player of the Hula Bowl. He later played in the AFL with the Houston Oilers from 1965-1968 before injuries ended his career. Elkins was selected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1994. Elkins is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2009.
Name:  
Elkins, Wilson
City:  
San Antonio
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dr. Wilson Elkins excelled in high school and college sports. He became an all-around athlete at Brackenridge High School in San Antonio and played on its state championship basketball team in 1926. He continued participating in three sports at Schreiner Institute before attending the University of Texas in 1928. He earned eight letters at Texas by quarterbacking the 1930 championship football team, captaining the 1932 basketball team, and lettering twice in track and field. Elkins still found time to graduate with two degrees and become a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University. He was later president at the University of Texas at El Paso and the University of Maryland. Elkins was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1963.
Name:  
English, Doug
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
1973 & 1974
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2014
Dallas native Doug English began his football career at Bryan Adams High School where he was a member of Coach & Athlete Magazine’s Prep All-America team. The 6’5”, 255 lb. English was a two-time All-SWC defensive tackle at the University of Texas in 1973 and 1974 and was also selected to the All-America team as a senior in 1974. He helped lead Coach Royal’s Longhorns to SWC titles in 1972 & 1973 and was later voted to the University of Texas All-Century Team. English played 10 seasons in the NFL with the Detroit Lions from 1975-1985 (he briefly retired for the 1980 season). He made All-Pro four-times (1978, 1981, 1982, 1983) and was also selected to play in four Pro Bowls (1979, 1982-1984). English had 59 career sacks including 13 in 1983. That season Detroit’s “Silver Rush” defense helped the team win its first NFC central division title. During his 131 game professional career he recorded a record four safeties. English is a member of the Detroit Lions All-Time Team and was inducted in the University of Texas Hall of Honor in 1986. He is also a member of the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame (1997). In 2000 he started the Lone Star Paralysis Foundation. English was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2011 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2014.
Name:  
Falk, Bibb
City:  
Austin
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Austin native Bibb Falk could have been honored by the Texas Sports Hall of Fame for his baseball talents or his career as a college baseball coach. The hard-hitting outfielder went straight from the University of Texas to the Chicago White Sox in 1920 where he replaced "Shoeless" Joe Jackson in leftfield after the infamous "Black Sox Scandal". Known as "Jockey" for his verbal riding of opposing player during games, Falk played nine years with the Chicago White Sox (1920-1928) and three with Cleveland Indians (1929-1931). He produced a .314 career batting average that peaked in 1924 when he hit .352. Falk succeeded Billy Disch, his former coach, at the University of Texas in 1940. His teams won 20 conference titles in his 25 years as coach, including national championships at the College World Series in 1949 and 1950. Disch-Falk Field at the University of Texas was named in honor of a half-century of service by both coaches. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1961.
Name:  
Fallon, Frank
City:  
Waco
School:  
Sport:  
Media
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
A native of El Paso who grew up in San Antonio, Frank became known as "the Voice of the Baylor Bears." Fallon began his broadcasting career at age 18 at KITE in San Antonio. Following his graduation from Baylor in 1953, he joined Waco's KWTX station and worked there for 28 years. Frank was play-by-play announcer for Baylor football and basketball for 42 years. He spent 20 years as the PA announcer for NCAA men's basketball Final Fours. He also performed television broadcasts for NBC and ESPN. A broadcast journalism instructor in his later years, Fallon received the Chris Schenkel Award, honoring lifetime excellence and community contributions. Fallon was the 2001 recipient of the Baylor Communications Award. Five times he was named the Texas Association of Broadcasters' "Sportscaster of the Year." Frank is in the Baylor Hall of Honor and the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame. Fallon passed away in 2004. The annual Frank Fallon Sportsmanship Award is sponsored by the Waco Chamber of Commerce. Fallon was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2005.
Name:  
Ford, T. J.
City:  
Houston, Texas
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
2016
Houston, Texas, native T.J. Ford is one of the most decorated athletes in the University of Texas’s basketball history. Before Ford even stepped on campus, his basketball career was full of countless accomplishments as a point guard at Texas 5A high school Sugar Land Willowridge. From 1999 to 2001, his high school team compiled a 75–1 record (including a 62-game winning streak) earning a pair of Texas Class 5A state titles resulting in a McDonald’s High School All-American selection for Ford. The moment Ford put on the burnt orange jersey for the Texas Longhorns, he immediately was a star player for the Longhorns. He was recognized as the USBWA Freshman of the Year in addition to being first-team All-Big 12 and Big 12 Freshman of the Year in 2002. Ford’s sophomore season at Texas was one for the history books as he led Texas to the Final Four averaging 15 points, 7.7 assists and 3.9 rebounds per game. The incredible season resulted in Naismith Player of Year, Wooden Player of Year, Sporting News Player of the Year, consensus first-team All-American, first-team All-Big 12 and Big 12 Player of the Year honors for Ford. He went on to average 11.2 points, 5.8 assists and 3.1 rebounds over his 9-year NBA career (Milwaukee 2003-06, Toronto 2006-08, Indiana 2008-11 and San Antonio 2011-12). Despite injuries shortening his NBA career, Ford is undoubtedly one of greatest players to come out of the state of Texas.
Name:  
Foreman, George
City:  
Marshall
School:  
Sport:  
Boxing
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
After only 22 amateur fights George Foreman burst upon the boxing world by winning the gold medal at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. In one of the longest professional careers in boxing history (1969-1997) Foreman posted a 76-5 record with 68 knockouts. The native of Marshall, Texas, won the undisputed heavyweight world championship in 1973 with a second-round KO over Joe Frazier in Kingston, Jamaica. After losing the crown to Muhammad Ali in 1974, Foreman went into retirement only to return in 1987 at the age of 38. On November 5, 1994 the 45 year-old Foreman became the oldest man to win the heavyweight crown when he knocked out defending WBA/IBF champ Michael Moorer in the 10th round. George Foreman was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.
Name:  
Foster, Andrew
City:  
Calvert
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
At the time of his death in 1930 Calvert, Texas native Andrew "Rube" Foster was the most powerful man in black baseball. He was an outstanding pitcher, earning the nickname "Rube" by once defeating Rube Waddell and the Philadelphia Athletics in an exhibition game. In 1903 he won four of the seven games in the Negro World Series for the Cuban X Giants. After leading the Chicago Leland Giants to much success he took over the Chicago American Giants, whom Foster promoted as "The Greatest Aggregation of Colored Baseball Players in the World." Foster's teams were known for their smart, aggressive style of play. In 1920 Foster founded the Negro National League which flourished until his death in 1930, the league's motto was "We Are the Ship, All Else the Sea." Foster was elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1981 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1998.
Name:  
Foster, Willie
City:  
Calvert
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Willie "Bill" Foster, a native of Calvert, Texas and half-brother of Negro National League founder "Rube" Foster won 137 games as a Negro League pitcher from 1923-1937. Foster pitched for the Memphis Red Sox, Chicago American Giants, Homestead Grays, Kansas City Monarchs, Cole's American Giants, Birmingham Black Barons and the Pittsburgh Crawfords. Foster, often referred to as the "black Lefty Grove", pitched the West team to a complete game victory in the inaugural East-West All-Star Game in 1933. He led the Chicago American Giants to the Negro World Series in 1926 and 1927. Foster was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1996 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1998.
Name:  
Foyt, A.J.
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Auto Racing
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
In few sports has an athlete exhibited the dominance achieved by A.J. Foyt in auto racing. From 1953 to 1981, Foyt won more than 155 races in all types of racing automobiles, including victories in 67 Indy-car races, 41 stock-car races, 28 sprint-car races, and 20 midget-car races. He was the first man to win auto racing's Triple Crown--the Indianapolis 500, which he won four times (1961, 1964, 1967, 1977); the Pocono 500, which he won three times and the Ontario 500, which he won once. In the Indy 500, Foyt was the only driver to win in both a front-engine and a rear-engine racecar. He also won the U.S. Auto Club national championship more than any other racer when he achieved his seventh title in 1979. By the end of his career in auto racing, Foyt had won more races than anyone in the history of the sport. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1967. In 1999 A.J. Foyt and Mario Andretti were named Co-Drivers of the Century by the Associated Press.
Name:  
Fry, Hayden
City:  
Odessa
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
A former state championship quarterback from Odessa High School (1946), Hayden Fry was the head football coach at SMU (1962-1972) and North Texas State (1973-1978) before taking the job at Iowa (1979-1998). Fry broke the color barrier in the SWC when he awarded Jerry LeVias a scholarship to SMU in 1966. The winningest coach in Iowa football history, Fry's 20-season record was 143-89-6. Under Fry the Hawkeyes won Big Ten championships in 1982, 1986 and 1991. He is a three-time Big Ten Coach of the Year and has twice been named National Coach of the Year. After 37 seasons his career record stands at 232-178-10 and includes trips to 17 bowl games. Fry is also a past president of the American Football Coaches Association. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1997.
Name:  
Gardner, J. Alvin
City:  
Beaumont
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Longtime baseball executive J. Alvin Gardner steered the Texas League through the tough times of the Depression and World War II to attendance records which still stand. His Texas League affiliation began in 1920 when he and his partners bought the Waco club and moved it to Wichita Falls. Gardner became sole owner of the franchise in 1925. His 1927 Texas League champion Wichita Falls Spudders won 102 games and then swept New Orleans in four games to win the Dixie Series. Gardner was President of the Texas League from 1930-1953. Under his guidance the Texas League developed into the dominant Class AA operation in the country, drawing a record of 1.6 million fans in 1946. Gardner was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1994.
Name:  
Garrido, Augie
City:  
Vallejo, CA
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Since taking over as the University of Texas baseball coach in 1997, Augie Garrido has led the Longhorns to two national championships. Garrido is the NCAA all-time win leader among Divison I college baseball coaches with 1,817-825-8 record through 43 seasons (through 2011). His historic 1,428th victory came in a 6-5 win against Florida State in the NCAA Super Regional on June 9, 2003. His teams have won five national championships and he is the only coach to win the College World Series in four different decades (1979, 1984, 1995 with Cal State Fullerton; 2002 and 2005 with Texas). Garrido is also the first coach to win a national championship at two different schools. Other accomplishments during his 14-year stint at Texas include seven Big 12 regular season titles, including a three-year stretch from 2009-2011; four Big 12 Tournament titles (2002-03; 2008-09); and seven trips to the College World Series in the past 12 seasons. A respected teacher of the game, Garrido has coached three Golden Spikes Award winners, three National Players of the Year, six College World Series MVPs, 41 All-Americans, 127 All-League selections and 73 professional players. Garrido has been named National Coach of the Year six times, most recently in 2002 and 2005. He was also named Big 12 Coach of the Year in 2002, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2010 and 2011, and was selected by Collegiate Baseball as Coach of the Year in 2005. The Vallejo, Calif., native and Fresno State graduate was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2005.
Name:  
Garrison, Walt
City:  
Lewisville, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Lewisville's Walt Garrison played for Oklahoma State as a 6', 205 lb. fullback from 1963-1965. Garrison was named to the 1964 All-Academic Team, and in the following season, he led the Big Eight in rushing yards, was an All-Big Eight selection, and was named Outstanding Back in the 1965 Senior Bowl. After college, Garrison began his nine-year NFL career in Dallas where he played in the Cowboys' backfield from 1966-74 under coach Tom Landry. He was a member of the 1971 World Champion Cowboys team and was a 1972 Pro-Bowl selection. Garrison retired with 3,886 career rushing yards and 1,794 receiving yards, which at the time ranked third and fourth respectively in all-time Dallas Cowboys history. He was selected to the Dallas Cowboys 25th Anniversary Team and is a member of the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the Class of 2012.
Name:  
Garrison, Zina
City:  
Houston, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Tennis
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Zina Garrison began her illustrious career at Houston's MacGregor Park with help from coach John Wilkerson. A tennis professional from 1982-93, Garrison was ranked in the WTA Top 20 for 14 years. In 1989 her ranking climbed to No. 4 in the world after she defeated Chris Evert at the U.S. Open and advanced to the semifinals. Garrison won 14 career singles titles and 20 career doubles titles. In 1990 at Wimbledon she became the first African-American woman since Althea Gibson (1958) to play in a Grand Slam Final. Garrison won two medals at the 1988 Olympics - gold in the doubles with Pam Shriver and a bronze in the singles. She served as head coach for the USA National Team (1999) U.S. Olympic team and the United States FedCup Team from 2004 to present. Among her many charitable activities she was the founder, President and Player Development Coach at the Zina Garrison All Court Tennis Academy for inner city youth in Houston since 1993. She is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Class of 2005.
Name:  
Gay, Don
City:  
Mesquite
School:  
Sport:  
Rodeo
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Mesquite, Texas native Don Gay won a record eight bull riding titles from 1974 to 1984. He broke the old record of seven held by his idol Jim Shoulders on December 12, 1976. A twelve- time qualifier for the National Finals Rodeo, Gay set a NFR record with a score of 95 on a bull named Red One. In 1974 Gay broke Shoulders' 20 year-old record for money earned during a season with $28,700. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1996.
Name:  
Gervin, George
City:  
San Antonio
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Currently ranked eighth on the all-time NBA scoring list with 26,595 points, San Antonio Spurs legend George Gervin played in 12 straight All-Star games from 1974 to 1985 and won four scoring titles. "The Iceman" is considered by many to be the greatest player in Spurs history and his #44 jersey is one of two jersey's retired by the franchise. Gervin was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1996.
Name:  
Gilstrap, Claude R.
City:  
Granger
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The coaching career of Claude Robbins Gilstrap began in 1937 with high school stops in Leverett's Chapel, Crockett, Wharton and Cleburne. He served as head coach at Paris Junior College, 1948-49, and the next two years at Schreiner Institute. He moved to what was then two-year Arlington State as head coach and athletic director in 1952. His teams won consecutive Junior Rose Bowl games in Pasadena beginning in 1956. The '57 ASC squad was undefeated and ranked No. 1 nationally among junior colleges. Gilstrap guided the UT-Arlington program to four-year status in 1959. He coached through the 1965 season and remained as athletic director until 1975. His record as a head coach was 162-88-9 overall, 115-60-4 at the collegiate level. The UT-Austin graduate was a noted after-dinner speaker. Gilstrap was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1994.
Name:  
Glass, Bill
City:  
Corpus Christi
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The 6'6 225 lb. Glass was an All-American lineman at Baylor in 1956. After a year in the Canadian Football League with Saskatchewan, Glass played 11 seasons in the NFL with Detroit and Cleveland. In 1964 Glass was a member of the Browns team that beat Baltimore for the NFL Championship 27-0. A four-time Pro Bowl selection, Glass retired in 1969 to form the Bill Glass Evangelistic Association. Glass started a prison ministry program in 1972. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1987.
Name:  
Goldman, David
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
David "Spec" Goldman won 165 amateur tournaments on two continents in seven decades of competition. He won the world Seniors Championship twice, won the Mexican and Texas amateur titles, the Colonial Invitational at Memphis, Tenn., and the Life Begins at Forty Tournament. In addition, he went to the finals of the Trans-Mississippi Amateur, the French Amateur, the Western Amateur, and the USGA Seniors on two occasions. For more than 20 years he served in USGA junior promotion and served two terms as president of both the Dallas Golf Association and the Dallas County Seniors Golf Association. Goldman was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1978.
Name:  
Graham, Wayne
City:  
Yoakum, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
WAYNE GRAHAM. Wayne Graham is the winningest baseball coach in Rice history (1992-present). His Owls won the 2003 College World Series defeating Stanford 14-2 and capping a 58-12 season. That victory brought Rice its first National Championship in school history. As of 2010 the Houston native's impressive resume at Rice includes seven College World Series appearances and 14 consecutive conference baseball titles - SWC (1996), Conference USA (1997-99) and WAC (2000-2010) and a career record of 1,362-412. At San Jacinto Jr. College (1981-91) he won five national titles in 11 seasons and had a 574-113 record. Graham was voted National Junior College Coach of the Year five times. Baseball America named Graham its Junior College Coach of the Century, Coach of the Decade for the 1980s and NCAA Coach of the Year in 1999. He played college baseball for legendary coach Bibb Falk at the University of Texas. Graham then played 11 years of pro baseball with the Philadelphia Phillies and New York Met organizations. Graham hit .300 or better in six of his 10 minor league stops and was named Texas minor league player of the year in 1962. Graham began his illustrious career as a high school coach at Scarborough and Spring Branch high schools compiling a 98-13 record.
Name:  
Gray, Jack
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Jack Gray began his career in basketball as a star athlete for the University of Texas before eventually becoming coach there. He was the first UT athlete to be selected for All-America honors and pioneered the one-handed turn shot. He also led the Southwest Conference in scoring for three years (1933-1935), during which time he scored a record 1,108 points and led the Longhorns to a record of 52-16. He took over the head-coaching job at Texas only one year after completing his college eligibility. He coached for six seasons (1937-42), and won the SWC title with his 1939 team. After serving in the Navy during World War II Gray returned to coach six more seasons at Texas. During his 12 seasons at UT, Gray's teams compiled a 194-97 record and won three Southwest Conference championships. His finest team finished third in the nation in 1947. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1964.
Name:  
Gray, Ken
City:  
San Saba, Texas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
2016
Ken Gray is considered one of the best offensive linemen in the early days of the NFL in the 1960s. Gray began his career at Llano High School and was a 4-year letterman (1954-57) at Howard Payne University, where he was an All-Lone Star Conference player and named to the Little All-America team. Gray was drafted in the 6th round (62nd overall pick) by the Green Bay Packers in 1958 before earning a roster spot with the Chicago Cardinals (later the St. Louis Cardinals). He was named to seven NFL Pro Bowls as an offensive guard for the St. Louis Cardinals and was a consensus All-Pro in 1963-65 and 1967. Gray was recognized as the first-team guard on the NFL’s All-1960s Team and the Cardinals' All-Time Team. He spent 12 years with the Cardinals before joining the Houston Oilers in 1970. After retiring from the NFL, Gray returned to Llano High School as the head coach (1973-75). 1973 was one of the most successful seasons in Llano history as Gray led them to the state quarterfinals. His son, Boyd Gray, was the star running back and linebacker for the team. Gray went on to be the offensive line coach for the Denver Broncos during the 1977-1978 seasons. Since the end of his playing and coaching days, Gray was inducted into the NAIA Hall of Fame and the Howard Payne Hall of Fame.
Name:  
Green, Darrell
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Houston native Darrell Green was All-State in track and All-City in football at Jones High School. At Texas A&I he was an All-American and the 1982 Lone Star Conference Defensive Player of the Year. Green played cornerback with the Washington Redskins from 1983-2002. He has been to seven Pro Bowls and has played on two Super Bowl championship teams in 1988 and 1992. 2002 was Green's 20th and final season with the Redskins, the most in team history. He also holds team records for most regular season games played (279), games started (250) and interceptions (53). At age 42 Green was the oldest cornerback to ever play in the NFL and oldest to return an interception for a TD. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2000.
Name:  
Green, Jacob
City:  
Pasadena, Texas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
2016
Green played high school football in Houston for Kashmere High School and signed with Aggie head coach Emory Bellard and earned three letters (1977-1979) for the Texas A&M football team. A two-time All-American in 1978 and 1979, Green recorded 22 tackles against Baylor in 1979 which included four quarterback sacks and ended the season with 134 total tackles. At the end of his Aggie career, Green was the all-time leader in quarterback sacks with 37 and currently is in second place behind Aaron Wallace's 42 career sacks. Green still holds the single season record of 20 sacks in the 1979 season and holds the record for fumbles caused in a career with 12. A first-round NFL draft selection by the Seattle Seahawks in 1980, Green had a stellar NFL career and is a member of the Seattle Seahawks' Ring of Honor. He recorded 116 sacks in his 12 plus seasons with the Seahawks and when he retired from the NFL, was ranked third all-time in sacks behind Reggie White and Lawrence Taylor. Green posted 12 or more sacks in a season six times in his NFL career and also intercepted three passes and returned two for touchdowns. He earned All-Pro honors in 1983 and 1984 and was a two-time Pro Bowler in 1986 and 1987. Green was inducted into the Texas A&M Letterman's Hall of Fame in 1987 and the Southwest Conference Hall of Fame in 2014. He Is currently is a vice president for major gifts and endowments for the 12th Man Foundation. In his final game at Kyle Field, Green helped lead a 13-7 upset of Top 10-ranked Texas with Aggie head coach Tom Wilson commenting, "Green spent as much time in the Texas backfield as the Longhorn running backs."
Name:  
Greene, Joe
City:  
Temple
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Temple, Texas native Joe Greene first gained national attention at North Texas State where he led his team to a three-year record of 23-5-1 and was named consensus All-American as a senior in 1968. "Mean Joe" was the No. 1 draft choice of Pittsburgh, and at the end of his first season he was named Rookie of the Year. Greene played defensive end on Pittsburgh's vaunted "Steel Curtain" defense that won four Super Bowls (1974, 1975, 1978, 1979). He was voted into the Pro Bowl a record 10 times and was a unanimous selection on the NFL's All-Decade Team of the 1970's. Greene was also a two-time Defensive Player of the Year making All-Pro in 10 of his 13 seasons. Greene was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1985.
Name:  
Gregg, Forrest
City:  
Sulphur Springs
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Forrest Gregg was the first person to participate in the Super Bowl as a player and later as a head coach. The native of Sulphur Springs was an all-SWC tackle at SMU in 1954 and 1955. With the Green Bay Packers he was an All-Pro guard for eight consecutive seasons (1960-67). During this time, the Packers won five NFL titles and the first two Super Bowls. In 14 seasons with the Packers (1956, 1958-70) Gregg appeared in a record 187 consecutive games. He later played with the Dallas Cowboys. In 1975, he became head coach of the Cleveland Browns and was named NFL Coach of the Year in 1976. He later coached at Toronto in the CFL and then Cincinnati for four seasons (1980-83), during which time he led the 1981 Bengals to a 14-2 record and to Super Bowl XVI. Gregg was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.
Name:  
Grigg, Cecil
City:  
Sherman
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
In Cecil Grigg's long career in football, he distinguished himself as a player and a coach. Grigg played quarterback for the Canton Bulldogs for four years, winning three world pro titles (1920, 1922, and 1923). He won another pro title in 1927 with the New York Giants before retiring from pro football. The following year, he was named head football coach and athletic director at Austin College until 1934. He then became Jimmy Kitts' top assistant at Rice for six years before becoming Rice's backfield coach under Jess Neely from 1940 to 1966. From 1934 through 1961, Grigg became the only man to coach the six Rice teams that won or tied for the Southwest Conference titles (1934, 1937, 1946, 1949, 1953, 1957). When he retired he was the only one to coach every one of the seven Owls teams that participated in major bowl games. Grigg was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1962.
Name:  
Grubbs, Howard
City:  
Kaufman
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Leadership characterized the life and career of Howard Grubbs, who was associated with athletics for more than 50 years. At Kaufman High School, he lettered in four sports, and at Texas Christian University he was All-Southwest Conference quarterback and captain of its first championship football team in 1929. He was named the Outstanding Player in the 1930 Dixie Classic All-Star game in Dallas after throwing two touchdown passes. He served as head football coach at Lufkin High School for three years and returned to TCU as Freshman Coach in 1934. In 1935, he became TCU's athletic director and doubled as an assistant football coach until he was appointed executive secretary of the Southwest Conference in 1950. He remained the executive secretary for 23 years while also serving as secretary-treasurer of the Cotton Bowl Athletic Association. Grubbs was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1967.
Name:  
Guldahl, Ralph
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Consistency and concentration were the trademarks of golfer Ralph Guldahl. At the age of 18, he beat David "Spec" Goldman to win the Dallas City Amateur title and five months later he won the Motion Picture Industry Tournament at Los Angeles. He reached golf's pinnacle by winning two U.S. Open championships. In 1937 he shot a 281 to defeat Sam Snead at Oakland Hills Country Club in Birmingham, Michigan. Guldahl successfully defended his title in 1938 at Cherry Hills Country Club in Denver, Colorado. Guldahl was also a member of the 1937 United States Ryder Cup Team-the first to win on British soil. He collected the Western Open trophy three consecutive years (1936-1938). After finishing as the runner-up in 1937 and 1938, he won the Masters in 1939. Guldahl was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1968.
Name:  
Gustafson, Cliff
City:  
San Antonio
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Cliff Gustafson returned to his alma mater, the University of Texas, in 1968 as head baseball coach. In doing so, he followed in the footsteps of legendary Hall of Famers Uncle Billy Disch and Bibb Falk. Not only that, he had taken a pay cut in leaving South San Antonio High School where in 13 years his teams had won seven state championships. The Longhorns were to be ever indebted to "Coach Gus." In 1994 he posted victory No. 1,333 to become the winningest baseball coach in NCAA history. His UT teams over won 80.5 percent of their games over 27 seasons with 21 SWC titles, 17 College World Series appearances, and two national championships. Scores of former players including Burt Hooton, Keith Moreland, Roger Clemens, Spike Owen, and Greg Swindell graduated from Gustafson's program to the Major Leagues. Gustafson was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1994.
Name:  
Hale, I.B.
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
I.B. Hale, a two-time All-America tackle, was ranked among the very best of many great players during Texas Christian University's most triumphant football era. In 1937, Hale was on the TCU team that defeated Marquette in the first Cotton Bowl classic. As a senior, he played on the undefeated and untied 1938 national championship team that finished with a 15-7 victory over Carnegie Tech in the 1939 Sugar Bowl. Teammates included Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Davey O'Brien and center Ki Aldrich, both members of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame, as well as their TCU coach, Dutch Meyer. Hale was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1985.
Name:  
Hall, Jim
City:  
Midland
School:  
Sport:  
Auto Racing
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Abilene, Texas native Jim Hall has had success as a racecar driver, designer and owner. Hall's Chaparral cars were legendary for their aerodynamic design and success on the track. Hall, the 1964 U.S. Road Racing Champion, teamed with Chaparral partner Hap Sharp to win the twelve hour Sebring race in 1965. Hall's design innovations included fiberglass chassis, cast aluminum alloy wheels, moveable spoilers and auxiliary generated vacuum ground effects. As an owner, Hall has two Indy 500 wins to his credit: 1978 with Al Unser driving and in 1980 with Johnny Rutherford behind the wheel. Hall was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.
Name:  
Hall, Kenneth
City:  
Sugar Land
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Kenneth Hall "The Sugar Land Express" is the all-time leading rusher in Texas high school football history with 11,232 yards. In four seasons (1950-1953), at Sugar Land High School Hall set numerous national offensive records, some of which have not been broken over 60 years since his last carry. At 6’2”, 205 lbs. Hall was an imposing runner who had sprinter’s speed - he was clocked at 9.7 in the 100 yard dash. In 1953 Hall was the first prep player to rush for over 11,000 yards and the first to rush for more than 4,000 yards in a season. That year he led the Gators to a 12-0 record and a class B regional championship. At Texas A&M Hall was not a good fit for Coach Bear Bryant’s system and left after his freshman year. He played professionally in the Canadian Football League and with the Houston Oilers but his career was shortened by injuries. In 1983 he was inducted into the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame and the National High School Hall of Fame. In 2000 the first Ken Hall Trophy was presented to the National High School Football Player of the Year by the U.S. Army All-American Bowl. The stadium at Fort Bend ISD was named in his honor in 2004. Hall was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1994. KEN HALL’S NATIONAL RECORDS • Career rushing yards (1950-53) – 11,232 ranks 2nd behind Derrick Henry (2012) • Career total yards – 14,558 – ranks 5th • Rushing yards in a single season (1953, 12 games) – 4,045 – ranks 6th • Rushing yards averaged per game (1953) 337.1 – ranks 3rd • Rushing yards averaged per attempt in a game – 47.3 – ranks 1st o 1953 vs. Houston Lutheran 520 yards on 11 carries • Points scored in a career – 899 – ranks 8th • Points scored in a season (1953) – 395 – ranks 8th • Points averaged per game in a season (1953) – 32.9 – ranks 1st
Name:  
Hamm, Mia
City:  
Selma, AL
School:  
Sport:  
Soccer
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Mia Hamm, the greatest female soccer player in history, spent her formative years in Wichita Falls playing youth soccer while attending Notre Dame Catholic School. At age 15 she became the youngest player to ever play for the U.S. National Team. Hamm had a brilliant college career at North Carolina where she led the school to four consecutive NCAA titles. A forward and midfielder for the U.S. Women's National Team, Hamm led United States to FIFA World Cup titles in 1991 & 1999. She was also named the FIFA World Player of the Year in 2001 & 2002. Hamm also represented her county in the Olympic Games leading the U.S. to Gold medals in 1996 & 2004. Her other honors include being named MVP of 1995 World Cup and the Soccer USA Female Athlete of the Year from 1994-1998. Hamm's 158 international goals are the most ever scored by a man or woman in soccer history. In 1997, she created the Mia Hamm Foundation for bone marrow research to honor her late brother, Garrett. She was also inducted into the U.S. Soccer Hall of Fame in 2007. Hamm is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2007.
Name:  
Hansen, Fred
City:  
Cuero
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Few athletes have been as dedicated in the pursuit of excellence as Fred Hansen. As a Rice senior competing for the last time, and with an opportunity to set a Southwest Conference pole vault record that would have stood for years, Fred sacrificed himself. He volunteered for broad jump and javelin duty to help Rice win the conference. He picked up points in both events but he hurt a muscle in his back throwing the javelin. That affected his vaulting and kept him from winning first place. Track and field followers remember the former Rice athlete for his gold medal at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics when he pole-vaulted 16 feet 8 3/4 inches and later for his world record, when he became the second man in history to vault higher than 17 feet. Amazingly, he surpassed that mark three times in four weeks, and in a dual meet with the Russians, he vaulted 17 feet 4 inches. Hansen was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1967 at the age of 26, becoming one of its youngest inductees.
Name:  
Harris, Cliff
City:  
School:  
Ouachita Baptist University
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2015
Cliff Harris, an undrafted free agent out of Ouachita Baptist, signed with the Dallas Cowboys in 1970 and soon became an intimidating presence for a Cowboys defense that never fell out of the Top 10 in his decade at free safety (1970-1979). Harris was a part one of the best defensive backfields ever in the NFL. The hard-hitting "Captain Crash" was a six-time Pro Bowler (1974-1979) and a four-time 1st team All-Pro selection from 1975-1978. Harris is one of the few players in NFL history who have played in five Super Bowls. He helped Cowboys win world titles in 1971 and 1977. Harris had 29 interceptions (including six during the playoffs) and 16 fumble recoveries during his career. He was chosen by the Hall of Fame Selection Committee to the NFL's 1970s All-Decade Team, the Dallas Cowboys Silver Season All-Time Team and the prestigious Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor in 2004. Harris has also been inducted into the NAIA Hall of Fame and the Arkansas Sports HOF. In 2013, the inaugural Cliff Harris Award was presented to the Small College Defensive Player of the Year. He is the author of two very successful books - Tales from the Dallas Cowboys written with Charlie Waters and Captain Crash and the Dallas Cowboys: From Sideline to Goal Line with Cliff Harris.  Harris is active in civic affairs, having served on numerous boards including the National Paralysis Foundation, NFL Alumni, FCA, CASA, the Dallas Rehabilitation Institute, American Diabetes Association and today he serves on the Board of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). For over twenty years Cliff's celebrity golf tournaments have been supporting Dallas area charities. This year's Cliff Harris Reunion Classic benefitting the JDRF will be held in June. Harris is currently a principal with Energy Transfer Technologies in Dallas.
Name:  
Hart, Clyde
City:  
Hot Springs, AR
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Clyde Hart has been the track coach at Baylor since 1963. He is recognized as the finest long sprint coach in the world and coached Olympic champion Michael Johnson. Hart has coached 10 world record performances (9 relay, 1 individual), 429 NCAA All-Americans (143 individual and 286 relay) and 39 NCAA national champions. His teams have won 2 SWC indoor titles and have 16 top 10 finishes at NCAA Championships. Hart has been named Indoor Track Coach of the Year six times, four by the SWC and twice by the NCAA. He was also named USOC National Track & Field Coach of the Year in 1996 and was selected to the USA Olympic Coaching Staff for the 2000 Olympics. Hart was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2000.
Name:  
Haskins, Don
City:  
El Paso
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Texas Western;s Don Haskins became the first and only basketball coach in Texas to win the NCAA Division I national championship when his team defeated Adolf Rupp's Kentucky Wildcats 72-65 in 1966. Haskins' championship team was also the first to start five black players. He coached the Miners for 38 seasons from 1961-1999, compiling a record of 719 wins, 353 losses, and a Western Athletic Conference record five consecutive titles. The "Bear" began his career as a high school coach in the Texas Panhandle compiling a six-year record of 160-41. Haskins was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1987.
Name:  
Hayes, Bob
City:  
Jacksonville, Florida
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
"Bullet" Bob Hayes played wide receiver for the Dallas Cowboys from 1965-1974. Hayes earned the title "World's Fastest Man" after winning gold medals in 1964 Olympics in the 100m and running a sensational 8.6 split on U.S.'s 400 meter relay team. The former Florida A&M star was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys as a junior in the seventh round of the 1964 draft. Hayes' speed forced teams to change from primarily man to man defense and start using zones. He was a four-time All Pro selection and played in three Pro Bowls. Hayes caught 371 passes for 7,414 yards, averaged 20 yards per catch and scored 71 touchdowns. He was a member of Cowboys' 1971 NFL Champion team making him the only athlete in history to win an Olympic gold medal and a Super Bowl ring. Hayes was selected as a member of the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor in 2001, the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2009 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2003.
Name:  
Hayes, E.O.
City:  
Denton
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Success characterized the career of E.O. "Doc" Hayes as an athlete and as a coach. At North Texas Teachers College, he was a star performer on the basketball team. In 1927, he began coaching and teaching at the Pilot Point High School and later started on a remarkable 41-year career as a basketball coach. He developed a state championship team for Dallas Crozier Tech in 1946 and qualified six other teams for the state playoffs in a 17-season span. During the 20 years he coached at Southern Methodist University (1947-1967), he earned more Southwest Conference championship glory--five undisputed championships and three co-championships--than any other coach in the first 75 years of Southwest Conference history. Hayes was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1972.
Name:  
Hayes, Elvin
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Elvin Hayes was three-time All-American at the University of Houston (1965-68) and led the Cougars to a record of 81-12 and two Final Four appearances. In 93 varsity games, he averaged 31.0 points and 17.2 rebounds in 1968, his senior year; he was voted College Player of the Year with a 36.8 scoring mark. In 1968 he scored 39 points against Lew Alcindor and UCLA snapping the Bruins' 47 game winning streak. The game was played before a record 52,693 fans at the Astrodome. Hayes later played seven seasons with the Rockets and nine with the Bullets. During his pro career, he played in more games (1,303) and more minutes (50,000) than any player in NBA history. He ranks third all-time in scoring (27,513) and third in rebounds (16,279). He was All-NBA three times (1975, 1977, 1979), appeared in 12 consecutive All-Star games and was named to the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History. Hayes was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.
Name:  
Haynes, Abner
City:  
Denton
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Abner Haynes is one of the few athletes who was able to play his high school, college and professional football in North Texas. Haynes broke the color barrier at North Texas State (now the University of North Texas) in 1956 for Coach Odus Mitchell. As a starting running back in 1958 & 1959, he led North Texas to a 16-4-1 record while rushing for 1,864 career yards & 25 TDs. In 1960, Haynes earned Rookie of the Year honors with the AFL's Dallas Texans. That season he led league in rushing with 875 yards and averaged 15.4 yards in punt returns. Haynes would go on to set AFL records for TDs in a game (5), TDs in a season (19) and career TDs (46). In his eight professional seasons with the Dallas Texans (1960-1963), Kansas City Chiefs (1963-1964), Denver Broncos (1965-1966), Miami Dolphins (1967) & New York Jets (1967) he had 4,630 career rushing yards & 12,065 combined total yards. He is also a member of the North Texas Athletic Hall of Fame (1986) and the Kansas City Chiefs Hall of Fame (1991). Haynes has spent the last 15 years promoting Heroes of Football to benefit former pro football players who suffer from disabilities. Haynes is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2007.
Name:  
Haynie, Sandra
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
This golfing prodigy from Fort Worth was destined to join the legendary ranks of women golfers from her native State -- Zaharias, Jameson, Rawls, Whitworth. In 1977 Sandra Haynie was the ninth golfer and fifth Texan admitted to the LPGA Hall of Fame. Her ascent to the top began as a teenager. At 16 she had already won the Texas State Amateur (twice), the Texas Publinks (twice) and the Trans-Mississippi. Three years later she won the Austin Civitan Open -- the first of 42 titles on the pro circuit. Her first "major" came at the age of 22 when she captured the 1965 LPGA Championship. Haynie pulled off a rare double in 1974, winning both the U.S. Open and LPGA Championship. Her fourth major title in 1982 came in what became known as the Du Maurier Classic. Haynie's career earnings exceeded $1 million despite missing most of four prime years on the tour due to injuries. Haynie was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.
Name:  
Heidenreich, Jerry
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Swimming
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Jerry Heidenreich became a standout swimmer at Hillcrest High School in Dallas, where he won the state championship twice. His stardom continued at Southern Methodist University under famed coach Red Barr, where he became an All-American and set 17 school records. Heidenreich won the NCAA championship in the 200-yard freestyle, setting an American record. At the 1972 Olympics in Munich, Germany, he won four medals - two gold, a silver and a bronze. Heidenreich won the gold in the 4x100 Medley and the 4x100 Freestyle relays. He won a silver in the 100 meter individual Freestyle and a bronze in the 100 meter individual Butterfly. The relay teams broke the world record in the 4x100 Medley and the 4x100 Freestyle. Heidenreich was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1987.
Name:  
Henderson, Bill
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Football, Basketball, Track, Swimming, Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
By the time that 6'5 210 pound Bill "Jitterbug" Henderson graduated from Texas A&M, he had earned more letters than any other athlete in Southwest Conference history. In his varsity career from 1940-42, Henderson won three letters in football, basketball and track, and one in swimming and baseball. He was the first Aggie to pin four letters in one scholastic year (1940-41), when he participated in football, basketball, baseball, and track and field. He was also an All-Southwest Conference football player in 1942. Henderson was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1974.
Name:  
Henderson, R.E.
City:  
Ballinger
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Rarely is there a coach who has a losing record over 18 seasons, yet gains the highest respect of his peers, including enshrinement in the Texas Sports Hall of Fame. R.E. Henderson of Baylor was the first Southwest Conference coach to take his basketball team to the NCAA finals. Although his team accomplished three stunning upsets in the 1948 playoffs, they lost to Adolph Rupp's Kentucky team in the championship game. Henderson's most successful years as a coach were from 1946 to 1950 when the Bears won two Southwest Conference titles and tied for two more. Afterward, his best teams finished third in 1953, 1954 and 1957. Henderson was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1976.
Name:  
Herskowitz, Mickey
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Media
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
"The Mick" is one of the most prolific writers of this age, as he is the author of more than 40 books. He has written best-selling biographies of Dan Rather, Mickey Mantle, Howard Cosell, Gene Autry, Nolan Ryan, Bette Davis, Gene Tierney and the late Sen. Prescott Bush, the father and grandfather of two U.S. presidents. Mickey's work appears in many anthologies, including a collection of 50 writers that includes James Michener, John Updike and Norman Mailer. He has received the National Headliners Award for excellence in sports writing. At 26, Mickey was the youngest sports editor of a major newspaper in the country. A former Marine and a Distinguished Alumnus of the University of Houston, he was inducted into the City of Houston's Hall of Fame in 1984. His career has ranged across the sports world. He is a former executive with the American Football League, a New York Magazine editor, an original partner with the Houston Rockets, and one of the owners of the 1986 Breeders Cup Classic champion, Skywalker. Herskowitz was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2005.
Name:  
Higgins, Michael
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Michael "Pinky" Higgins, a native of Red Oak and a graduate of Dallas' Adamson High School, had a 14-year professional baseball career. As a player with three American League teams (Philadelphia, Boston, and Detroit) he had a .292 lifetime average, appeared in two World Series, two All-Star games and led all third basemen in double plays in 1934. In 1938 he set a record of 12 consecutive hits in as many trips to the plate. In the 1940 World Series with Detroit he drove in six runs on eight hits, including a home run that won the third game, and he set four fielding records. He managed the Boston Red Sox from 1955-1962. Higgins was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1965.
Name:  
Hines, Jim
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The world's fastest sprinter in the 1960's was James Raymond Hines of Texas Southern University. In a span of five months, he participated in three world records and won two Olympic Gold Medals. Hines was the first runner to break the 10-second barrier in the 100 meters. His world record 9.99 won at the AAU Nationals on June 20, 1968, in Sacramento. On October 14 in Mexico City, he clocked an electrifying 9.95 to win the Olympics. Hines' second Gold came in the 4x100 meter relay as the USA set a world record 38.2 seconds. Both world marks stood the test of time: Hines' 100 for 20 years, the relay for 16. As a junior under Coach Stan Wright at TSU in 1967, he tied Jesse Owens' world record of 9.1 in the 100-yard dash. Hines was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1994.
Name:  
Hirsch, Max Sr.
City:  
Fredricksburg
School:  
Sport:  
Horse Racing
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
After a brief career of riding thoroughbreds, Max Hirsch switched to training horses and became one of the best in the business. His career spanned 60 years, during which time he trained three Kentucky Derby winners: Bold Venture in 1949, Assault in 1946, and Middleground in 1950. Assault's 1946 Triple Crown was the first ever by a Texas bred horse. Assault, the "Club-Footed Comet" hailed from the King Ranch in South Texas. Hirsch was proud of his Kentucky Derby winners, but claimed that his most exciting moment in horse racing occurred when Hirsch-trained Sarazen beat the French star Epinard at the 1924 International Special at Latonia. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1970.
Name:  
Hogan, Ben
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Ben Hogan, a native of Dublin, Texas who grew up in Fort Worth was voted the greatest professional golfer of the first half of the 20th Century. His 68 career tournament wins included nine major tournament titles: the U.S. Open (1948, 1950, 1951, 1953), Masters (1951, 1953), PGA Championship (1946, 1948) and the British Open in 1953, the only time he competed in it. His winning of golf's triple-crown in 1953 after recovering from a near fatal car accident ranks among the most sensational feats in sports history. As a result he was named the 1953 Professional Male Athlete of the Year. Hogan was a member of the U.S. Ryder Cup team in 1947 and 1951 and captained the team in 1953. Throughout his career, he won the Vardon Trophy three times, was leading money-winner five years, and was honored four times as player of the year. Hogan was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1970.
Name:  
Holub, E.J.
City:  
Lubbock
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
E.J. Holub was a two-time (1959, 1960) All-America center at Texas Tech who often doubled on defense as a linebacker. Holub was a captain of all-star squads in the East-West Shrine game and the Senior bowl. He was named outstanding lineman in the Shrine game and also made its all-time honor squad. He played pro football with the Dallas Texans (1961-62) and Kansas City Chiefs (1963-70) at linebacker, but because of knee injuries he later moved to center. He was All-Pro in the American Football League and started in Super Bowls I and IV, once as a linebacker and once as a center. He is a member of the Texas Tech Hall of Fame and the Kansas City Chiefs Hall of Fame. Holub was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1982.
Name:  
Hooper, Darrow
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Darrow Hooper was a champion at the age of 11 when he won a Fort Worth city title in the shot-put. Throughout his high school and college careers, Hooper was an outstanding and versatile athlete. At Fort Worth's North Side High School he lettered in football, basketball, and track and field. He set national high school records in the shot-put and the discus and was the city's top scorer in football as a T-formation quarterback. During his years at Texas A&M (1949-53), he developed into a world-class athlete, but was recognized most for his outstanding achievements in track and field. He won the shot-put and discus at the Texas, Drake, and Kansas Relays, starred on Southwest Conference championship teams, and won the shot-put silver medal in the 1952 Olympic games. Hooper was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1979.
Name:  
Hooton, Burt
City:  
Greenville
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
One of the most dominant pitchers in Southwest Conference history, Burt Hooton ruled the mound for the University of Texas from 1969-1971. He had a 35-3 collegiate record which included two no-hitters, a paltry 1.14 career ERA and 386 strikeouts. The 6'1, 210 lb. Hooton led Texas to three SWC titles & two trips to the College World Series. He was the 2nd overall pick of the 1971 MLB draft by the Chicago Cubs. In his first season of pro ball he struck out 19 in a Triple A game. On April 16, 1972, in only his fourth major league start, Hooton threw a no-hitter for the Chicago Cubs. He had a 151-136 career major league record with a 3.38 ERA, 1,491 strikeouts with Chicago Cubs (1971-75), Los Angeles Dodgers (1975-84) and Texas Rangers (1985). In 1981 Hooton was selected to play in the All-Star Game then went 4-1 in the postseason with a 0.82 ERA to lead the Dodgers to victory in the World Series. In the decisive game six of the series Hooton out-dueled Tommy John and the New York Yankees 9-2. Hooton was inducted into the National College Baseball Hall of Fame in 2008 and had his number retired by the University of Texas in 2009. He is currently the pitching coach for the Round Rock Express. Hooton is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2009.
Name:  
Hornsby, Rogers
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Texas-born and Fort Worth-raised, Rogers "Rajah" Hornsby signed his first contract in 1914 with Denison in the Class D Texas-Oklahoma League. He began his major-league career in 1915 as a second baseman with the St. Louis Cardinals and later managed the team to the 1926 pennant and defeated the New York Yankees in the World Series. He also played for the New York Giants, Boston Braves, Chicago Cubs, and the St. Louis Browns. During his career, he earned the National League Most Valuable Player Award twice, won seven batting championships, set the all-time record for highest single season batting average (.424) and finished a 22-year major league career with a lifetime batting average of .358, the highest in National League history. Hornsby was inducted into he Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1955.
Name:  
Houston, Ken
City:  
Lufkin
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Ken Houston of Lufkin and Prairie View A&M is widely recognized as the premier strong safety of his era, if not all time. His brilliant 14-year career with the Houston Oilers, 1967-72, and Washington Redskins, 1973-1980, was memorialized by induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1986, his first year of eligibility. Houston would have shared the Pro Bowl record for appearances with 10 had not an injury sidelined him in the 1980 game. Earlier in his career, he had played in two AFL all-star games. With the Redskins he was named All-NFC or All-Pro in seven straight seasons, 1973-1979. The 6'3'', 198lb Houston became famous as a punishing tackler from his secondary position. He also intercepted 49 passes and averaged 18.3 per return. Houston was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1994.
Name:  
Howley, Chuck
City:  
Wheeling, WV
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
If not for a career threatening knee injury Chuck Howley might never have played for the Dallas Cowboys. Howley, the 1957 Southern Conference Player of the Year at West Virginia, was drafted by the Chicago Bears in 1958. The next season, his promising career with the Bears ended with a knee injury. Howley soon received a phone call from team scout Gil Brandt in 1961 and "unretired" to join the Dallas Cowboys. Howley stalked Dallas' opponents from 1961 to 1973 and along with Lee Roy Jordan formed one of the NFL's most feared line-backing tandems. He made All-Pro six times and was selected to six Pro Bowls. Although the Cowboys lost Super Bowl V to the Baltimore Colts 16-13, Howley became the only player in history to be named MVP of the Super Bowl from a losing team. In that game Howley intercepted two Dolphin passes and recovered a fumble. In fact, during his career (1961-1973) Howley would recover 17 fumbles (2nd all-time in team history) and intercept 24 passes. He was inducted into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor on October 30, 1977. Coach Tom Landry once said of him, "I don't know that I've seen anybody better at linebacker than Howley." Howley is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2009.
Name:  
Hughes, Robert
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Fort Worth Dunbar coaching legend Robert Hughes retired as the winningest high school basketball coach in the nation. On February 11, 2003 Hughes passed Morgan Wootten of Dematha Catholic High School in Hyattsville, Maryland when he earned his 1,275th victory. Hughes, retired in 2005 after coaching his 47th season and had a 1,333-264 career record. He began his career at Fort Worth's I.M. Terrell High School (1958-1973) where his teams had a 373-84 record and won three Prairie View Interscholastic League state championships (1963, 1965 & 1967). He took over the job as coach of the Fort Worth Dunbar Flying Wildcats in 1973-74, winning state championships in 1993 & 2003 and finishing as runner-up three other times. Hughes' teams mad 30 consecutive playoff appearances and had only one losing season. In 2002 the basketball court of the Wilkerson-Greines Activity Center in Fort Worth was renamed Robert Hughes Court. In 2003 Hughes was inducted into the National High School Hall of Fame as well as the Texas Sports Hall of Fame.
Name:  
Hughson, Cecil
City:  
Kyle
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Buda, Texas native Cecil "Tex" Hughson pitched for the Boston Red Sox from 1941-49 and compiled a 96-54 record. Hughson's finest season was 1942 when he led the league in wins (22), complete games (22), innings pitched (281) and strikeouts (113). In 1946 Hughson helped lead the Red Sox to the American League pennant by winning 20 games. The 6'3, 198 lb. hurler was an All-SWC pitcher in 1937 for the Texas Longhorns. Hughson was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1987.
Name:  
Humble, Weldon
City:  
San Antonio
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
In a career that began at Rice University in 1940 and successfully continued in the pro ranks, Weldon Humble earned a reputation as one of the finest interior linemen in Texas football history. In 1942, he earned All-Southwest Conference honors, but his college years were interrupted when he served in the Marines during World War II. When he returned to Rice in 1946, he lettered in football and track and field, became a consensus first-team All-American guard while a captain of the Southwest Conference co-champion team, and led the Owls to victory over Tennessee in the 1947 Orange Bowl game. He later joined the Cleveland Browns and played in the first pro All-Star game in 1950 and was twice named All-Pro. Following retirement, he was voted into the College Football Hall of Fame (1961), Texas Sports Hall of Fame (1969), South Texas Football Hall of Fame (1969), and the Rice University Athletic Hall of Fame (1970). Humble was also named to the 50th Anniversary All-Time Southwest Conference team for the years of 1919-1968.
Name:  
Hunt, Joel
City:  
Waco
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
In three seasons as Texas A&M's quarterback, Joel Hunt guided the Aggies to 20 wins against only four losses and three ties. He also led A&M to two Southwest Conference titles. He scored 33 points as a sophomore, 63 as a junior, and 128 as a senior. His 128 points in 1927 became a long-standing Southwest Conference record, and his A&M record 30 touchdowns and 224 points stood for nearly 50 years. One of his greatest games was in 1927 when A&M played undefeated Southern Methodist University. Hunt scored three touchdowns, punted for a 40-yard average, and intercepted four passes in leading the Aggies to a 39-13 victory. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1958.
Name:  
Hunt, Lamar
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Football, Tennis
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
As a pro sports entrepreneur, Lamar Hunt changed forever the structure of pro football. He founded the American Football League in 1960, and his Dallas Texans were among the league's eight franchises. After winning the AFL title in 1962, the Texans moved and became the Kansas City Chiefs. In 1966, Hunt was one of the principal architects of the AFL-NFL merger. He also gave the Super Bowl its name and, coincidentally, his Chiefs played in the first one on Jan. 15, 1967. Hunt has served as a president of the AFC since its inception in 1970, and its championship trophy was named in his honor. In 1967 Hunt, along with Dave Dixon and Al G. Hill Jr., formed the World Championship Tennis tour (WCT). That same year Hunt also invested in the Dallas Tornado Soccer Club in the NASL. He was an original investor in Major League Soccer and part owner of the Kansas City Wizards. Hunt is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame (1972), International Tennis Hall of Fame (1993), and the National Soccer Hall of Fame (1982). He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1984.
Name:  
Irvin, Michael
City:  
Fort Lauderdale, FL
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Michael Irvin was selected by the Dallas Cowboys with the 11th overall pick in the 1988 NFL Draft. He quickly established himself as one of the greatest offensive players in team history. "The Playmaker" was a team leader who led the Cowboys to six division titles, four consecutive NFC championship games and three Super Bowl victories. Irvin had 750 career receptions (currently tied for 18th all-time in NFL history and 10th at the time of his retirement), 11,904 career yards (currently ranks 14th all-time and was ninth all-time at retirement) and 65 career touchdowns. During a career that lasted from 1988-1999, Irvin set Dallas Cowboy career records for receptions, receiving yards, playoff receptions and playoff yards. He was voted to five consecutive Pro Bowls (1991-1995), two more than any other WR in club history and in 2005 joined the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor. In 2007, he joined football's elite fraternity as a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Irvin is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2007. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE DALLAS COWBOYS
Name:  
Isbell, Larry
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Football, Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Houston native Larry Isbell quarterbacked the Baylor Bears from 1949-1951. A consensus All-SWC player in 1950 and 1951, he threw for 2,716 yards and 26 TDs during his college career. In 1951 Isbell made the All-America team and led the Bears to an 8-2-1 record and a trip to the Orange Bowl. Isbell was a master at the play-action fake and was also an excellent punter. He was a first-round draft pick of the Washington Redskins in 1952 but elected to play minor league baseball. Isbell went on to play five seasons in the Canadian Football League with the Saskatchewan Roughriders. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2000.
Name:  
Jackson, Oliver
City:  
Denison
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Oliver Jackson was one of America's most successful track and field coaches during his 16 years at Abilene Christian University. He coached ACU teams from 1948 through 1963, during which time he developed 16 world record-holders and three Olympians: Bobby Morrow, Earl Young and Billy Pemelton. Jacksons athletes won NAIA titles in 1952, 1954 and 1955. Jackson was known for his excellent relay teams which won a total of 78 titles at major relay meets. In 1953, his sprint relay teams scored a rare triple crown by winning the 440, 880, and mile relay events at Texas, Kansas and Drake Relays. Jackson was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1978.
Name:  
Jameson, Betty
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Betty Jameson was a golf child prodigy. By the age of 13, she had won her first tournament trophy on Tenison golf course in Dallas, and her success continued throughout the rest of her career. At the age of 15, she competed in the Southern Women's Amateur Championship and won. Before she was 19, Jameson won four Texas Women's Amateur crowns. As a teenager, she won the Women's Trans-Miss, the Women's Western and the Women's United States Amateur in the same year. After turning pro, Jameson became the first woman to crack 300 for a 72-hole event by winning the 1947 U.S. Open Championship with a score of 295. She also was one of 11 female pros who organized the Ladies Professional Golf Association. Jameson was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1968.
Name:  
January, Don
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Don January won golf championships in five decades. In the 1940s he won two Dallas City Junior Championships and led Sunset High School to a state title. In the 1950s, he helped North Texas State win three consecutive NCAA championships from 1950-1952. In the 1960s, he made a hole-in-one worth $50,000 and won six more tour events, including the 1967 PGA Championship. In the 1970s, he won three more tour championships and became the oldest player in history, at the age of 46, to win the Vardon Trophy for the tour's year low-stroke average. A member of the 1965 and 1977 Ryder Cup teams, he became the 20th player in history to surpass $1 million in official winnings. January has 22 Senior PGA Tour victories including the inaugural senior tournament in 1980, the Atlantic City Seniors International. January was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1979.
Name:  
Jenkins, Dan
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Media
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dan Jenkins is one of America's most-renowned sportswriters as well as a best-selling author/novelist. He still keeps his hand in sports writing by penning a monthly column for Golf Digest and covers major golf championships. A graduate of TCU, Dan was top player on the Frogs' golf team for three years. After graduation, he joined The Press and then the Dallas Times Herald before joining Sports Illustrated in 1984. He wrote more than 500 stories for SI in his 22 years with the magazine. He is the author of 16 books, seven of which have been best-selling novels, including Baja Oklahoma, Semi Tough, Dead Solid Perfect and You Gotta Play Hurt. Dan is a multiple winner of the Best Story of the Year Award and a recipient of the Lincoln A. Werden Award for Outstanding Contributions to Golf Journalism from the Golf Writers Association of America. He has won the Overseas Press Club Award for Best Magazine Reporting from Abroad, the Jack Nicklaus Golf Journalism Award, and the PGA Lifetime Achievement Award for Journalism. He is also a member of the World Sportswriters Hall of Fame. Jenkins was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2005.
Name:  
Jenkins, Lew
City:  
Sweetwater
School:  
Sport:  
Boxing
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Lew Jenkins, known to fans as the "Sweetwater Swatter", won the lightweight boxing title on May 11, 1940. Jenkins defeated Lou Ambers in three rounds and was the first person to ever knock out the defending champ. Jenkins then began 19 free-wheeling, party-filled months as the world light-weight champion. He avoided training but still managed a draw with welterweight champ Fritzie Zivic, and had another knockout over Ambers before losing the crown to Sammy Angott. Jenkins fought 109 times winning 47 by knockout, 19 by decision, had 5 draws and lost 38 times. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1973.
Name:  
Johnson, Dr. Charley
City:  
Big Spring
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Charley Johnson a native of Big Spring, Texas was one of the most successful quarterbacks of his generation. Before attending New Mexico State where he was a 6'0, 200 pound dual-sport athlete at from 1958 to 1961 in basketball and football, he attended Schreiner Institute from 1956-1958. While at New Mexico State he led the football team to a 23-9 record during his career at quarterback. Johnson is the only back to back Sun Bowl MVP, 1959 and 1960 and is the only player in New Mexico State school history to have a jersey, No. 33 retired. He played 15 years in the NFL with the St. Louis Cardinals (1961-1969), Houston Oilers (1970-1971), and Denver Broncos (1972-1975). Johnson was selected to the 1963 Pro Bowl team. He finished his career with 165 games, 1,737 completions, 170 TDs & 24,410 yards passing and he won 60 percent of the games he started. Johnson was named a member of Denver Broncos Ring of Fame in 1986. He earned his doctorate in chemical engineering while playing professional football and is currently a chemical engineer professor at New Mexico State University. Johnson was inducted into the hall of fame as part of the class of 2010.
Name:  
Johnson, Jack
City:  
Galveston
School:  
Sport:  
Boxing
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Jack Johnson, a Galveston native, was an extraordinary athlete whose boxing career led to 105 victories and only seven losses over more than two decades. Johnson began boxing in 1897 after arriving in Boston and meeting Joe Walcott. Johnson picked up a lot of boxing techniques while helping Walcott train. In 1908, Johnson challenged heavyweight champion Tommy Burns and won the title with a 14th-round knock-out. On July 4, 1910, Johnson successfully defended his heavyweight championship by knocking out Jim Jeffries in the 15th round. This fight, which was held before 20,000 spectators at an open-air ring in Reno, Nev., was acclaimed as the "Fight of the Century". Johnson held the crown for nine years before losing a 26 round battle to Jess Willard at Havana, Cuba in 1915. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1971.
Name:  
Johnson, Jimmy
City:  
Port Arthur
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Port Arthur native Jimmy Johnson was an all-state lineman at Port Arthur's Jefferson High School. He went on to become an All-SWC guard on Arkansas' 1964 National Championship team. His first head coaching job was at Oklahoma State (1979-1983) where he was named Big 8 Coach of the Year in 1979. In 1984 Johnson took the University of Miami job and from 1984-88 posted a 52-9 record taking the Hurricanes to five bowl games. His 1987 team won the National Championship with a 20-14 victory over the Oklahoma Sooners in the Orange Bowl. As head coach of the Dallas Cowboys from 1989-1993 Johnson led the Cowboys to back to back NFL Championships in 1992 and 1993 with victories in Super Bowls XVII and XVIII. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2000.
Name:  
Johnson, John Drew
City:  
Waco
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
In 1968 Harold Ratliff, the longtime Associated Press regional sports editor known as �Mr. Schoolboy Football� selected John Drew "Boody" Johnson as "the greatest high school football player in Texas history". Johnson, who was able to drop-kick 50 yard field goals, was described by Waco sportswriter "Jinx" Tucker as having "a marvelous side-step, and a zig-zag that is nothing short of bewildering". The Tigers were undefeated in 1921 but did not win the state title because they were not members of the UIL. In the 1922 state championship game, a 13-10 win over Abilene, Johnson had a spectacular day, he scored all of Waco's points on a touchdown, extra point, and two drop-kick field goals, in the last four minutes of the game. During Johnson's three years at Waco, the Tigers posted 30 victories, one loss, and one tie. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1973.
Name:  
Johnson, Larry
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2014
Dallas’ Larry Johnson was a 1987 McDonalds High School All-American at Dallas Skyline for coach J.D. Mayo. At Odessa College he became the first two-time NJCAA Player of the Year winning the award in 1988 & 1989. The 6’7” Johnson was a two-time All-American at UNLV in 1990 and 1991. In the 1990 NCAA title game vs. Duke he had 22 pts & 11 rebounds in 103-73 win which was the largest margin of victory ever in a title game. His senior year playing for Coach Jerry Tarkanian, the Running Rebels posted a perfect 27-0 regular season record but were upset by Duke in the Final Four. Johnson was the 1990-91 John R. Wooden Award winner and was also named the Naismith College Player of the Year. He was the 1st overall pick in the 1991 NBA Draft by Charlotte Hornets (1991-1996). “LJ” played for the New York Knicks from 1996-2001 helping them win the 1999 Eastern Conference title. Johnson was named the 1992 NBA Rookie of the Year and was selected to NBA All-Star Teams in 1993 & 1995. His career NBA totals include 11,450 points and 5,300 rebounds for an average of 16.2 PPG & 7.5 RPG. Johnson also represented his country as a member of the 1994 FIBA World Championship team. He currently works for the New York Knicks as a basketball & business operations representative. Johnson was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2014.
Name:  
Johnson, Michael
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dallas native Michael Johnson currently holds the world record in the 200 meters (19.32) and the 400 meters (43.18). On August 26, 1999 he broke won of track and field's longest standing records when he set the new 400m record at the World Championships in Seville, Spain. The old record of 43.29 was set by Butch Reynolds in 1988. Johnson became the first person in history to win gold medals in the 200m and the 400m at the same Olympics. Johnson accomplished the unprecedented double at the 1996 Games in Atlanta. At those same Olympic games, Johnson broke his own world record in the 200m with a time of 19.32. Johnson ran track at Baylor under legendary track coach Clyde Hart from 1987-1990 where he was the NCAA indoor (1989,1990) and outdoor (1990) champion in the 200 meters. Johnson also holds the record for most World Championship gold medals by an athlete-nine. Johnson was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1997.
Name:  
Johnson, Rafer
City:  
Hillsboro
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Hillsboro native Rafer Johnson went to high school in California and became one of the greatest all around athletes in track & field history. In 1954 in his fourth meet, as a freshman at UCLA, he broke the decathlon world record. Johnson also won the decathlon at the 1955 Pan American Games in Mexico City and went on to become a three-time national AAU champion in the event. Although he qualified for two events at the 1956 Olympics, an injury kept him from competing in the long jump and held him to a second place finish in the decathlon. He won the gold medal in the decathlon at the 1960 Olympics defeating UCLA teammate and friend C.K. Yang of Taiwan. Johnson was named the 1960s Associated Press Athlete of the Year and also won the Sullivan Award winner as the nation's top amateur athlete. He is a member of the National Track & Field (1974) and U.S. Olympic Halls of Fame (1983). In 1984 he was chosen to light the Olympic flame at the Opening Ceremonies at the Los Angeles Coliseum. In 2003 UCLA honored Johnson by naming its track and field invitational meet after him. Among his many volunteer efforts he has given his time to the People to People Sports Ambassador Program the Hershey Track and Field Games just to name a few. Johnson was inducted as a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame's Class of 2006.
Name:  
Jones, Jerry
City:  
Little Rock, AK
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Jerry Jones purchased the Dallas Cowboys in 1989 and quickly restored "America's Team" back to national prominence. Jones became the first owner in NFL history to guide his team to three Super Bowl victories in his first seven years of ownership. In 1995, Dallas became the first NFL team to win three Super Bowls (1992, 1993 & 1995) in four seasons. The club also tied the NFL record with five Super Bowl victories. Since Jones took over as Dallas' President and General Manager, the Cowboys have drafted 20 different players who have appeared in 68 Pro Bowls and signed seven free agents who have made 16 Pro Bowls. Jones currently serves on the NFL's Management Council Executive Committee, Broadcast Committee, Business Ventures Committee, Special Committee on League Economics and the Los Angeles Stadium Working Group. In 1992 he became the first owner since Paul Brown to be appointed to the NFL's Competition Committee. Jones' impact on Texas sports history will continue to grow with the 2009 completion of the Cowboy's $1 billion stadium in Arlington, Texas. The new stadium's combination of technology and architectural design will make it the premiere sporting venue in the world. Jones was inducted as a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame's Class of 2006.
Name:  
Jordan, Lee Roy
City:  
Excel, AL
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Lee Roy Jordan played linebacker for the Dallas Cowboys from 1963 to 1976. He was the Cowboys 1st round draft choice in 1963. The former All-American who patrolled the gridiron at Alabama did not disappoint. He was selected to five Pro Bowls and was twice voted All-Pro. Jordan anchored Dallas' famed "Doomsday Defense" retiring as the club's all-time leader in solo tackles with 743. Jordan helped the Cowboys advance to five NFC championship games and three Super Bowls during his superlative career. He was selected to the Cowboys Silver Season All-Time Team in 1984 and was inducted into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor on October 29, 1989. Since his retirement he has successfully operated the Lee Roy Jordan Lumber Company with two of his three sons. Jordan was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2008.
Name:  
Karolyi, Bela
City:  
Romania
School:  
Sport:  
Gymnastics
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Martha and Bela Karolyi defected to the United States from Romania in 1981 and gymnastics in this country hasn't been the same since. The premier gymnastics coaches in the world, the Karolyis have lived in Texas since 1982 at their ranch outside of Houston. Karolyi's Camp is now the U.S. National team training center. In 1984 Bela was Mary Lou Retton's personal coach when she made history by becoming the first U.S. woman to win the gold medal in the individual gymnastics competition. The Karolyis served as coaches for the U.S. women's gymnastics team at the 1988 Olympics. Bela then coached the 1992 team to a bronze medal and Martha led the U.S. team to gold in 1996. In 1991 he led U.S. team to its first ever medal at World Championships (silver). Bela and Martha served as team coordinators for the 2000 & 2004 USA Olympic teams. Martha is currently the team coordinator and will continue in that position for the 2008 Olympics. At the 2005 World Championships the U.S. had it's most successful competition winning 9 medals. The Karolyis have coached 28 Olympians including during their careers in Romania and the United States. They have worked with nine Olympic champions, 15 World champions, 12 European medalists and six United States national champions. Some of their protégés include Nadia Comaneci, Mary Lou Retton, Julianne McNamara, Phoebe Mills, Kim Zmeskal, Betty Okino, Dominique Moceanu and Kerri Strug. He is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Class of 2005.
Name:  
Karolyi, Martha
City:  
Romania
School:  
Sport:  
Gymnastics
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Martha and Bela Karolyi defected to the United States from Romania in 1981 and gymnastics in this country hasn't been the same since. The premier gymnastics coaches in the world, the Karolyis have lived in Texas since 1982 at their ranch outside of Houston. Karolyi's Camp is now the U.S. National team training center. In 1984 Bela was Mary Lou Retton's personal coach when she made history by becoming the first U.S. woman to win the gold medal in the individual gymnastics competition. The Karolyis served as coaches for the U.S. women's gymnastics team at the 1988 Olympics. Bela then coached the 1992 team to a bronze medal and Martha led the U.S. team to gold in 1996. In 1991 he led U.S. team to its first ever medal at World Championships (silver). Bela and Martha served as team coordinators for the 2000 & 2004 USA Olympic teams. Martha is currently the team coordinator and will continue in that position for the 2008 Olympics. At the 2005 World Championships the U.S. had its most successful competition winning 9 medals. The Karolyis have coached 28 Olympians including during their careers in Romania and the United States. They have worked with nine Olympic champions, 15 World champions, 12 European medalists and six United States national champions. Some of their protégés include Nadia Comaneci, Mary Lou Retton, Julianne McNamara, Phoebe Mills, Kim Zmeskal, Betty Okino, Dominique Moceanu and Kerri Strug. She is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Class of 2005.
Name:  
Kimbrough, John
City:  
Haskell
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
John Kimbrough was an outstanding football player at Texas A&M University. He was named to the All-America team in 1939 and 1940. He led the Aggies to a national championship in 1939 and took them within one victory of a repeat in 1940 when the Aggies shared the Southwest Conference title. He was voted the nation's outstanding athlete of 1940 by Philadelphia sportswriters. After graduation, he entered the military and served in World War II. Following the war, he played professional football for three seasons (1946-1948) with the Los Angeles Dons before retiring from the sport. Kimbrough was inducted into the National Football Hall of Fame in 1954 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1958.
Name:  
Kinney, Bob
City:  
San Antonio
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
At 6'6, Robert Paul Kinney was the first "big man" from the Southwest Conference to earn consensus All-American honors in basketball. That was in 1942 after a three-year career as a starter at Rice Institute. With Kinney in the lineup, the Owls compiled 62-14 record, winning the Southwest Conference title in 1940 and sharing it in 1942. Low-scoring games were the norm at that time, yet Kinney totaled 1,000 varsity points. Not surprisingly, he won first team All-Southwest Conference honors three times and All-America twice. He later played with the champion Fort Wayne Pistons for five seasons and the Boston Celtics for three before retiring in 1950. Kinney was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1984.
Name:  
Kite, Tom
City:  
Austin
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Winning the 1992 U.S. Open Championship on the demanding Pebble Beach course put an exclamation point on the brilliantly consistent career of Thomas O. Kite, Jr. Kite won 19 PGA Tour events and was the first player in tour history to reach the 9 million dollar mark in career earnings. The dollar signs don't say it all about the former University of Texas golfer who, with Ben Crenshaw, led the Longhorns to a pair of NCAA titles in 1971 & 1972. Kite played on 19 National Teams including seven Ryder Cup appearances. He also captained the U.S. Ryder Cup team in 1997 at Valderamma, Spain. Kite won the Vardon Trophy for lowest per round scoring average in 1981 and '82 and was the PGA Player of the Year in 1989. He is currently playing on the Champions Tour where he has finished first nine times since 1999.
Name:  
Kitts, Jimmy
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball, Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Jimmy Kitts was responsible for two consecutive national high school basketball championships, as well as two Southwest Conference football titles and a Cotton Bowl victory within a 10-year span. At Athens High School, Kitts coached his basketball team to national championships in 1929 and 1930. He became the first high school coach to be purposely hired by a college to attract more Texas schoolboy talent. At Rice Institute, Kitts' first fully recruited team became co-champion of the Southwest Conference in basketball in 1933, and his football team became champion in 1934. Three years later, Kitts' football team captured the conference football championship after going scoreless the first three games of the season. That team later beat Colorado 28-14 in the 1938 Cotton Bowl game. Kitts was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1956.
Name:  
Koch, Barton
City:  
Temple
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Though All-America selectors of the era often overlooked Texas as prime football territory, they could not ignore Baylor guard Barton "Botchey" Koch after the 1930 season. That year Koch, a native of Temple, Texas, became the first consensus All-American from the Southwest Conference and the first from a Texas college. In addition, he was selected to play for the West in the annual East-West Shrine game at San Francisco and was voted the outstanding defensive player of the game. Wrote the San Francisco Chronicle: "There were a lot of great linemen in the game, but Koch was easily the best". He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1967.
Name:  
Koy, Ernie Sr.
City:  
Sealy
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Ernie Koy, Sr. was a three-time All-Southwest Conference athlete in both football (1930-1932) and baseball (1931-33) at the University of Texas. As a football running back, he helped his team win the Southwest Conference title in 1930, was the leading scorer in 1931, and was co-captain in 1932. In his senior year, he was named an All-American outfielder. After college, Koy played five seasons in the major leagues (1938-1942) with the Brooklyn Dodgers, St. Louis Cardinals, Cincinnati Reds and Philadelphia Phillies. While playing with the Dodgers, he made the National League All-Rookie team with a .299 average. Koy was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.
Name:  
Kraft, Clarence
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
During the glory years of Fort Worth baseball, 6 foot, 190 lb. Clarence "Big Boy" Kraft was an idol to fans of the "Fightin' Fort Worth Cats". As the first baseman for the Panthers, Kraft led his team to six consecutive Texas League flags and five Dixie Series against the Southern Association champions. During his six-year tenure in baseball (1918-1924), Kraft produced the Texas League career record for number of home runs (167) and number of RBI's (759) for one club. Swinging a 52 oz. bat, Kraft led the league in batting in 1921 with a .352 average. Kraft opted to retire at the peak of his career to operate an auto dealership in Fort Worth. Kraft was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1969.
Name:  
Kramer, Tommy
City:  
San Antonio
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Long before the rise of the spread offense Tommy Kramer was lighting up opposing defenses as one of the greatest passers in Texas football history. The San Antonio native threw for 257 yards and three touchdown passes while leading San Antonio Lee to a 28-27 thriller over Wichita Falls in the 1971 4A state championship game. During his senior season at Rice University Kramer led the nation in passing, was a consensus All-America and SWC selection and finished 5th in Heisman Trophy voting. Kramer finished his remarkable career at Rice by setting school records for yards in a season (3,317 in 1976) and career passing yards with 6,197. Kramer was also named MVP of the 1977 Senior Bowl. Known for his late game heroics, "Two-Minute Tommy" continued his aerial magic as the quarterback for the Minnesota Vikings from 1977-1989. Although injuries hampered his professional career, Kramer became the first player in NFL history to throw for over 450 yards on two different occasions. In 1986 he won the NFL's Comeback Player of the Year Award when he was the league's highest rated passer and earned a trip to the Pro Bowl. Kramer's career numbers total 24,777 passing yards and 159 touchdown passes. Kramer is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2009.
Name:  
Krebs, Jim
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
As a basketball player for SMU, James "Jim" Krebs was responsible for the team's success during the mid-1950s. In 1956, Krebs led the Mustangs to the NCAA semifinals before losing to Bill Russell and San Francisco University. The next year, SMU reached the Midwest Regionals before suffering an overtime loss to a Kansas team led by Wilt Chamberlain. Krebs led the Mustangs to three consecutive Southwest Conference championships while earning All-SWC honors each of those years, as well as All-American honors in his senior year. At the end of Krebs SMU career, he held school records of 50 points in a game, 282 points in a conference season, 624 points in a season, and 1,753 points in his career. Krebs played with the Minneapolis and Los Angeles Lakers of the NBA from 1957-1964. He scored 4,128 points in 515 games and was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1976.
Name:  
Krueger, Charlie
City:  
Caldwell, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2014
Caldwell, Texas native Charlie Krueger was a two-time All-America tackle at Texas A&M in 1956 & 1957. The 6’4”, 215 lb. Krueger was also a two-time All-SWC selection in 1956 & 1957. He helped Coach Bear Bryant’s 1956 Aggies earn a 9-0-1 record and the SWC championship. Krueger was captain of the 1958 College All-Star team that beat the Detroit Lions 35-19. In the 1958 NFL Draft he was the 8th pick overall by the San Francisco 49ers. He played defensive tackle for 15 seasons for the 49ers from 1959-1973. Krueger was All Pro three-time (1960, 1965 & 1970) and was selected to play in two Pro Bowls (1960 & 1964). His #70 jersey has been retired by the 49ers. Krueger’s brother Rolf was also an All-American OT at Texas A&M in 1968. Krueger is a member of Texas A&M’s Athletic Hall of Fame (1972) and was inducted into the College Football Hall Of Fame in 1983. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2014.
Name:  
Kutner, Malcolm
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Four years as a Naval officer in WWII shortened the opportunities of pro football for Malcolm James Kutner. But the former Dallas Woodrow Wilson and University of Texas athlete made the most of his six seasons with the Cardinals, then based in Chicago. In 1946 he led the team in receiving on offense and in interceptions on defense to earn Rookie of the Year honors. The next year he was team MVP and All-Pro as the Cardinals won the NFL title. Kutner had lettered three years each in football and basketball and one in track at Texas where he was an All-SWC and All-America end in 1941. He was elected all-state in basketball in 1938 as a member of Woodrow Wilson High's state championship team. He was also an All-City selection in football his senior year. Kutner was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1994.
Name:  
Labonte, Bobby
City:  
Corpus Christi
School:  
Sport:  
Auto Racing
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Bobby Labonte of Corpus Christi is the only driver in history to win a Busch Series (1991) and Winston Cup Championship (2000). The Busch Series victory was at Bristol International Raceway in 1991. His Winston Cup Championship came in 2000 with a victory at the NAPA 500 at the Atlanta Motor Speedway. That season he led the standings from April to November. Labonte drives the No. 71 for TRG Motorsports. Bobby & Terry Labonte are the only brothers in NASCAR history to win Winston Cup Championships. Labonte was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.
Name:  
Labonte, Terry
City:  
Corpus Christi
School:  
Sport:  
Auto Racing
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Terry Labonte of Corpus Christi has become NASCAR's Iron Man. Labonte started 655 consecutive races in a streak that began on Jan. 14, 1979 and ended Aug. 5, 2000. In April 1996 he broke NASCAR legend's Richard Petty all-time record for consecutive starts with 514. The "Ice Man" is entering his 33rd season. Labonte won Winston Cup Championships in 1984 and 1996. A member of the Hendrick Motorsports Racing Team, Labonte has 709 starts, twenty-tw wins, 182 top-five finishes and 361 top-ten finishes. Labonte was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.
Name:  
Landry, Tom
City:  
Mission
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Tom Landry began his career as an outstanding football player at Mission High School. At the University of Texas, he was a standout halfback and defensive back. He played in the NFL from 1950-1955 with the New York Giants eventually earning the job as assistant defensive coach. In 1960 he was hired as the first coach of the Dallas Cowboys, where he became known as an innovator. He pioneered the flex defense and made effective use of the shotgun offense. As coach of the Cowboys from 1960-1988 Landry compiled a 270-178-6 record. The Cowboys were the first pro team to go to five Super Bowls, winning two in 1971 and 1977. Landry was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1978 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1990. He joined the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor in 1993.
Name:  
Lane, Dick
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dick "Night Train" Lane (deceased) was a native of Austin who started his career at Anderson High School. He made Jr. College All-American at Scottsbluff Jr. College in 1947 and after joining the army, Lane made the 1952 LA Rams team as an undrafted free agent. It took the 6'2, 290 lb. defensive back 12 games to set the NFL record for most interceptions in a season (14) and by a rookie. His 68 career interceptions while playing for the LA Rams (1952-3), Chicago Cardinals (1954-9), and Detroit Lions (1960-5) ranks third in NFL history. Lane was voted All-NFL 5 times and went to 6 Pro Bowls. He was a member of the NFL's 75th Anniversary All-Time Team and was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1974. Lane was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.
Name:  
Lary, Yale
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
As a third round draft choice out of Texas A&M, Robert Yale Lary signed with the Detroit Lions for $6,500 in 1952. It was to be a windfall investment by the Lions. In 11 seasons, interrupted by two years in the Army, Lary was an All-NFL defensive back four times and played in nine Pro Bowls. The Fort Worth native was also a great punter, his career average of 44.29 per punt ranks third in NFL annals. The top three season averages in NFL history are owned by Texans: Sammy Baugh 51.4, Yale Lary 48.9 and Baugh 48.7. When Lary was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1979 he was the fifth defensive back ever so honored. The Fort Worth North Side graduate earned All-SWC honors in 1951 as a senior at A&M. Lary was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1994.
Name:  
Layne, Bobby
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Very little got in Bobby Layne's way when it came to winning. His success began at Highland Park High School in Dallas, where he quarterbacked the Scots to the state semifinals in his senior year. In 1944 as a freshman at the University of Texas, Layne began four years as quarterback and won 31 games. His passing records have been broken, but a record he holds on the Texas baseball squad has not been beaten. As a pitcher, Layne was undefeated against conference teams, winning 28 times. As a pro football player, Layne's records included 1,814 completions in 3,400 attempts and 196 touchdown passes. Quarterbacking Detroit in the 1950s, Layne led the Lions to NFL titles in 1952 and '53 and to the championship game again in 1954. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1960.
Name:  
Leaks, Roosevelt
City:  
Brenham
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Roosevelt Leaks was an all-state running back and linebacker for Brenham High School in 1969 and 1970. During his junior and senior seasons he rushed for 3,688 yards, 55 touchdowns and led Brenham to a 22-2-1 record. The Cubs won two district 10AAA championships and beat Bridge City 40-12 in the 1969 bi-district playoffs. As a senior, Leaks made the Parade High School All-America team and played in the 1971 THSCA All-Star Game. He later played at the University of Texas from 1972-1974 and made All-SWC running back in 1972 and 1973. His junior season he was a consensus All-America selection and finished third in the Heisman Trophy balloting. Leaks rushed for 2,923 yards during his career at Texas including a record 342 against SMU in 1973. He played in the NFL with the Baltimore Colts from 1975-1979 and the Buffalo Bills from 1980-1983. He was recently inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2005 and is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame's Class of 2006.
Name:  
Lemons, Abe
City:  
Walters, OK
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Abe Lemons (deceased) the king of the one-liners served as the University of Texas basketball coach from 1977 to 1982. He won over 100 games for the Longhorns (110-63) and led his teams to the 1978 & 1979 SWC titles. Although he led Texas to the 1979 NCAA tournament, his greatest season in Austin culminated with the 1978 NIT Championship with a 101-93 victory over North Carolina State in Madison Square Garden in New York City. Lemons tutored great players in Austin like Johnny Moore and the Longhorns first NBA 1st round draft pick LaSalle Thompson. His first job in the Lone Star state came at the University of Texas Pan-American from 1973-1976 where he compiled a stellar 55-16 record. During Lemons' 34 year coaching career he compiled a 599-343 record. Most of those seasons came at Oklahoma City University from 1955-1973 and again from 1983-1990. Lemons was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2008.
Name:  
Lester, Darrell
City:  
Jacksboro
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Darrell Lester was one of the great multi-talented athletes in Southwest Conference history. At Texas Christian University, he won nine letters in three sports as center on the football and basketball teams and as a pitcher for the baseball team. He captained the 1935 football team to a 12-1 record and a victory over LSU in the 1936 Sugar Bowl. Lester was the first two-time All-American selection in Southwest Conference history (1934, 1935) and in 1935 became the first player in TCU history to be named consensus All-American. After graduation, he played professionally with the Green Bay Packers for two years before a shoulder injury forced his retirement. Lester was later involved in the founding of the Bluebonnet Bowl and was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1987.
Name:  
Lewis, Carl
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Sports Illustrated calls Carl Lewis "the most enduring champion in track and field history". Others term the sprinter/long jumper the greatest athlete of his era, if not all time. The former University of Houston performer earned such acclaim by winning nine Gold Medals in four Olympics: the 100 meters, 200 meters, long jump, and 4X100 meter relay in 1984 at Los Angeles; the 100 meters and long jump in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea, the long jump and 4X100 meter relay in 1992 at Barcelona, Spain and the long jump in 1996 at Atlanta. Lewis missed other opportunities as an 18-year old Olympian in 1980 when the United States boycotted the Summer Games in Moscow. His unparalleled achievements also included eight Gold Medals in the World Championships. Lewis twice broke the world record mark in the 100 and six times in nine years he anchored the world record 4X100 relay team. Lewis was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.
Name:  
Lewis, Guy V.
City:  
Arp
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Guy V. Lewis was the most successful basketball coach in Southwest Conference history. He coached for 30 seasons at the University of Houston from 1956-1986 and had a 592-279 record. Lewis had 14 20-win seasons and three 30-win seasons. His teams went to 14 NCAA Tournaments and advanced to five Final Fours. Lewis coached 15 All-Americans and was named National Coach of the Year in 1968 and 1983. One of his biggest victories came on January 20, 1968, when college basketball's "Game of the Century" was played before more than 52,000 fans in the Astrodome. The Cougars and Elvin Hayes defeated UCLA and Lew Alcindor 71-69 to end the Bruins' 47-game winning streak. Lewis was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1994.
Name:  
Lillard, Bill
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Bowling
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Bill Lillard made bowling history in 1956 when he became the first man to win four titles in one American Bowling Congress tournament. Lillard also won the 1955 and 1956 Bowling Proprietors Association of America All-Star award. He was voted the Bowling Writers Association of America"s Bowler of the Year in 1956, and he earned Bowling Magazine"s recognition for first-team All-American in 1956 and 1957. Lillard was a charter member of the Professional Bowlers Association that was formed in 1959. During his career, Lillard won eight ABC titles between 1955 and 1971 to tie him with Fred Bujack for the most lifetime tournament championships. He also had five sanctioned 300 games and two sanctioned 299 games. Lillard was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1972.
Name:  
Lilly, Bob
City:  
Throckmorton
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Bob Lilly was the first player ever drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in 1961 and he eventually became one of the players who led the team into a generation of greatness. As the Cowboys' defensive tackle, the Cowboys achieved a victory in Super Bowl VI. He also won All-Pro honors and played in the Pro Bowl. His coach, Tom Landry, called him "the greatest Cowboy player ever." He was the first former player picked for the Cowboys Ring of Honor, and five years after his retirement he became the first former Cowboy to earn a place in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Lilly was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1975.
Name:  
Littlefield, Clyde
City:  
San Antonio
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Clyde Littlefield's record as an athlete and as a track and field / football coach at the University of Texas remains unmatched. As an athlete, he earned 12 letters in three sports: football, basketball, and track. He played on the undefeated 1914 Texas football team and played on the first Southwest Conference basketball and track and field championship teams in 1915. During his 41-year career as the UT track and field coach (1920-1961), his teams won 25 Southwest Conference championships and were dominant in the major relay meets of the United States. For seven of those years (1927-1933), he also served as head football coach and led the Longhorns to SWC championships in 1928 and 1930. Littlefield also doubled as cross-country coach for two decades and won 15 championships. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1958.
Name:  
Lopiano, Dr. Donna
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dr. Donna Lopiano was the University of Texas women's athletics director from 1975 to 1992. She was able to build University of Texas into the model women's athletic program in the nation and during her time there, she oversaw 18 national championships and more than 300 All-Americans. Lopiano was a leader in the Title IX movement to ensure equity in men and women's athletics. She has repeatedly been named one of "The 100 Most Influential People in Sports" by The Sporting News. Lopiano is a member of the United States Olympic Committee Executive Board and former president of the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women. She was also the former Executive Director of the Women's Sports Foundation and is a member of the University of Texas Women's Hall of Honor and Texas Women's Hall of Fame. She is currently the president and founder of Sports Management Resources. Lopiano was inducted into the hall of fame as part of the class of 2010.
Name:  
Lundquist, Verne
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Media
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Verne earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology from Texas Lutheran University in 1962 and received that school's Distinguished Alumnus Award. He lives in Steamboat Springs, Colorado with his wife, Nancy, and serves on the Board of Directors of the summer chamber music festival, "Strings in the Mountains". The Voice of the Dallas Cowboys from 1972-84, Verne was sports director at WFAA-TV in Dallas for 16 years and won seven consecutive Texas Sportscaster of the Year Awards (1977-83). He joined CBS Sports in 1982, and has called every figure skating competition on CBS since 1989, including the 1992, 1994, and 1998 Olympics. He switched networks to work for TNT beginning in 1995, and returned to CBS Sports in 1998. Lundquist serves as a play-by-play announcer for CBS' coverage of NCAA basketball, including the NCAA Men's Basketball Championship. Verne provided commentary for the Masters for more than 20 years, and has covered other PGA Tour events. He also spent eight years at ABC Sports. Lundquist was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2005.
Name:  
Lyons, Ted
City:  
Lake Charles, LA
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Ted Lyons, a three-sport star at Baylor, went almost immediately from the Waco campus to the major leagues, where he became a Hall of Fame pitcher. During a career that spanned three decades (1923-42, and 1946), Lyons served the Chicago White Sox for 21 seasons. He also managed the White Sox for three years. Although the team never won the pennant and finished in the first division only five times during Lyons' career, Lyons finished with a 260-130 lifetime pitching record. Lyons won 20 or more games in three years, all with second-division teams. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1985.
Name:  
Maegle, R.L.
City:  
Taylor
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dick Maegle of Rice Institute was one of the all-time great football players of the Southwest Conference. He was a two-way player, a great runner, and a skilled defensive back. In his junior year, he was a consensus All-American and played in the 1954 Cotton Bowl game against Alabama, in which he is remembered for being the victim of an off-the-bench tackle. That play overshadowed Maegle's record setting performance - 265 yards on 11 carries and three touchdowns. As a senior he led the conference with 905 yards rushing. He played in the NFL with the San Francisco 49ers (1955-1959) Pittsburgh Steelers (1960) and Dallas Cowboys (1961). Maegle was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.
Name:  
Mancuso, August
City:  
Galveston
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Galveston's August "Gus" Mancuso was a major-league catcher for 17 years (1928-1945). In his big-league career, he batted .265 in 1,460 games, including a remarkable .366 in 1933, his rookie year. He played for the St. Louis Cardinals (1928-32, 1941-42), New York Giants (1933-38, 1942-44), Chicago Cubs (1939), Brooklyn Dodgers (1940), and Philadelphia Phillies (1945). Mancuso, a two-time all-star, played in five World Series and was a member of championship teams with St. Louis (1931) and New York (1933). In 1936, he established a World Series single-game record for the most chances and putouts by a catcher. He was also the manager of the San Antonio Missions baseball team in 1948 & 1949. Mancuso was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.
Name:  
Mangrum, Lloyd
City:  
Trenton
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Lloyd Mangrum, a Trenton, Texas native, won 38 major professional golf titles during his illustrious career. Among his major victories was the 1946 U.S. Open at Canterbury Country Club in Cleveland. When the PGA tournament was decided by match play Mangrum was twice a semifinalist and two times a quarterfinalist. A two-time Vardon Trophy winner (1951 & 1953), he won the Los Angeles Open four times, the Western Open twice, the All-American three times, and the Phoenix Open twice. He was a member of the Ryder Cup team four times (1941, 1947, 1949, 1951) and served as captain twice (1953, 1955). In 1951, he was the tour's leading money winner. Mangrum was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1966.
Name:  
Mann, Gerald
City:  
Sulphur Springs
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Gerald Mann's leadership, passing, and running were instrumental in producing some of Southern Methodist University's finest hours in football during the 1925-27 seasons. Mann, known as the "Little Red Arrow" led SMU to a 20-4-3 record and a conference championship in 1926. A two-time All-SWC selection, he was also named to several All-America teams his junior and senior seasons. In the 1928 East-West Shrine game, Mann was one of four Texans who starred in the 16-6 upset of the East. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1962.
Name:  
Mansfield, Coy Herman
City:  
Big Spring
School:  
Sport:  
Rodeo
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
As a teenager in Bandera during the Depression, Toots Mansfield began roping calves "to try to earn some grocery money." He not only helped put food on the table, he launched a roping career that would make him a national hero in rodeo circles. Mansfield won a record seven world championships between 1939 and 1950. The charter member of the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame also dominated the event in every major rodeo throughout North America. His biggest payday was in "unofficial" money at Clovis, N.M., in 1947 when he won the winner-take-all pot of $14,500 - most of it from steer roping contestants who each paid a $1,000 entry fee. When a severe drought crippled his ranching business near Big Spring, Mansfield came out of retirement in 1955 to place third in world rankings at the age of 41. Coy Herman Mansfield also impacted his chosen profession outside the arena, serving four years as the first president of the Rodeo Cowboys Association. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.
Name:  
Marberry, Fred
City:  
Streetman
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Fred Marberry, born in Streetman, became baseball's first great relief pitcher. His combination of an overpowering fastball and near-perfect control helped the 1924 Washington Senators win the World Series over the New York Giants. Marberry played 14 years in the major leagues with the Washington Senators (1923-1932, 1936) Detroit Tigers (1933-1935) and New York Giants (1936). He achieved remarkable success in the 14 years he played in the major leagues. He went to the mound 551 times, winning 147 and losing 89. He was equally impressive in relief, posting a 53-37 record with 101 saves. Marberry was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1982.
Name:  
Martin, Harvey
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Harvey Martin is the greatest Dallas Cowboy player to ever suit up for his hometown team. A late bloomer at Dallas' South Oak Cliff High School, he travelled to Commerce, Texas where he quickly became the scourge of the Lone Star Conference. Martin earned NAIA All-American honors as a senior at East Texas State in 1972. That season he led the Lions to the NAIA Division I National Championship with a 21-18 victory over Carson-Newman. Martin was later named the Lone Star Conference Player of the Decade for the 1970s. The 6'5, 250 lb. Martin played defensive end for the Cowboys from 1973-1983. He was a four-time Pro Bowl selection (1976, 1977, 1978, 1979) and also made All-Pro four times (1976, 1977, 1979, 1982). His numerous honors include making the NFL's All-Decade Team for the 1970s and being named the 1977 NFL Defensive Player of the Year. His finest moment may have come in Super Bowl XII as he and teammate Randy White crushed the Denver Bronco by forcing eight turnovers and allowing only eight completed passes for 61 yards. The Cowboys won 27-10 and Martin and White earned Co-MVP honors. Martin was the Cowboys team leader in sacks for seven seasons and finished with 114 for his career. Martin passed away on Christmas Eve 2001 from pancreatic cancer at the age of 51. Martin is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2009.
Name:  
Martin, Othol
City:  
Jacksboro
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
After playing on TCU's first Southwest Conference championship team in 1929, Othol "Abe" Martin began a career as a high school football coach. He coached at El Paso, Lufkin, and Paschal High Schools. In 11 seasons, he won or tied for nine district championships and ended his high school coaching stint with a 95-14-1 record. In 1944, Martin joined the TCU coaching staff as an assistant to athletic director and head coach Dutch Meyer. Nine years later, Martin replaced Meyer as head coach, and over the next 14 years (1953-1966) Martin led the Frogs to five bowl games and an overall record of 74-64-7. In 1968, the "Jacksboro Philosopher" received the American Football Coaches Association's Amos Alonzo Stagg Award and was named to TCU's Letterman's Hall of Fame. Martin was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1972.
Name:  
Martin, Slater
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Slater Martin began his illustrious basketball career at Houston's Jefferson Davis High School where he led his team to three state tournaments and back to back state championships in 1942 & 1943. At the University of Texas, the 5'10 guard set a school record by scoring 984 points during his career (1944 & 1947-1949). Martin led the 1947 Longhorns to the SWC title with a 26-2 record and a trip to the NCAA Final Four where the Longhorns finished third. On February 26, 1949 Martin set the single game SWC scoring record with 49 points versus TCU. He earned All-SWC honors as a junior and senior and also made the Helms Foundation All-America team in 1949. Martin played 11 seasons in the NBA with the Minneapolis Lakers (1949-1956) and St. Louis Hawks (1956-1960). He was a member of teams that won five world championships (Minneapolis Lakers 1950, 1952, 1953, 1954 & St. Louis Hawks 1958) and was selected to play in seven NBA All-Star Games. Martin who was known for his speed, quickness and ball-handling skills was also a fine defensive player who was usually assigned to guard the other team's best player. He scored 7,337 points during his 745 game career for an average of 9.8 points per game. He also had 3,160 career assists and 2,302 rebounds. In 1981 Martin is a member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (1981) and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame (1964).
Name:  
Mathews, Eddie
City:  
Texarkana, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Eddie Mathews, a Texarkana, Texas, native, spent 17 years in the major leagues playing for the Braves in Boston, Atlanta and Milwaukee from 1952-66, the Houston Astros in 1967 and the Detroit Tigers in 1967 and '68. Playing a total of 2,391 games, Mathews had 2,315 hits, 512 homeruns, 1,453 RBIs, and a .271 batting average. He played on the 1968 Detroit Tigers and the 1957 and 1958 Milwaukee Braves World Series teams, winning two games in the 1957 series against the Yankees with homeruns in the 10th inning. Mathews made 12 All-Star Game appearances as both a third and first baseman, and in the 1959 game, he hit a first-inning homerun. After retiring, Mathews stayed close to the game managing the Atlanta Braves from 1972-74 and was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1978. Mathews was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the Class of 2012.
Name:  
Matson, Randy
City:  
Pampa
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Randy Matson became one of the greatest and most consistent shot-putters the world has known. In his junior year at Pampa High School, Matson proved his talent when he set records in 19 consecutive meets, including a record 64 feet 7 inches. His outstanding feats continued at Texas A&M. On April 22, 1967 at a College Station track meet he became the first man in history to hurl a 16-pound shot 71 feet 5 inches. In seven years, his record was 70 victories, nine seconds, and two thirds. Matson won the silver medal at the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo and the gold medal in the 1968 Olympics at Mexico City. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1974.
Name:  
Matthews, Bruce
City:  
Raleigh, NC
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Bruce Matthews, a lineman for the Houston Oilers/Tennessee Titans (1983-2001) played in 296 career games, the most in NFL history by a non-kicker. He had streaks of 232 consecutive games played and 229 games started- an NFL record. The 6'5, 300 lb. Matthews never missed a game due to injury during his career. He holds Oiler records for games played, consecutive games played, seasons and Pro Bowl appearances. In 2002 Matthews played in his 14th consecutive Pro Bowl tying him with Merlin Olsen for the most in NFL history. He played in 9 Pro Bowls at guard and five at center. Matthews played in over 40 NFL stadiums; blocked for 15 quarterbacks and 26 running backs during his 19-year career. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.
Name:  
Matthews, Raymond
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Raymond "Rags" Matthews is known for drawing national attention to Texas football as a result of his outstanding performance in the 1927 East-West Shrine Game. The All-SWC end from TCU led the West team to a 16-6 upset victory. Matthews was named the game's outstanding player and in 1968, was chosen as one of the game's all-time All-West team members. In 1969, he was selected as an all-time All-Southwest Conference end. Matthews was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1965.
Name:  
Maynard, Don
City:  
Colorado City
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Don Maynard, a halfback from the Texas Western University in El Paso, spent one season with the Giants of the NFL and one season in Canada before jumping to the rival American Football League. In 1960, he became the first player to sign with the New York Titans of the fledging AFL. Maynard joined Joe Namath on a Titans team which later became the New York Jets. They led the Jets to the historic 16-7 Super Bowl III victory over the Baltimore Colts of the NFL in one of the biggest upsets in sports history. In his 13 years with the Jets, Maynard set every club receiving record. His career totals include 633 receptions, 11,834 yards, 88 touchdowns and 50 games with 100 or more receiving yards. Maynard was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1983.
Name:  
McCloskey, John J.
City:  
Louisville, KY
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
John McCloskey's 50 years in baseball began in 1882 at Louisville and continued across the country as he organized, played, and coached professional baseball. The majority of his time, however, was spent in Texas. In 1887, a team he brought barnstorming through the state from Joplin, Mo., was matched up with the champion New York Giants in Austin in a three-game series. The Giants lost the first two games to player-coach McCloskey's team and then left town to avoid further embarrassment. McCloskey later accepted the job of organizing the Texas League for which he played, coached, and maintained during the remainder of his career. In 1888, McCloskey was recognized as "the Father of Texas League". In 1916 he organized the Rio Grande Baseball League in El Paso at Rio Grande Park. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1962.
Name:  
McFadin, Lewis
City:  
Iraan
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Lewis "Bud" McFadin of Iraan was a two-way lineman at the University of Texas. He earned All-American and All-Southwest Conference honors in 1949 and 1950. McFadin was drafted by the Los Angeles Rams, but because of an Air Force commitment, was unable to play until the final two games of 1952. He became a standout defensive tackle and played with the Rams for four additional years (1952-1956) with one Pro Bowl appearance. In 1956, a hunting accident nearly ended his career, but he came out of retirement in 1960 to join Denver in the AFL. As a player for Denver (1960-1963), he was All-AFL three times and played in three All-Star games. After four years with the Broncos, he moved to Houston (1964-1965) and played for two more years before serving five seasons as an Oilers assistant. McFadin was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1983.
Name:  
McMillin, Alvin Nugent
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Alvin Nugent "Bo" McMillin was a star at North Side High School in Fort Worth and an All-American at Centre College in Danville, Kentucky. McMillin was a standout player on the Praying Colonels of Centre, one of the best collegiate football teams in the nation. In 1921 the Colonels beat Harvard 6-0 on McMillin's 32 yard touchdown run - one the biggest upsets in college football history. McMillin later entered the coaching field where he also excelled. He turned in outstanding records at Centenary (1922-1924), Geneva (1925-1927) Kansas State (1928-1933), and Indiana (1934-1947). In 1945 he led Indiana to its first Big 10 championship and then moved on to coach the Detroit Lions from 1948-1950. McMillin was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1954.
Name:  
Meadows, Earl
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
After a record-breaking high school career in Fort Worth, Earl Meadows continued his achievements in the pole vault at the University of Southern California. In the 1936 Olympics, Meadows set a record of 14 feet, 3 inches during a 10-hour pole-vault marathon that ended long after other track and field events had concluded. In pursuit of setting higher records, Meadows and one of his teammates, Bill Sefton, became avid competitors. At the 1937 Pacific Coast Association meet in the Los Angeles Coliseum, Meadows and Sefton achieved their goal by setting world-record identical vaults of 14 feet, 11 inches. Meadows was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1963.
Name:  
Meadows, Sandra
City:  
Duncanville
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Legendary high school basketball coach Sandra Meadows won four state championships at Duncanville High School (1976, 1988, 1989, 1990). Meadows' 906-227 coaching record ranks 6th nationally for number of wins by a girls basketball coach. In Meadows 24 years at Duncanville her teams won 24 district championships and advanced to the state tournament 10 times. Duncanville set a state record with 134 consecutive wins from 1987-1991. Meadows was the TABC Coach of the Year in 1989 and 1990. In 1991 she was named Converse's National High School Coach of the Year. Meadows was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1998.
Name:  
Meredith, Don
City:  
Mount Vernon
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Before he entered the pro ranks, Don Meredith had a phenomenal career as a two-time All-America quarterback at Southern Methodist University. The Mount Vernon native joined the Dallas Cowboys as quarterback in 1960, the first year of the team's existence. Twice during his career, Meredith led the Cowboys to NFL championship games, losing both in 1966 and 1967 to Vince Lombardi's Green Bay Packers. Meredith was selected to two Pro Bowls. In 1966, he won the Bert Bell Award as the "Pro Player of the Year". After retiring from football, he worked for many years as a commentator for Monday Night Football. Meredith was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1977.
Name:  
Metcalf, Shelby
City:  
College Station
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Texas A&M's Shelby Metcalf holds four of the major coaching records in Southwest Conference basketball history: most seasons (27), most games (744), most victories (438), and most conference victories (239). His six SWC championships are No. 2 all-time behind SMU's Doc Hayes who won eight. In 27 seasons, Metcalf's Aggies won 20 or more games six times, won 10 or more games 25 times and appeared in five NCAA and four NIT championship tournaments. The Tulsa native was an All-American on East Texas State's national championship (NAIA) team in 1955. After Air Force duty in Germany, Metcalf began his coaching career at Class B Cayuga before moving to A&M as an assistant to Bob Rogers, his former coach at East Texas. Metcalf earned three college degrees including a doctorate at A&M. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1994.
Name:  
Meyer, Leo
City:  
Waco
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Leo "Dutch" Meyer's tenure at Texas Christian University (1934-1952) brought the university many honors. His spread formation, in which he used the double wing with two split ends and two or three wingbacks, improved the college passing game. Meyer's 1938 squad won the National Championship after going 11-0 and defeating Carnegie Tech 15-7 in the 1939 Sugar Bowl. During his 19-year career, Meyer coached three Southwest Conference champions and 10 All-America players, including Sammy Baugh, Davey O'Brien, I.B. Hale, and Ki Aldrich. He compiled a 109-79-13 record and took TCU to seven bowl games. Meyer was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1957.
Name:  
Modano, Mike
City:  
Livonia, MI
School:  
Sport:  
Hockey
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The top overall pick of the 1988 NHL Draft by the Minnesota North Stars, Mike Modano spent all but one of his 21 professional seasons with the Dallas Stars franchise (1989-2010). He led the Dallas Stars to the pinnacle of the NHL with a win over the Buffalo Sabres in the 1999 Stanley Cup Finals. Modano, a Livonia, Mich., native, is a six-time NHL All-Star who was also a member of three United States Olympic Teams. The 6-foot, 3-inch center is the Stars’ all-time leader in goals (557), points (1,359), assists (802) and game-winning goals (91) and was named NHL All-Star Game team captain in 2003. Modano is the most decorated United States hockey player in history. On March 17, 2007 Modano scored his 503rd career goal versus the Nashville Predators, breaking Joe Mullen’s record for most goals scored by an American player. On November 7, 2007 Modano reached another milestone when he scored two goals against the San Jose Sharks to break Phil Housley’s record of 1,232 points by an American player. Modano played the 2010-11 season with the Detroit Red Wings, then signed an honorary one-day contract with the Dallas Stars, allowing him to retire as a member of his longtime team. He is actively involved in the Mike Modano Foundation, which helps victims of child abuse. Modano was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2007.
Name:  
Moegle, Bobby
City:  
Lubbock, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Bobby Moegle won more high school baseball games than any coach in Texas history. When he retired from Lubbock's Monterey High School (1960-1999) he had more wins (1,115-266-1) than any coach in the country (he currently ranks fifth on the national list). Moegle has taken 13 teams to the 4A and 5A state tournaments, winning the state championship in '72, '74, '81, and '96, and finishing second in state four times. He's coached over 100 players who have continued their baseball careers at the collegiate level, 20 of whom signed professional contracts. Moegle is the founder of the Texas High School Baseball Coaches Association, a four-time Texas High School Coach of the Year, and was the National Coach of the Year in 1972. Moegle was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the Class of 2012.
Name:  
Moon, Warren
City:  
Los Angeles, CA
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Warren Moon holds every major Houston Oilers passing record: career attempts (4,546), completions (2,632), yards (33,685) and touchdown passes (196). His long road to stardom as an NFL quarterback began at the University of Washington and continued in the Canadian Football League where he was given a chance to play quarterback for the Edmonton Eskimos (1978-83). Moon promptly led the Eskimos to five consecutive Grey Cup titles from 1978-1982. Moon joined the Oilers from 1984-1993 and led the team to seven consecutive playoff appearances from 1987-93. When the Oilers developed the "Run and Shoot" offense in the 1990s. Moon's mobility, accuracy and arm strength were fully utilized. In 1991 he set an NFL record with 404 completions in a season. Moon played in six consecutive Pro Bowls from 1988-93. Ever generous with his time off the field, Moon was named NFL Man of the Year in 1989. His career totals after playing with the Vikings, Seahawks and Chiefs from 1994 to 2000 are: 6,823 attempts, 3,988 completions, 49,325 yards and 291 touchdowns. Moon was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006. Moon was inducted as a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame's Class of 2006.
Name:  
Moore, G.A. Jr.
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The "All Time Winningest Coach" in Texas High School football history is G.A. Moore, Jr. He celebrates 50 years of coaching in 2012. He is currently serving as Aubrey High School's head football coach. Inspiring high school football programs across Texas, he has compiled an amazing record of 429-97-9, along with eight state championships. Born and raised in Pilot Point, Moore played football, basketball, track and baseball, lettering 16 times. Named All State in football and basketball, he had his eyes on more than just sports. Also attending Pilot Point High was his future wife, Lois Ann, a freshman when he was a senior. They began dating in college, and celebrate 50 years of marriage together. He played football on scholarship at North Texas State University, graduating in 1962 with a Bachelor's of Science degree. He earned his Masters from NTSU in 1967. Moore started his coaching career in 1962 at Bryson High School, a team he elevated from losing 21 games in a row to 5-5 his first season. Moving home to Pilot Point the following year, he took the football team by the reigns. The Bearcats went from losing six seasons in a row to becoming a respected and legitimate team in 2A football. After taking a few years off from coaching, he returned to the football field in 1972 as head coach at Celina High School. With an impressive 52-5-2 record over the first five years, Moore led the Bobcats to a State Championship victory in 1974. In 1977, Moore went back to his home roots, again, and led Pilot Point to back-to-back state championships in 1980 and 1981. He stayed with the Bearcats for nine years, and in 1986 took over Sherman High School's football program, a team suffering 0-10 the previous year. Sherman defeated Gainesville in their first game, and turned around their 0-10 record to 6-4, which earned Moore the Dallas Area Coach of the Year. He spent the next 14 years back in Celina, leading the Bobcats to the best season they'd seen in ten years. In his first year, the Celina football team not only won their district championship, but also advanced to the state semifinals. Celina's impeccable 163-22 record earned five state championships, tied a state record of four championships in a row, and a 57 game winning streak. In 2002 he returned one last time to his hometown Pilot Point, serving as Athletic Director and Head Football Coach for 3 years. He refrained from coaching for 3 years, and in 2009 became Aubrey High School's head football coach. A man of great character, Moore credits his success on the field to something more than talent or ability. "I have been blessed by every measure in winning games and coaching good kids, but the winning came when I got things straight with the Lord," said Moore. "It wasn't about my ability." Honored in the North Texas Athletics Hall of Fame and the Texas High School Coaches Hall of Honor, Moore says induction into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame (Class of 2011) is "the biggest honor by far."
Name:  
Morgan, Joe
City:  
Bonham
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Joe Morgan was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1990, his first year of eligibility. The Bonham native became only the 10th second baseman inducted at Cooperstown. Most of Morgan's 22 years in the majors were spent with the Houston Astros and Cincinnati Reds. The stocky lefthanded hitter clubbed 268 homeruns, most ever by a second baseman. He also drew 1,865 walks and stole 689 bases. Morgan's career was likewise as impressive as defensive player. The five-time Gold Glover set most of the National League fielding records: most putouts, most assists, most consecutive errorless games, and fewest errors in a season. He was voted the N.L.'s Most Valuable Player in 1975 and '76 when the Reds won consecutive World Series titles. In 1973 Morgan had become the first player ever to hit 25 or more homeruns and steal 60 or more bases in the same season. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1996.
Name:  
Morris, J. Walter
City:  
Rockwall
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
J. Walter Morris began his professional baseball career in 1902 as a player with Corsicana of the Texas League. He moved into managing teams, including San Antonio and Beaumont of the South Texas league. He bought, operated, and sold a half-dozen teams over the years. In 1909, he purchased his first team, the Fort Worth franchise in the Texas League. Morris was elected to executive positions in six different minor leagues, the first from 1915 to 1920 when he served as president of the Texas League. Morris later served as president of four other leagues, including West Texas, the Cotton States, East Texas, and Evangeline. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1966.
Name:  
Morrison, Ray
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Ray Morrison was SMU's first football coach serving from 1915-1916 and then from 1922-1934. He also coached at Vanderbilt University (1918, 1935-1939), Temple University (1940-1948), and Austin College (1949-1952). Under Morrison's tutelage, the SMU Mustangs became the first team in the Southwest to invade the East, beginning with an intersectional schedule in which they played from coast to coast. His SMU teams became known as the "aerial circus" and won three Southwest Conference championships (1923, 1926, 1931). Morrison is credited for inventing the "Statue of Liberty" play, the five-man defensive line, and was instrumental in getting the SMU's Ownby stadium built. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1963.
Name:  
Morrow, Bobby
City:  
San Benito
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Bobby Morrow of San Benito was one of the most celebrated sprinters in track and field history. As a freshman at Abilene Christian College, he ran a wind-aided 9.1 seconds in the NAIA 100-yard dash finals. During his collegiate career, he posted a record of 80 wins and only eight losses. He won the NAIA sprint titles three times and was named to the NCAA All-America team three times. Morrow ran the 100-yard dash in 9.3 seconds on at least seven occasions. It was during the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne that Morrow became recognized as a world-class athlete. He won three gold medals and earned the title of World's Fastest Human as a result of his victories in the 100 and 200 meter dashes and his record-setting victory in the 400 meter relay. Morrow was also awarded the 1956 Sullivan Award as the nation's premier amateur athlete. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1960.
Name:  
Moser, Chuck
City:  
Abilene
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Chuck Moser began his football career at Missouri where he lettered three years (1937-39) as a center/linebacker and was All-Conference as a senior. After graduation, he switched to coaching and achieved even greater success. In 1946, he began a coaching career at McAllen High School in Texas, where he compiled a seven-year record of 55-20-0. Moser's reputation as a coach was made during his tenure at Abilene High School from 1953-1959. His teams won three consecutive 4A state championships (1954,1955,1956) and had a state record 49-game winning streak. In seven seasons his record at Abilene was 78-7-2. His overall record for 15 seasons was 141-28-2. Moser was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.
Name:  
Mulkey, Kim
City:  
Hammond, LA
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
One of the most decorated individuals in women's basketball history, Kim Mulkey has turned the Baylor Lady Bears into a national power, winning two national championships (2005, 2012), including leading the first NCAA team in history-men or women-to a 40-0 record in a single season in 2012. In 12 seasons at Baylor (2000-01 to present), Mulkey has posted a 338-79 (.811) record. Mulkey has 12 straight 20-win seasons, 11 NCAA tournament appearances, seven trips to the Sweet Sixteen, four trips to the Elite Eight and three trips to the Final Four. In 2003, the only season the Lady Bears didn't make the NCAA tourney field, they advanced to the WNIT final game. In 2005 the Lady Bears, led by Big 12 Player of the Year Sophia Young, swept the Big 12 regular season and tournament titles. In the NCAA tournament they knocked off LSU and Michigan State in the Final Four to win the program's and the Big 12's first women's NCAA basketball National Championship. Mulkey then made history by becoming the first person, man or woman, to win an NCAA title as a player, assistant coach and head coach. As a player, Mulkey led the Lady Techsters to a 130-6 record, two national titles and four Final Fours from 1980-84. During that time the 5 foot, 4 inch playmaker, known for her spectacular passes and French braids, also led Louisiana Tech to its first two national championships (1981 and 1982) and was a part of the USA's Gold medal-winning team at both the 1984 Olympics and the 1983 Pan American Games. In 2000, she was inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. Mulkey, a graduate of Hammond (La.) High School, is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2009.
Name:  
Munchak, Mike
City:  
Scranton, PA
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The first offensive linemen selected in the 1982 NFL draft, Mike Munchak played 12 seasons for the Houston Oilers from 1982-1993. He played guard on an offensive line that took the Oilers to seven consecutive playoff appearances (1987-1993). Munchak was voted All-Pro six times and played in nine Pro Bowls. Munchak's No. 63 jersey was retired by the Oilers in 1996. In 2001, he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Only one year after his retirement, Munchak joined the Oilers coaching staff as an assistant. After three years, Munchak was promoted to offensive line coach, a post he filled from 1997 to 2010, after which Munchak was named the head coach of the Tennessee Titans. Munchak led the Titans to a 9-7 record and a second-place finish in the AFC South during his first season as head coach in 2011. The Penn State graduate was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.
Name:  
Murchison, Clint Jr.
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Working in partnership with his brother John, Clint Murchison, Jr. fulfilled a long-standing dream by founding the Dallas Cowboys Football Club in 1960. Their ownership, which encompassed 24 seasons, was officially commenced with Clint, Jr.'s first official act: the hiring of General Manager Tex Schramm. Working in tandem, the two men then went on to bring both Head Coach Tom Landry and Personnel Director Gil Brandt into the fold. After hiring them, Clint, Jr. gave them a great deal of latitude in carrying out their duties. It was a management approach he was accustomed to using in all his business ventures. As he once revealed, in his mind it was a no-brainer: "I'd rather let the folks who know what they are doing run things." Over the years he supported the trio unconditionally and drew wide acclaim after the disastrous 1963 season when he quieted critics, who were calling for Landry's removal, by signing him to a new 10 year contract. Clint, Jr.'s faith in his coach and the others was handsomely rewarded. After finding their stride in the mid 60s the team went on to post a record-setting 20 consecutive winning seasons. Yet even more impressively during the Murchison era with Landry at the helm between 1966-1983 the Cowboys qualified for the post-season play-offs 17 out of 18 times. Included among these appearances were 5 trips to the Super Bowl during the 70s and two World Championships in 1971 and 1977. Murchison was inducted into the hall of fame as part of the class of 2010.
Name:  
Murray, Ty
City:  
Stephenville
School:  
Sport:  
Rodeo
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
On December 13, 1998 Ty Murray of Stephenville, Texas made rodeo history when he won his record seventh Pro Rodeo Cowboy Association All-Around World Title. Known as the "King of the Cowboys" Murray is the greatest cowboy in the history of the sport. He competed in rodeo's three roughstock events: bareback, saddle bronc and bull riding. Murray set a record for single season earnings with $297,896 in 1993 and at age 23 was the youngest cowboy to break the 1 million dollar mark. Murray ranks second on the PRCA Career Earnings list. Murray retired from the sport on May 14, 2002. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.
Name:  
Neely, Jess
City:  
Smyrna, TN
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The secret of Jess Neely's success as a college football coach was his belief in sticking to the basics. He felt that being able to block and tackle, and do it well, was what enabled a team to win. Neely served as head football coach at Southwestern of Memphis (1924-27), Clemson (1931-39), and Rice (1940-66). At Rice, Neely produced eight All-American players, saw his team win two Southwest Conference championships, tie for two others, and play in six bowl games. By the end of his career, the Owls had a 144-124-10 record, and Neely had won three times as many games than any previous Rice coach. Neely also served as athletic director at Rice and was responsible for the construction of a 70,000-seat stadium and a 6,000-seat fieldhouse. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1970.
Name:  
Nelson, Byron
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The one record that is likely to remain intact in professional golf is Byron Nelson's 11 consecutive tournament victories in 1945. His scoring average in that phenomenal streak was an incredible 68.33 strokes per round during 120 rounds of competition. Nelson was born on February 4, 1912 in the farming community of Long Branch near Waxahachie. He began his golf career as a caddy (along with Ben Hogan) at the Glen Garden Country Club in Fort Worth. In 1939 Nelson won the U.S. Open at the Philadelphia Country Club as well as the Vardon Trophy for lowest scoring average in a year. He won the PGA championship (1940, 1945), and the Masters (1937 and 1942) twice and was on the Ryder Cup team in 1937 and 1947. He finished in the money 113 consecutive times. Nelson was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1955.
Name:  
Neyland, Bob
City:  
Greenville, TX
School:  
Sport:  
football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Bob Neyland, a native of Greenville, excelled as an athlete, engineer, army general, and football coach. While attending West Point, he was the starting end on Army's 1914 National Championship team. He was an outstanding pitcher in baseball and was also the cadet heavyweight boxing champion for three years. He was the head football coach at Tennessee from 1926-1952 with two interruptions for military service. Neyland won the 1951 National Championship and had a career record at Tennessee of 173-31-12. His 1939 team didn't allow a point in the regular season. Amazingly, Neyland's defenses tallied shutouts in 112 of the 216 games that he coached. Nine of his 21 teams played the regular season without a defeat, and in one stretch the Volunteers lost only once in 62 games. His innovations include the early use of film and communicating with coaches in the press box with a telephone wire. After he retired from coaching he served as the University's athletic director untile his death in 1962. On October 20, 1962, the University of Tennessee's football stadium in Knoxville was renamed in his honor. Neyland was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1985.
Name:  
Nguyen, Dat
City:  
Rockport, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2014
Dat Nguyen began his illustrious career at Rockport-Fulton High School and soon became one of the most decorated football players in the history of Texas A&M University. From 1995 to 1998 the 5’11”, 238 lb. linebacker averaged 10.7 tackles per game for Texas A&M’s Wrecking Crew defense and set a school record with 517 career tackles. Nguyen also became the first Aggie to lead his team in tackles four consecutive years. A three- time All-Big 12 pick, he was the Conference’s defensive player of the year in 1998. His senior season he made the All-America team, and also won the Chuck Bednarik and Lombardi Awards. Nguyen played with the Dallas Cowboys from 1999-2005 becoming the first Vietnamese-American to play in NFL. He earned NFL All-Pro honors in 2003. After a neck injury shortened his career Nguyen became the linebackers coach with Dallas Cowboys (2007-09) and later with Texas A&M University from 2010 to 2011. He was inducted into the Texas A&M Athletic Hall of Fame in 2004 and in 2007 joined the AT&T Cotton Bowl Hall of Fame. He currently works as the host of “The Blitz” on ESPN 1250 radio in San Antonio. Nguyen was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2014.
Name:  
Nobis, Tommy
City:  
San Antonio
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Tommy Nobis achieved success at every level of football. At Thomas Jefferson High School in San Antonio, Nobis earned All-State honors. He continued his success at the University of Texas, where he earned honors as a linebacker and an offensive guard. He was an All-American twice and a consensus selection in 1965. He was also the only sophomore starter on the Longhorns' 1963 national championship team that defeated Navy in the 1964 Cotton Bowl Classic. The next year he helped Texas upset No. 1 Alabama in the Orange Bowl. As a senior, Nobis won the Outland Award and Maxwell Trophy. He later played with the Atlanta Falcons and was selected Rookie of the Year by the NFL coaches and the Pro Football Writers Association. He enjoyed a successful 10-year career in Atlanta and was named to the NFL All-1960's team and Football News' All-Time All-America team. Nobis was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.
Name:  
Norton, Homer
City:  
Carrollton, Alabama
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Homer Norton started his coaching career at Centenary College, where he served for eight seasons and had undefeated teams three times. At Centenary, Norton's teams won 20 consecutive games and shut out 14 consecutive opponents. He later was hired by Texas A&M, and in 1939 and 1940 the Aggies won 19 consecutive games, becoming the 1939 national champions and the 1940 Southwest Conference co-champions. In 1941, the Aggies won the Southwest Conference, making Norton the first coach to win three consecutive league titles. Norton coached at Texas A&M from 1934-1947 winning 60 percent of his games with a 14-year record of 82-53-9. Norton is also credited with building the first coaching tower to observe practices. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1968.
Name:  
O'Brien, Davey
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Although Davey O'Brien stood only 5 feet, 7 inches and weighed 152 pounds, he became one of the all-time giants of football. At Texas Christian University, his jersey number was retired after he quarterbacked the Horned Frogs to an undefeated national championship season in 1938. That year he was a unanimous All-American and became the first player to win all three major awards (the Heisman, Walter Camp, and Maxwell) in the same season. After graduation, O'Brien played with the Philadelphia Eagles for two years (1939-40). He was All-Pro and Rookie of the Year in 1939. In 1977 the Davey O'Brien Award was founded in his honor and is given annually to the nation's top collegiate quarterback. O'Brien was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1956.
Name:  
O'Neal, Dick
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dick O'Neal set every major Southwest Conference record in basketball while at Texas Christian University. In his three varsity seasons of 1955-57, O'Neal held season and career records for most field goals, free throws, and points scored. Remarkably, he is still tied for second for the Southwest Conference record for most free throws in a conference game (22) and is ranked in the top five all-time in both season and career scoring. In 72 games with the Horned Frogs, O'Neal scored 1,723 points for a per-game average of 23.9. O'Neal's single-game bests were 49 points, 17 field goals, and 22 free throws. The 1955 All-American was a three-time All-SWC performer. O'Neal was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1985.
Name:  
O'Neal, Shaquille
City:  
San Antonio, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Shaquille O'Neal's successful basketball career began in San Antonio, Texas, at San Antonio Cole High School. Experiencing a major victory for the first time, he led Cole to a 3A state title in 1989 and then continued this title-winning tradition in the NBA. As a Los Angeles Laker, O'Neal won three consecutive world championships from 2000-'02, and won another world championship in 2006 with the Miami Heat. His 19-year NBA career included eight first-team All-NBA selections, 15 All-Star Games, and in 1996, O'Neal was named to the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History. He was the NBA MVP in 2000 and the NBA Finals MVP in 2000, '01, and '02. O'Neal averaged 23.7 points per game, 10.9 rebounds per game and 2.3 blocks per game, with a total of 13,099 rebounds and 28,596 points during his career. O'Neal was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the Class of 2012.
Name:  
Olajuwon, Hakeem
City:  
Lagos, Nigeria
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Hakeem Olajuwon, a native of Nigeria, led the Houston Cougars to three straight NCAA Final Four appearances. He was named MVP of the 1983 NCAA Tournament and was a consensus first team All-American in 1984. Olajuwon was the first pick in the 1984 NBA Draft. Olajuwon played 17 seasons for the Houston Rockets from 1984-2001. He is the team's all-time leader in points (26,511), rebounds (13,382), blocked shots (3,740), steals (2,088) and games (1,177). Olajuwon also set the NBA record for career blocked shots. A 12 time All-Star, he was named the NBA's MVP in 1994. "The Dream" led the Rockets to NBA championships in 1994 and 1995. He was named NBA Finals MVP both years. In 1996 he was selected as one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history. Olajuwon was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1998.
Name:  
Osterman, Cat
City:  
Houston, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Softball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Softball pitcher Cat Osterman, a native of Houston and graduate of Cypress Springs HS, won 136 games for the Texas Longhorns and led her teams to three NCAA softball world series. One of the most accomplished athletes in softball history, Osterman broke virtually every University of Texas pitching record. She set NCAA records for strikeout ratio for season (15.42) & career (14.34). Osterman also ranks 5th all-time in NCAA in shutouts (28), 8th all-time in wins (136) & 2nd all-time in strikeouts (2,265). She was the first NCAA pitcher to break 2,000 strikeout mark. A four-time Big 12 Pitcher of the Year she was also a member of Olympic teams in 2004 (gold medal) & 2008 (silver medal). Osterman's impressive resume also includes 20 NCAA no-hitters and 10 perfect games. Osterman is currently the assistant softball coach at St. Edward's University in Austin. Osterman was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2012.
Name:  
Pardee, Jack
City:  
Christoval, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Jack Pardee began his football career playing six-man football in Christoval, Texas. In 1956, Pardee's senior year at Texas A&M, he was co-captain of an undefeated team and was an Academic All-American. He also made the All-SWC and All-America teams that year. Said Aggie coach Paul "Bear" Bryant, "Jack Pardee is the best linebacker I ever had." Pardee played linebacker in the NFL for 15 years with the Los Angeles Rams (1957-1964, 1966-1970) and with the Washington Redskins (1971-1972). Pardee later became a head coach with the Chicago Bears (1975-1977), Washington Redskins (1978-1980), University of Houston Cougars, (1987-1989) and the Houston Oilers (1990-1994). He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1987.
Name:  
Parker, Raymond
City:  
Kemp
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Raymond "Buddy" Parker was known for his achievements as a football player and coach. As a rookie halfback in 1935, Parker helped the Detroit Lions win their first NFL title. During his coaching career, Parker served as assistant coach for the Chicago Cardinals and helped them win their first title in 1947. The native of Kemp, Texas became head coach of the Lions in 1951 and began building a reputation as an offensive genius. In his six seasons, Detroit won three division crowns and two world championships. Parker left the Lions with a 50-24-2 record to take over a struggling Pittsburgh franchise. His eight Steeler's teams did not win a title but became competitive with a 51-47-6 record. By the end of his 14-year coaching career, Parker had compiled a 101-71-8 record. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1984.
Name:  
Parks, Dave
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Former Texas Tech All-American Dave Parks joins the Class of 2011 as one of the greatest players in Texas football history. Parks was the first Red Raider to earn First Team All-American status and is the only former player from Texas Tech to be the No. 1 pick in the NFL draft. He was selected in 1964 by the San Francisco 49ers. Born in Muenster, Texas, and raised in Abilene, Parks became a star receiver at Tech. Blessed with "great hands" and the ability to make the big catch, he was consistent throughout his career. While at Tech, Parks established nearly every receiving record for the university. He held the career reception record at 80, most yards in a season at 499, had 32 single season receptions in both 1962 and 1963. Other record are single game receiving yards of 132 and the most career receiving yardage at 1,090. Parks was a multi-talented athlete, recognized for his ability to play both offense and defense. He had a remarkable 98-yard interception against Colorado in 1963, ensuring a 13-12 win for the Red Raiders. It's a record that still stands today. Parks also punted and was honored as one of the nation's best blockers. Parks was selected as an All-Southwest Conference receiver his last two seasons. He made the Associated Press First Team All-American squad following his senior season in 1963. Parks was joined on that team by future NFL legends Roger Staubach, Dick Butkus and Gale Sayers. The honors continued to roll in. He was recognized with consensus honors as a split end by The Sporting News, Boston Recorder-American, Sports Extra, American Football Coaches, Time Magazine and Football Weekly. Parks was rewarded with invitations to the East-West Shrine Game, the Senior Bowl, the Coaches All-America Game, and was named to the Chicago Tribune's All-Stars. Playing for the West in the East-West Shrine Game, Parks blocked the game-winning extra point attempt by the East. In the Senior Bowl, he hauled in a George Mira touchdown pass to preserve the South's 20-12 victory. Parks spent 10 years playing in the NFL with San Francisco (1964-67), New Orleans (1968-72), and Houston (1973). He played in three consecutive Pro Bowls his first three years and was named to the All-Pro Rookie Team. Statistically, his best year in the pros was in '65 when he finished with 80 catches and over 1,300 yards and 12 touchdowns. For his career, Parks finished with 360 receptions for 5,619 yards and 44 TDs. He had a remarkable average of 15.6 yards per catch. Inducted into the National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame, Moore continues to inspire Raider football fans today as a living legend. "Dave Parks is one of our greatest football players," said former Texas Tech Athletic Director Gerald Meyers. "He's been successful at all levels and we're proud of the things Dave accomplished." Parks has served as the associate director of the Texas Ranger Law Enforcement Association and on the executive board of Dallas' NFL Retired Players Association. He also invented the "Speedy Weedy" a lawn and garden tool that he manufactures and sells. Parks is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2011.
Name:  
Pate, Joe
City:  
Alice, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Joe Pate pitched eight of his 12 years in the Texas League with the Fort Worth Cats, producing an excellent record. The lefthander pitched 386 games, winning 193 and losing 91. In 2,534 innings, he struck out 970 batters. His remarkable career included six consecutive seasons, 1920-1925, in which he won 20 or more games for a total of 153 victories. He played on seven first-place Fort Worth clubs and on six pennant winners. By the end of his career, he was known as the only pitcher to win 30 games twice (1921, 1924). He finished with a career winning percentage of .680. Pate was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1972.
Name:  
Patterson, Jack
City:  
Merkel, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Jack Patterson played a significant role in track and field at four Southwest Conference schools: Rice, Houston, Texas, and Baylor. As a student at Rice University, he set a conference record in the high hurdles. After graduation, he became a teacher and coach and later headed the track and field program at the University of Houston where he developed nationally recognized sprinters and relay teams. In 1955, he became head coach at Baylor, and five years later the Bears won their first Southwest Conference track and field championship. Patterson eventually took over the track program the University of Texas, where he led the Longhorns to three Southwest Conference championships and was promoted to assistant athletic director. Patterson was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.
Name:  
Pearson, Drew
City:  
South River, NJ
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Drew Pearson, a Dallas Cowboy, from 1973-1983 was on the receiving end of the most historic pass in franchise history, the "Hail Mary" in the 1975 playoff game against the Minnesota Vikings. Pearson, an undrafted receiver out of the University of Tulsa, became one of the best Cowboy receivers in history. He played in three Super Bowls with the Cowboys, winning Super Bowl XII and catching a touchdown in Super Bowl X. During his career Pearson caught 489 passes for 7,822 yards and 48 touchdowns. The 6'0 184 pound receiver was selected to three Pro Bowl and All Pro teams in 1974, 1976 and 1977. No. 88 was selected to the 1970s NFL All Decade Team. Pearson is currently the chairman of the board for Drew Pearson Marketing Inc. which manufactures and distributes officially licensed sports headwear. Pearson was inducted into the hall of fame as part of the class of 2010.
Name:  
Penick, Dr. Daniel A.
City:  
Austin
School:  
Sport:  
Tennis
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dr. D.A. Penick is known as the father of Texas tennis. He was the tennis coach at the University of Texas from 1908 until he retired in 1957 at the age of 87. Throughout these years, Penick produced many successful players. His coaching record includes all of the 10 Southwest Conference team championships given during his tenure, 27 of the 41 singles crowns, and 31 of the 41 doubles crowns. Overall, his players won five NCAA doubles and two singles championships. In honor of his remarkable coaching tenure, the Penick Bowl became the top award in collegiate tennis, which was presented to the NCAA team champion during the 40s and 50s. Penick was also one of the early presidents of the Southwest Athletic Conference (1922-34). He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1962.
Name:  
Penick, Harvey
City:  
Austin
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Harvey Penick dedicated more than 80 years to the sport of golf. He was first introduced to golf in 1912 at the age of 8 when he became a caddie at Austin Country Club. Four years later, he was promoted to a part-time assignment in the pro shop. In 1923, he was named head professional at the Austin Country Club and remained in that post for 55 years. He earned a national reputation as the pro's pro, the instructor sought out by top players on the men's and women's tours. Among his students were Ben Crenshaw, Tom Kite, Don Massengale, Kathy Whitworth, Mickey Wright, and Sandra Palmer. Penick was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1985.
Name:  
Perkins, Don
City:  
Waterloo, Iowa
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Before joining the Dallas Cowboys in the franchise's second season, Don Perkins made a name for himself as an All-American football player at the University of New Mexico. Perkins was a three-time All-Skyline Conference running back for the Lobos. He was also the nation's leading kick returner as a senior in 1959. Perkins quickly made an impact with the Cowboys earning NFL Rookie of the Year honors in 1961. The 5'10, 200lb. back became the first Cowboys player to rush for over 6,000 career yards (1961-68). His career total of 6,217 rushing yards ranks third in franchise history behind only Tony Dorsett and Emmitt Smith. Perkins finished on the NFL's top ten rushing list each season that he played. He played in six Pro Bowls and earned All-Pro honors in 1962. Don Perkins was enshrined in the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor in 1976. Perkins was a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame's Class of 2006.
Name:  
Pettitte, Andy
City:  
Houston, Texas
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
2016
Few compare to former New York Yankees and Houston Astros pitcher Andy Pettitte in postseason pitching dominance. The Houston, TX, native is an eight-time pennant winner, five-time World Series champion and three-time All-Star over 18 seasons with the New York Yankees (1995-2003, 2007-2010 and 2012-2013) and Houston Astros (2004-2006). Pettitte holds numerous MLB postseason records. He is MLB’s all-time leader in postseason wins (19), starts (44) and innings pitched (276.2). Additionally, he is the first pitcher in MLB history to start and win deciding games in the League Division Series, League Championship Series and World Series in the same season (2009). As well as the only pitcher in history with six post season series-clinching wins. Pettitte led MLB in wins (148) from 2000-2009 and the only pitcher since 1930 to win 12+ games in his first nine seasons. Pettitte is the only pitcher to pitch at least 18 Major League seasons without ever finishing with a losing season. He finished his career with a record of 256-153, ranking 42nd on MLB’s all-time wins list and 11th among lefties. The New York Yankees retired his number (46) on August 23, 2015.
Name:  
Phillips, O.A.
City:  
Orange, Texas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
O.A. "Bum" Phillips began his illustrious coaching career in Nederland in 1950. The native of Orange, Texas coached a total of 13 years at the high school level, 6 years in college, and 17 years in the NFL - 11 years as head coach and general manager. Phillips coached the Houston Oilers from 1975-1980 with a 59-38 record. In 1978 and 1979 the Oilers advanced to the AFC Championship Game but lost to the Pittsburgh Steelers. Appointed head coach and general manager of the New Orleans Saints in 1981, Bum moved to Louisiana where he brought the Saints out of the cellar. After five years there, Bum retired from football and moved back home to Texas to pursue his first love, ranching. Phillips was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.
Name:  
Quick, Richard
City:  
Dallas, TX
School:  
Southern Methodist University
Sport:  
Swimming
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2015
One of the greatest coaches in the history of collegiate swimming, Richard Quick began his career as an all-state and All-American swimmer at Highland Park High School. A three-time All-American at SMU (1963-1965) for Coach Red Bar, Quick was also the SWC Champion in 100 & 200m butterfly in 1965. He began his coaching career at Houston's Memorial High School (1965-1971), guiding his team to six state championships before returning to SMU, where he served as an assistant coach on the men's side for four years (1971-1975). In 1976 he started the women's swim program at SMU then went on to coach the Iowa State men (1977-78), the Auburn men and women (1978-1982), the Texas women (1982-1988) the Stanford women (1988-2005) and the Auburn men and women (2007-2009). Quick coached a record 13 NCAA championship teams. His teams won five consecutive NCAA titles at Texas (1984-1988), seven at Stanford and one at Auburn (2009). He coached 96 All Americans to over 750 All American honors and won 22 conference championships. A six time NCAA Coach of the Year by the College Swimming Coaches Association of America he was also that organization's first ever Lifetime Achievement Award winner in 2009. He was given the honor of coaching U.S. Olympic swim teams in 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000 & 2004. Quick was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 2000 and the University of Texas Women's Athletic Hall of Honor in 2004. Quick passed away on June 10, 2009.
Name:  
Randle, John
City:  
Hearne
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
John Randle is a Hearne, Texas native. While at Texas A&I he was named Lonestar Conference Lineman of the Year twice and was a 1988 All-American. Randle went undrafted but played 14 seasons in the NFL, 11 of them with the Minnesota Vikings (1990-2000) and three with the Seattle Seahawks (2001-2003). The 6'4 287 pound defensive tackle is the career sacks leader with 137.5 for his position. Randle sacked Brett Favre more times than any other quarterback during his career. He also led the league in sacks in 1997 with 15.5. No. 93 was named an All Pro seven times and was also named to the NFL's All-Decade Team in the 1990s. He was selected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2010. Randle was inducted into the hall of fame as part of the class of 2010.
Name:  
Rankin, Judy
City:  
St. Louis, MO
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Judy Rankin burst upon the golf scene at age 15 when she played in her first U.S. Women's Open. She won 26 tournaments on the LPGA Tour from 1968-1979 including the 1976 Dinah Shore. In 1976 Rankin was the first woman to break the $100,000 mark for a single season. A two-time player of the year (1976, 1977), she also won the Vare Trophy three times for the lowest stroke average (1973, 1976, 1977). Rankin successfully captained the U.S. team to victory in the 1996 and 1998 Solheim Cup competitions. She is currently a commentator for men's and women's golf on ABC. She was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1998.
Name:  
Redin, Harley
City:  
Plainview, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Legendary coach Harley Redin coached the Wayland Baptist Flying Queens from 1955-1973 compiling a 431-66 record. In 18 seasons his teams made 17 AAU Tournaments and won six National Championships. Redin actually began as the Wayland Baptist men's coach from 1946-1957 compiling a 205-118 record and making three postseason appearances. The Queens won the first 76 games that Redin coached, and later an amazing 131 consecutive games. Redin also had a fine international career guiding his teams to gold medals at the 1959 & 1971 Pan American Games. In 1964 he coached the U.S. World Championship Team and was one of the first coaches to compete against the Russian National Team. Harley coached 36 All-America players and 32 of his players played on U.S. National teams. Redin pioneered rule changes like the five player full court game, 30 second shot clock and the unlimited dribble which helped to modernize the women's game. He also wrote two books, The Queens Fly High in 1958 and A Basketball Guide for Girls in 1971. In 1999 Redin was inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. He is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Class of 2004.
Name:  
Reese, Eddie
City:  
Daytona Beach, FL
School:  
Sport:  
Swimming
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Eddie Reese began his illustrious swimming career as a two-time state champion in the 200m individual medley at Mainland High School in Florida. In 1963 at the University of Florida he became the first swimmer in school history to win five SEC titles. After coaching at Florida and Auburn he accepted the job at the University of Texas in 1979. Under his guidance the Longhorns have won 10 NCAA National Championships (1981, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2010). Texas' 10 titles are second all-time behind Michigan & Ohio State's 11. His teams have won an amazing 31 consecutive conference titles including 17 SWC (1980-1996) and every Big 12 title (14) since the league was formed in 1996. He has coached 42 individual NCAA champions, 31 NCAA champion relays, 204 All-Americans and 26 Olympians who have won 29 gold medals. In 1992 he coached the United States men's swimming team at the Olympics in Barcelona, Spain. Reese has been voted NCAA Men's Swimming Coach of the Year eight times: 1981, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2001. Reese was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2002.
Name:  
Reeves, Dan
City:  
Rome, GA
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dan Reeves wasn't born in Texas but he got here as fast as he could. A star quarterback at the University of South Carolina, he earned the attention of the Dallas Cowboy scouts. A running back for the Cowboys from 1965-1972, the versatile Reeves garnered 1,990 rushing yards and 1,693 receiving yards. His best year came in 1966 when he rushed for seven touchdowns, tied for second in the league and was voted to The Sporting News All Pro Team. The Cowboys made the playoffs every year of Reeves's playing days - reaching the Super Bowl twice and culminating in a 24-3 victory over the Miami Dolphins in Super Bowl VI following the 1971 season. One of Coach Landry's trusted lieutenants, Reeves served as an assistant coach with the Dallas Cowboys from 1970-1980. From 1981-2003 Reeves served as a head coach for the Denver Broncos, New York Giants and Atlanta Falcons. He led the Broncos and the Falcons to a total of four Super Bowl appearances. He currently is a color analyst for NFL games on the Westwood One Radio Network. Reeves is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2009.
Name:  
Renfro, Mel
City:  
Houston, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Considered by many as the finest defensive back in Dallas Cowboys history. Mel Renfro terrorized offenses from 1964-1977. He was named to the Pro Bowl his first 10 seasons in the league. He holds the club record for interceptions (52) and kickoff return average (26.4). Renfro played in four Super Bowls with the Cowboys and was named MVP of the 1971 Pro Bowl. He was drafted in the second round in 1964 after a career as an All-American halfback and world class sprinter at Oregon. A five-time All-Pro, Renfro has been inducted into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor and the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1998.
Name:  
Renfro, Ray
City:  
Leonard, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Ray Renfro was an All-America halfback in 1951 at North Texas where he also ran a 9.5 in the 100-yard dash and was on sprint relay teams that swept the Texas, Kansas, and Drake Relays. Forty years after his NFL playing career, Ray Renfro still figured prominently as a receiver in the Cleveland Browns record book. During his 12 seasons with the Browns (1952-1963) he averaged 19.6 yards per catch and had 55 career touchdowns. Renfro played on two NFL championship teams (1954, 1955) and in three more title games. The fourth round draft choice also played in three Pro Bowls. He was an assistant coach with the Dallas Cowboys for five seasons (1968-1972) and was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.
Name:  
Retton, Mary Lou
City:  
Fairmont, West Virginia
School:  
Sport:  
Gymnastics
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
At Sixteen years old Mary Lou Retton became America's sweetheart at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles. In a tight dual with Romanian gymnast Ecaterina Szabo for the all-around title, Retton finished her rotation with perfect scores of 10 on the floor exercise and vault. She became the first U.S. woman in history to win a Gold Medal in the All-Around gymnastic competition. Retton was a member of the U.S. Silver medal gymnastic team and also won medals in the Vault (Silver) Floor Exercise (Bronze) and Uneven Bars (Bronze). Her five medals in 1984 were the most of any Olympic Athlete. Later that year Retton was named Sports Illustrated's Sportswoman of the Year & AP Athlete of the Year. She also became the first woman to be featured on the front of a Wheaties cereal box. Retton moved to Houston in 1983 to train under former Romanian gymnastic coach Bela Karolyi. She still lives in Houston and remains active in United States Gymnastics and the U.S. Olympic Team movement. Retton was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2004.
Name:  
Reynolds, Carl
City:  
LaRue, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Carl "Bubba" Reynolds became one of Texas' many legendary baseball stars. A four-sport standout at Southwestern University, he became the fifth four-letter athlete in the school's history. In baseball, he compiled a .500 batting average in his senior year and was later signed by the Chicago White Sox. He played with the White Sox for four years (1927-1931) and then spent time with the Washington Senators (1932, 1936) where, in 1932, he had a .305 batting average. During the rest of his major-league career, he played with the St. Louis Browns (1933), Boston Red Sox (1934-1935), and the Chicago Cubs (1937-1939). By the end of his 13-year career, Reynolds had compiled a .302 batting average and had played in 1,222 games. Reynolds was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1971.
Name:  
Richards, Paul
City:  
Waxahachie, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Paul "Sleepy" Richards devoted a half-century of his life to baseball with great success at every level. Richards played on Waxahachie High School teams that won 65 consecutive games from 1924 to 1927. He signed his first pro baseball contract with the Brooklyn Dodgers, but it was only after Richards switched from third baseman to catcher that he achieved major-league success. His playing career ended in 1945 after winning the World Series for Detroit with a bases-loaded triple in the seventh game against the Chicago Cubs. He continued his career as a manager for the Chicago White Sox (1951-1954) and the Baltimore Orioles (1955-1961). He was known as an astute tactician who had the ability to revive the careers of veteran pitchers. Richards was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1959.
Name:  
Richards-Ross, Sanya
City:  
Austin, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
2003-2004
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2014
Sanya Richards-Ross from Kingston, Jamaica wasn’t born in Texas but she got here as fast as she could. In two short years at the University of Texas (2003-2004) she became a five-time 400m NCAA champion and earned All-America honors 11 times. Richards-Ross joined esteemed 400m coach and fellow TSHOF member Clyde Hart in 2004 and the pair quickly set their sights on Olympic gold. At the 2004 Athens Olympics she was a member of the U.S. gold medal 400m relay team. In 2008 at Beijing she again won gold on the 400m relay but settled for bronze in the 400m after suffering a mid race cramp. Leading up to the 2012 Olympics she became the U.S. indoor and outdoor champion in the 400m and then topped it off by winning the World Indoor championship as well. At the 2012 London Olympics she accomplished a rare feat by winning gold in both the 400m & 4x400m relay. Her 400m victory made her only the second American woman to ever win the event and the first to do so since Valerie Briscoe-Hooks in 1984. She is the American record holder in the 400m (48.70) and a six-time U.S. outdoor 400m champion. Richards-Ross also won a total of six world championship titles in her two events. Her impressive resume includes the IAAF World Female Athlete of the Year and the Jesse Owens Awards in 2006 & 2009. In 2005 she was named the Visa Champion and Humanitarian Athlete of the Year. In 2011 she was inducted into the University of Texas Women’s Hall of Honor. She is married to New York Giants cornerback Aaron Ross. Richards-Ross was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2014.
Name:  
Richardson, Nolan
City:  
El Paso
School:  
University of Texas-El Paso
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2015
El Paso native Nolan Richardson is the only coach to win a junior college (Western Texas Junior College 1980), NIT (Tulsa 1981) and NCAA (Arkansas 1994) basketball championship. The El Paso Bowie High School product played forward for fellow TSHOF member Coach Don Haskins at Texas Western from 1960-1964. Richardson's greatest fame came as coach at the University of Arkansas (1985 to 2002) where he became the first African American to coach at a major university in the South. He became the school's winningest coach (389-169), took the Razorbacks to three Final Fours and was named the National Coach of the Year in 1994. His 1994 squad (31-3) was one of the finest in NCAA history, defeating Duke 76-72 in the title game. The following season the Razorbacks again advanced to the Final Four losing to UCLA in the title game. Richardson's teams employed a full court press and up tempo style of play that was nicknamed "forty minutes of hell". His career division I record is 508-206 and his teams reached the postseason 16 times. Richardson also served as the coach of the Panama and Mexico national teams and the WNBA's Tulsa Shock. He was inducted into the College Basketball Hall of Fame in 2008 and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2014.
Name:  
Rickard, George
City:  
Henrietta, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Boxing
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
George "Tex" Rickard was the world's foremost boxing promoter until his death in 1929. Some of his most famous fights included the Jack Johnson-James Jeffries bout on July 4, 1910 in Reno, Nevada. And the Jess Willard-Jack Dempsey world championship match on July 4, 1919 in Toledo, Ohio. He promoted five fights, the first being the 1921 "Battle of the Century," in which heavy-weight champion Jack Dempsey battled "Gorgeous" George Carpenter. The match brought in a crowd of 80,183 and grossed $1,789,238. Rickard handled four other matches in which Dempsey fought, including the one in which Dempsey lost his title to Gene Tunney. Rickard staged the return known for the infamous "Long Count," in which Dempsey failed to regain his title. That bout grossed move than $2 million, at that time the largest live gate in history. Rickard was also the founder and original owner of the New York Rangers hockey team - one of the NHL's "Original Six" franchises. The rodeo arena in Henrietta, Texas where he briefly served as town marshall was also named in his honor Rickard was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1964.
Name:  
Riley, Polly
City:  
Fort Worth, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Fort Worth native Polly Riley was one of the greatest women golfers in Texas history. She played on the Curtis Cup team six times and was captain in 1962. Riley won the very first LPGA Tour event in 1950-the Tampa Open-as an amateur. She also won the Southern Amateur six times, the Western Amateur twice, the Trans-Mississippi three times, the Texas Open three times, the Texas Amateur twice, and was runner-up in the U.S. Open and National Amateur. Her victories included more than 50 regional and invitational tournaments. She played the great Babe Didrikson Zaharias five times in head-to-head competition and won three times, making Riley the only player to have a career advantage over Zaharias. Riley was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1978.
Name:  
Ritter, Louise
City:  
Red Oak
School:  
Sport:  
High Jump
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
High jumper Louise Ritter broke the collegiate women's high jump record her freshman year at Texas Woman's University. Under the tutelage of coach Bert Lyle, Ritter won three NCAA high jump championships from 1977-1979. The Red Oak native set an American record in the high jump in 1987 and was a member of three U.S. Olympic teams (1980, 1984, 1988). At the 1988 games in Seoul, South Korea, Ritter defeated the reigning world champion Stefka Kostadinova of Bulgaria in a jump off for the gold medal. Ritter's jump of 6 feet, 8 inches set an Olympic record. She was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1997.
Name:  
Robinson, David
City:  
Key West, Florida
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
During his career David Robinson amassed over 16,000 points, 7,000 rebounds, 2,000 blocked shots and 2,000 assists for the San Antonio Spurs. "The Admiral" was named 1989-90 NBA Rookie of the Year and has been selected to eight All-Star Teams. Robinson, the NBA Defensive Player of the Year in 1991-92, was the first person to play on three U.S. Olympic Basketball teams: 1988, 1992 and 1996. To complete his stellar resume Robinson led the San Antonio Spurs to the 1998-99 NBA Championship with a 4-1 victory over the New York Knicks in the finals. In 1996 he was named one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history. Robinson was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.
Name:  
Robinson, Jackie
City:  
Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
After leading Fort Worth Paschal High School to the 1945 state championship, Jackie Robinson continued his successful basketball career at Baylor University. The year before Robinson joined Baylor, the Bears did not win a game. As a freshman, Robinson averaged 14 points when most teams were only averaging 40 points a game. He led Baylor to a 25-5 record and the conference title. In 1948 Robinson's leadership on the floor took the Bears to the NCAA finals, but they lost in the title game to Kentucky. His 20 points in each of the regional playoff games earned him a spot on the 1948 gold medal winning U.S. Olympic team. In his years at Baylor, Robinson was selected All-SWC three times and was named All-America in 1948. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1966.
Name:  
Rodriquez, Ivan
City:  
Arlington, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2014
Ivan “Pudge” Rodriguez, a native of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico, began and ended his 21-year career with the Texas Rangers. He began catching for the Rangers as a 19 year old rookie in 1991. From 1991 to 2002 he helped the Rangers win three AL West division titles (1996, 1998 & 1999). He joined the club again for a season in 2009 before eventually retiring as a Ranger in 2012. He played 1,507 games with the Rangers and is second in club history in hits (1,747), doubles (352), and multi-hit games (490). He ranks third in at-bats (5,754), triples (28) and homers (217). He’s fourth in games (1,507), runs (866), RBI (842), total bases (2,806) and extra base hits (597). Rodriguez won 10 of his 13 Gold Glove Awards and made 10 of 13 All-Star Game appearances wearing a Rangers uniform. In 1999 Rodriguez was named the American League’s MVP when he hit 35 homeruns, 113 RBIs and had a batting average of .332. Also known for his strong arm behind the plate, Pudge threw out 46% of runners who attempted to steal on him during his career. In 2013 Rodriguez became the 16th member of the Texas Rangers Hall of Fame. He currently works for the Texas Rangers as an instructor, ambassador as well as a Special Assistant to the General Manager. Rodriguez was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2014.
Name:  
Rote, Kyle
City:  
San Antonio, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Kyle Rote had a spectacular prep career at Thomas Jefferson High School in San Antonio where he earned All-State honors in basketball and football. At Southern Methodist University he was twice named All-SWC (1949 & 1950) and was a consensus All-America in 1950. Rote's talent was best illustrated his junior year during a game against Notre Dame, the undefeated national champions. He rushed for 115 yards, scored three touchdowns, and completed 10 passes but SMU came up short against the Irish by a score of 27-20. The Texas Sportswriters Association voted Rote's play "the outstanding individual performance by a Texan in the first half century". Rote was the first pick in the 1951 NFL Draft. He played 11 seasons with the New York Giants from 1951-1961. Although a knee injury hampered his career, he was still selected to three Pro Bowls and holds the Giants' record with 48 touchdown catches. Rote was so respected by his teammates that 14 named sons after him. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1962.
Name:  
Rote, Kyle Jr.
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Soccer
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Kyle Rote, Jr., a Dallas native, became the first American born soccer player to win the NASL's (North American Soccer League) scoring title when he had 30 scoring points in 1973. During his illustrious career with the Dallas Tornado & Houston Hurricane he had 128 career scoring points and retired as the Tornado's all time leader in goals, assists and points scored. Rote also earned the honor of being the first Texan to play for the U.S. National Soccer team. He played in five games for the U.S. from 1973-1975. Rote added to his list of honors by competing in the ABC Superstars Competition against athletes like O.J. Simpson, Pete Rose, Julius Erving, Lynn Swann and others. Rote won the event three times in a four year span - 1974, 1976 & 1977. He played college soccer at Sewanee in Tennessee where he set game, season & career scoring records. Rote is also a member of the Tennessee Sports HOF (2002)and the U.S. Soccer Hall of Fame (2010). He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2008.
Name:  
Rote, Tobin
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
San Antonio native Tobin Cornelius Rote played college and professional football from 1946-1964. Beginning his collegiate career at Rice University, he played quarterback for the Owls from 1946-49 and led the team to a 10-1 record his final year. Three times he led the Owls to the Southwest Conference Champions. Turning pro in 1950, he was selected by the Green Bay Packers in the second round of the NFL draft. He became the starting quarterback his first year and spent six of his seven seasons as the leading passer for the Packers. He was also an outstanding runner and led the Packers in rushing three of his seven seasons. According to analysts, Rote was one of the most under-rated quarterbacks in the NFL. He ranked third in the NFL in passing touchdowns, first in rushing yards by a quarterback and second in touchdowns during his time with Green Bay. The 1956 season was a year to remember Rote's impact in the NFL. Although the Packers were an unimpressive 4-8, he led the entire NFL in passing yards and passing touchdowns and ranked second in rushing touchdowns. He scored a total of 29 touchdowns, the highest single-season total to date. The Packers' offense, other than Rote, scored an underwhelming 5 out of 29 touchdowns the same season. He also led the league in pass completions, pass attempts, rushing attempts and rushing touchdowns. To this day Rote's 1956 achievements rank among the greatest in history of NFL. Rote was traded from the Packers 1957 and divided his remaining years among several teams: the Detroit Lions, San Diego Chargers, Denver Broncos and Toronto Argonauts. While playing for Detroit, Rote split time with Bobby Layne. He actually ended up with more passing touchdowns, fewer interceptions, more wins and fewer losses during his time with the team. When Layne broke his leg that season, Rote was left to lead the team - - all the way to an NFL title. Noted as one of the greatest playoff performances in history, the Lions defeated the Cleveland Browns 59-14, with Rote completing 12 of 19 passes for 280 yards and four touchdowns. After a losing season in 1959, with an aging and untalented Lions team, Rote decided to head to Canada to play for the Toronto Argonauts. In his first season he became the Canadian Football League's second quarterback to surpass 4,000 yards and broke all passing records. After two years in Toronto the San Diego Chargers persuaded him to return to America. He spent two seasons in the American Football League, winning the Chargers a league title and being named and captured the Associated Press Player of the Year Award. He played with the Denver Broncos for three games in 1966 and then retired. During his 13 seasons and 149 games of professional football, Rote accumulated many impressive statistics. He passed for 18,850 yards, rushed for 3,128 yards and had a total of 149 touchdowns. He's the only quarterback to lead his team to both an NFL and AFL championship. At the time he retired, Rote had more rushing yards than any quarterback in NFL history. He now ranks 7th all-time. Rote was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1974. He passed away on June 27, 2000. Rote is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2011.
Name:  
Routt, Joe
City:  
Chapill Hill, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The mid-1930s were not successful years for the Texas A&M football teams, yet lineman Joe Routt accomplished feats that established him as one of the Aggies' all-time great players. In describing Routt, famed sportswriter Grantland Rice once said, "He was a glutton for hard, all-afternoon play and was at his best when the going was toughest." In 1938 Routt appeared in the annual East-West Shrine Game in San Francisco and was the first Aggie to win All-America honors twice (1936, 1937). Routt went to war in 1940 as an U.S. Army Infantry captain and was killed in action in 1944. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1952.
Name:  
Royal, Darrell
City:  
Hollis, OK
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
In 23 years as head coach, Darrell Royal never had a losing season. Twenty of those years were spent at the University of Texas from 1957 to 1976 during which time his teams compiled a record of 167-47-5. His Texas teams won 11 Southwest Conference championships. He also led the Longhorns to 16 bowls and three national championships (1963, 1969, 1970). The Longhorns finished in the Top 10 eleven times and 77 of his players won All-SWC honors, while 26 won All-America laurels. Royal is credited with two revolutionary innovations in offensive strategy: his Flip-Flop Winged-T in 1962 and the Wishbone in 1968. Royal was twice named Coach of the Year by the American Football Coaches Association and won the same distinction three times from the Football Writers of America. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1976.
Name:  
Runnels, Pete
City:  
Lufkin, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
In his 14 years in the major leagues, Pete Runnels of Lufkin, Texas, won two American League batting crowns. He hit .320 in 1960 and .326 in 1962, and was runner-up to Ted Williams for the 1958 crown. Runnels played on American League All-Star teams in 1959, 1960, and 1962 and had a lifetime batting average of .291. He hit over .300 for five consecutive seasons, had 20 or more doubles six times, and tied a major-league record with nine hits in a doubleheader. During his baseball career, Runnels played with the Washington Senators (1951-1957), Boston Red Sox (1958-1962) and the Houston Colt .45�s (1963-1964). Runnels was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1982.
Name:  
Russell, H.N.
City:  
Brownwood, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Rusty Russell became famous as the football coach at Masonic Home, a school for orphans in Fort Worth. The "Mighty Mites" often played and defeated schools with much larger players and enrollments. Starting in 1932 Masonic Home was allowed, by a special vote of Fort Worth's 7A district schools, to "play up" and join the district. Competing in the state's largest classification, Russell used a wide-open spread offense to negate his team's lack of size. His brilliant 16 year run at Masonic Home that included - a class B title in 1931, a loss to Corsicana in the 1932 state championship game on penetrations, and three other trips to the semi-finals. Russell served as President of the Texas High School Coaches Association in 1935-36. He later coached at Highland Park from 1942-1944 where he tutored Bobby Layne and Doak Walker. After serving five seasons as an assistant coach at SMU Russell accepted the head job from 1950-1952. Russell also coached at Schreiner College and Victoria Jr. College and Howard Payne (1962-63). He is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame (1981) and the THSCA Hall of Honor (1961). Russell's career high school coaching record was 181-40-14.
Name:  
Rutherford, Johnny
City:  
Fort Worth, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Auto Racing
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Fort Worth native Johnny Rutherford had competed for 10 years in the Indianapolis 500 without getting the checkered flag. At the beginning of his 11th try in 1974, he sat on the inside of the ninth row in the 25th position among 33 cars. He caught up with the leaders in the first 50 miles and, 175 laps later, he fought off every challenger and won the race. Proving he belonged among the racing greats, Rutherford returned to finish second in 1975 and won again in 1976. He claimed a third Indy victory in 1980, the year he collected almost every honor available to a race driver. Rutherford was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1982.
Name:  
Ryan, Nolan
City:  
Alvin, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The Alvin, Texas, native Nolan Ryan was one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history. Ryan pitched a record 27 seasons with the New York Mets (1966, 1968-1971) California Angels (1972-1979) Houston Astros (1980-1988) and Texas Rangers (1989-1993). He holds the major league record for career strikeouts (5,714), the only player ever to eclipse the 5,000-strikeout mark; career no-hitters (seven); single-season strikeouts (383); and career walks (2,795). The 6-foot, 2-inch, 195-pound right-hander had a career record of 324 wins and 292 losses. Known as "The Ryan Express,: Ryan's fastball was regularly clocked at speeds of 100 miles per hour. Along with Jackie Robinson, the eight-time All-Star Ryan is the only other major league player to have his jersey retired by at least three teams (Angels, Astros, Rangers). Ryan, who is also tied for first in MLB history with 12 one-hitters, was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1999 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1985. Following his playing career, Ryan took up ownership in two Texas-based minor league teams, the Corpus Christi Hooks and the Round Rock Express, before being hired as the president of the Texas Rangers in 2008. Ryan later partnered with Chuck Greenberg to purchase the Rangers from owner Tom Hicks in August 2010. After Greenberg sold his stake in the Rangers in 2011, Ryan became the team's principal owner.
Name:  
Sanford, J. Curtis
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dallas oilman J. Curtis Sanford came up with the idea for the Cotton Bowl Classic after travelling with SMU to watch the 1936 Rose Bowl. In 1937, using $6,000 of his own money, Sanford matched Texas Christian University and Marquette in the first Cotton Bowl, which attracted 17,000 people. Sanford could not always sign the Southwest Conference winner, however, so after the fourth Cotton Bowl in 1940, he assigned rights to the game to the Cotton Bowl Athletic Association with the agreement that he would be a lifetime member of the executive committee. The CBAA succeeded in signing the SWC champion as host team from 1941-1995, which assured the Cotton Bowl's success as a major attraction. Sanford was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.
Name:  
Schramm, Tex
City:  
Dallas, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
As the general manager of the Dallas Cowboys from 1960-1988, Tex Schramm was a key figure in turning the Cowboys into one of the most successful professional sports franchises in history. In 1959 Schramm was hired by club owner Clint Murchison Jr to build the Dallas Cowboys. Schramm then hired head coach Tom Landry and director of player personnel Gil Brandt. From 1960-1988, these men led the Cowboys to 20 consecutive winning seasons, 18 playoff appearances, and five Super Bowls with two championships. Schramm was also a key figure in the success of the NFL especially when he and AFL founder Lamar Hunt orchestrated the AFL-NFL merger, which culminated in 1970. As the NFL Competition Committee chairman for 23 years, Schramm advocated such innovations as wireless referee microphones, the wild-card playoff system, wider out-of-bounds stripes, sudden-death overtime, moving the goal posts to the back of the end zone and instant replay. In 1975 he created the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor. The University of Texas graduate started his career as a sportswriter for the Austin American-Statesman then worked ten years for the Los Angeles Rams beginning in 1947. He then worked briefly for CBS television where he came up with the idea of televising the Winter Olympics. In 1991 he became the first non-player or coach to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.
Name:  
Scovell, Field
City:  
Dallas, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Field Scovell's career in sports began as a player in high school and college before he became a prominent figure in football administration. At North Dallas High School, he earned four letters each in football, basketball, and baseball. He was an all-city and all-state end in football, and at Texas A&M he lettered in football. He later became a member of Texas Tech's Board of Regents, served as a Director of the Dallas Cowboys, and was a member of Texas A&M Letterman's Association. He served as Chairman of the Cotton Bowl team selection committee for almost 30 years and then was on the executive committee of the Cotton Bowl Athletic Association. The Field Scovell Award, which was named in his honor, has been given annually to the nations outstanding sports figure since 1965 by Dallas All-Sports Association of which he was the director. Scovell was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.
Name:  
Segrest, James
City:  
Bangs, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
As the lone representative of Bangs High School at the 1954 state meet James Segrest single handedly won the class B state title when he scored 34 points. Under the guidance of Coach Oliver Jackson, Segrest was a member of the 440 yard and 880 yard relay teams at Abilene Christian that set five world records in a three year span. The Wildcats team of Bobby Morrow, Segrest, Bill Woodhouse and Waymond Griggs became the first to run the 440 yard relay in under 40 seconds breaking the NCAA, American and world records with a time of 39.9 in 1957. They later reset those records with a 39.7 in 1958. Segrest was also a member of the 1958 U.S. track team that participated in the first dual meet with the Soviet Union in Moscow. He began his coaching career by guiding Monahans to the 1966 state championship. Segrest later served as the head track coach (1973-88) and athletic director (1988-95) at Odessa Junior College. His teams won 11 NJCAA National Championships, five indoor (1981-85) and six outdoor (1981-86). He was selected to coach the World University Games in 1978 and is a member of the NJCAA Track & Field Hall of Fame (1989), Abilene Christian Sports HOF (1991) and the United States Track Coaches Assn. Hall of Fame (1996). He is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Class of 2005.
Name:  
Sewell, Harley
City:  
St. Jo, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The greatest honor Harley Sewell won in high school was second-team all-district as a fullback, but his achievements throughout the rest of his football career pushed him into the limelight. As a two-way guard on offense and defense for the University of Texas, he won All-Southwest honors twice and All-America recognition in 1952. He was named outstanding lineman of the 1953 Cotton Bowl as Texas held Tennessee to a record 32 yards total offense with minus 14 yards rushing. A No. 1 draft choice, Sewell joined the Detroit Lions and was a member of the 1953 world championship team. Although he was one of the NFL's smaller offensive lineman, Sewell blocked his way to four Pro Bowls during 10 seasons with the Lions (1953-1962) and one with the Los Angeles Rams (1963). He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1984.
Name:  
Sharp, Marsha
City:  
Tulia, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
A former basketball player at Wayland Baptist and former head coach of the Texas Tech Lady Raiders, Marsha Sharp spent 24 seasons with the Lady Red Raiders, where she compiled a career record of 572-189 (.752), including a national championship in 1993. From 1992 to 1996, the Lady Raiders won consecutive Southwestern Conference titles. Sharp, a native of Whidbey Island, Wash., was named 1999 Big 12 Coach of the Year after leading Texas Tech to consecutive Big 12 regular season and tournament titles. Under her guidance, Texas Tech advanced to the NCAA postseason 18 times, including the last 16 seasons of her career. She has been named National Coach of the Year by three different organizations and her players have a 99 percent graduation rate. In 2011, Sharp joined Texas Tech as an assistant athletic director. Sharp was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1999 and into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in 2003.
Name:  
Shelby, Carroll
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Auto Racing
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Carroll Shelby was an international motor sports champion as a driver, team manager, and designer/builder. He won 122 events in seven years (1954-1960) as a professional racer. He was also the first-place finisher in the U.S. and Europe 44 times in 1956 when he was named Driver of the Year by Sports Illustrated. In 1959, he won the 24 hours of Le Mans in an Aston Martin. Shelby was also the winner of the U.S. National Road Racing Championship in 1960 before he retired as driver. He designed and constructed the Cobra sports car which won five consecutive U.S. Road Racing titles beginning in 1963. In 1965 it won the world championship, making it the only American-made vehicle ever to win the manufacturers' title for Grand Touring cars. Shelby was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1966.
Name:  
Sherrod, Blackie
City:  
Dallas / Fort Worth
School:  
Sport:  
Media
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Blackie, 85, is one of the most revered names in sports journalism in America, not just in Texas. When you talk about Red Smith, Grantland Rice, Jim Murray and Mickey Herskowitz, you also have to mention Blackie's name. He is a 16-time winner of the Texas Sportswriter of the Year Award, and won the national Red Smith Award for lifetime achievement. Blackie began in newspapers at the Temple Daily Telegram near his native Belton, went to the Fort Worth Press and then the Dallas Times Herald before the Dallas Morning News hired him away from the Herald in 1985. Some suggest that was the key move that allowed the News to survive and the Herald to fold in their bitter cross-town rivalry. At the Fort Worth Press, he hired and helped shape Dan Jenkins, who is also being honored by the Texas Sports Hall of Fame. But Sherrod's skills weren't just in writing. He thought he achieved more satisfaction from editing than writing. Hundreds of thousands of people, if not more, disagree. Sherrod was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2005.
Name:  
Shoemaker, Willie
City:  
Fabens, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Horseracing
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Willie Shoemaker, who began his thoroughbred racing career in 1949, is one of the most successful jockeys of all time. On a yearly average, Shoemaker mounted more than 1,200 thoroughbreds, 300 of which became winners. In his first year, he had 219 victories. Shoemaker won the Kentucky Derby four times. His victories were aboard Swaps in 1955, Tomy Lee in 1959, Lucky Debonair in 1965 and Ferdinand in 1986. Shoemaker also won the Preakness twice with Candy Spots in 1963 and Damascus in 1967. In his 1957 victory in the Belmont Stakes, aboard Gallant Man, he set an American record time of 2:26 3/5 for 1 1/4 miles. Shoemaker also had four other wins in the Belmont Stakes. By the end of his riding career, Shoemaker had won 8,833 races. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1965.
Name:  
Shotwell, P.E.
City:  
Canyon, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
P.E. "Pete" Shotwell was known for his outstanding football coaching career at the high school level. Throughout his 52-year career from 1916-1952 he compiled 262 victories, 90 losses, and 18 ties. He is best remembered for his 1923 team, at Abilene High School, which won all 12 of its games by a combined score of 574-7 and, as a result, won the state football championship. Shotwell also won state championships at Breckenridge in 1929 and Longview in 1937. Shotwell has been honored by the Texas Sports Writers Association, the Texas High School Coaches Association, the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1971.
Name:  
Sikes, J.V.
City:  
Leonard, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
J.V. "Siki" Sikes, an early football standout at Texas A&M, was called "the greatest end in America" by legendary Notre Dame football coach Knute Rockne. Sikes won All-America honors and was one of four Southwest Conference football players who brought collegiate football in Texas into national prominence for the first time. This happened during the East-West Shrine game in San Francisco on Dec. 26, 1927, when Sikes' West team scored a 16-6 upset. In addition to his football accomplishments, Sikes received All-Southwest honors in baseball and captained the Aggies' basketball squad. He also received nine varsity letters divided equally among football, baseball, and basketball. Sikes later had an outstanding coaching career that spanned more than 30 years at Texas A&M, Georgia, Kansas, and East Texas State. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1977.
Name:  
Sims, Billy
City:  
Hooks, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
At Hooks High School (1972-74) Billy Sims rushed around, through and over opposing defenses for 7,733 career yards. He was voted All-State twice and also made the All-Southern and Prep All-America teams as a senior. The 6'0, 205 lb. halfback continued his remarkable career at the University of Oklahoma. He holds the Sooners' record for career rushing yards with 4,118 from 1975-1979. Sims led the Sooners to consecutive victories in the 1979 & 1980 Orange Bowls. In the 1979 rematch with Nebraska Sims scored two touchdowns and had 134 yards rushing in the 31-24 victory. Against Florida State in the 1980 Orange Bowl he gained 164 yards with a touchdown. Sims was a two-time consensus All-American, and won the 1978 Heisman Trophy as a junior. During his Heisman Trophy campaign he led the nation in rushing (1,762 yards) and scoring (20 touchdowns). Sims was the first pick taken in the 1980 NFL draft by the Detroit Lions. He was named 1980 Rookie of the Year and made the All-NFL team three times (1980-1982). Unfortunately Sims' career with the Detroit Lions (1980-1984) was shortened by a severe knee injury in 1984. He had 42 career touchdowns and retired as Detroit's all-time leading rusher with 5,106 yards. He is a member of the Michigan and Oklahoma Sports Halls of Fame and in 1995 he was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Sims owns two barbecue restaurants in Oklahoma and currently works as the Vice President of Expansion and Community Development for Texans Can! Academies in Dallas. Sims is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame's Class of 2006.
Name:  
Singletary, Mike
City:  
Houston, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Mike Singletary was the best linebacker of his era; nobody else played to his level of intensity or production. The Houston Worthing graduate was three-time All-SWC player at Baylor from 1978 to 1980. Singletary was voted Defensive Player of the Year and consensus All-SWC in both his junior and senior years. The Bear's defensive captain of three seasons once made an astonishing 33 tackles in one game against Arkansas. The first-round draft choice was selected, appropriately enough to the Chicago Bears, noted for their fierce middle linebackers. Singletary excelled in the Bear's 46 defense, making 10 consecutive Pro Bowls. He was voted NFL Defensive Player of the Year in 1985 after the Bears won the Super Bowl and was honored as NFL Man of the Year in 1990. He was hired as the San Francisco 49ers head coach after the 2008 season, when he led the team to a 5-4 record as the interim head coach. Singletary compiled an 18-22 record as head coach of the 49ers before he was fired in 2010. In January 2011, he joined the Minnesota Vikings as a linebackers coach. Singletary, who is also a motivational speaker and ordained minister, was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.
Name:  
Slocum, R.C.
City:  
Oakdale, LA
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
During his 14 seasons at Texas A&M (1989-2002) R.C. Slocum became the winningest football coach in school history. The Orange, Texas native had career record of 123-47-2 surpassing the former mark of 82 wins set by Coach Homer Norton. Slocum won four conference championships including the 1998 Big 12 title - a 36-33 victory over top-ranked Kansas State. Under his guidance the Aggies won three consecutive Southwest Conference championships (1991-1993) and did not lose a conference game from 1991-94. His 94 wins during the 1990s were the most by any coach in Texas and nationally ranked behind only Bobby Bowden and Joe Paterno. Slocum holds SWC records for career winning percentage (80%) and consecutive conference victories with 26. He led Texas A&M to 11 Bowl games and never had a losing season. Slocum served as an assistant or head coach for 30 years at Texas A&M. Over 50 of his players have played in the NFL. He is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Class of 2005.
Name:  
Smith, Bubba
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
At 6'7 Charles Aaron "Bubba" Smith was a big man who made a big impact on the football field and later turned to the "big screen" as a second career. Growing up near Beaumont, Smith played football for his father, Willie Ray Smith, Sr., at Charlton-Pollard High School. Smith, Sr. was a head football coach at three Beaumont area high schools. He totaled 235 career victories and coached both of his sons during their high school days. Smith was hoping to play for the University of Texas, but it was before integration. He signed to play at Michigan State University and became a popular athlete, with fans creating the chant ï"Kill, Bubba, kill." Smith played defensive end for the Spartans from 1963-66 and participated in the 10-10 tie with Notre Dame, noted at that time, as "The Game of the Century." Earning All-American honors twice during his time at Michigan State, Smith is one of only three Spartan football players to have his jersey number retired. Smith's final game of his college career took place November 19, 1966 against Notre Dame. Both the Spartans and Fighting Irish were undefeated, untied and ranked No. 1 and No. 2 in the nation. Notre Dame known for their great offense and Michigan State for their great defense, this match up had everything except a winner. Michigan State led in the beginning 10-0, and Notre Dame fought back to tie it 10-10. Notre Dame's Head Coach Ara Parseghian knew running down the clock would keep the Fighting Irish in the running for a national title, so he ran it out with only 1:10 left at Notre Dame 30-yard line. Much controversy took place after the notorious game, and criticism of Coach Parseghian�s decision lingered for years. As stated on ESPN Classic, "When Michigan State and Notre Dame are mentioned in the same breath, everyone thinks of the 1966 game." The Fighting Irish were later noted national champions. Turning professional in 1967, Smith was selected by the Baltimore Colts as the first overall selection in the NFL Draft. Smith was the Colts' starting left defensive end for five seasons and played in two Super Bowls, winning Super Bowl V in 1970. He had excellent speed, was impressively quick for his size, and usually caught a double team from two blockers. Selected as First Team All-Pro in 1971, Smith was traded from the Colts in 1972 He spent two seasons with the Oakland Raiders and two more with the Houston Oilers before a knee injury ended his career in 1976. Smith was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1988. After his football, Smith was recruited to appear in commercials for Miller Lite beer. He and NFL Hall of Fame star Dick Butkus were cast as inept golfers and polo players in the famous TV spots. He later stopped doing the ads because he didn't like the effect drinking had on people and didn't want to be perceived as contributing to it. Smith transitioned to acting in movies and on television, mostly in comedy roles. Smith is best remembered for playing Moses Hightower in six "Police Academy" movies. He also made appearances in several TV series. Smith passed away August 3, 2011 at the age of 66. He is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2011.
Name:  
Smith, Cecil
City:  
Llano County, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Polo
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Although the game of polo was dominated by the affluent crowd, Cecil Smith, a cowboy from Llano County, Texas, went East and took permanent possession of the game. It was his defeat of Tommy Hitchcock in the East-West match in Chicago that brought him national fame. For three decades, he played in every high-goal national and international competition. In 1938, his team, called the Texas Rangers, swept England off its feet by winning every major polo title in the country, including the King's Coronation Cup. From 1938 to 1962, Smith had a 10-goal rating, the highest honor a player can achieve. As a result of his amazing victories, Smith became known as the king of "The Sport of Kings". He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1956.
Name:  
Smith, Dean
City:  
Graham, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field, Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
As a sprinter at the University of Texas from 1952-1954, Dean Smith won seven Southwest Conference track championships. He won conference titles in the 100 and 220 and also ran on three winning 440- yard relay teams. Smith was also a halfback on the Longhorns' 1952 SWC championship football team. He won an Olympic gold medal as the first leg of the 440-yard relay team at the 1952 Olympic Games. Ironically, he is best remembered for being victimized in the controversial 100 yard dash at Helsinki. The first four runners were timed in 10.4 seconds in a photo finish, but the judges ruled Smith fourth after a long delay. Smith's athletic skills later enabled him to become one of the leading stuntmen and supporting actors in movies and television. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1985.
Name:  
Smith, Emmitt
City:  
Pensacola, FL
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Smith is the NFL's all-time leading rusher with 18,355 yards. The historic carry came versus the Seattle Seahawks on October 27, 2002. During his stellar career as a running back for the Dallas Cowboys (1990-2002) Smith scored 164 career touchdowns and won four NFL rushing titles. He is the first player in NFL history to rush for over 1,000 yards in 11 consecutive seasons and was selected to play in eight Pro Bowls. Smith led the Cowboys to three Super Bowl victories after the 1992, 1993 & 1995 seasons. In 1993 Smith rushed for 1,486 yards and achieved the rare honor of being named league and Super Bowl MVP in the same season. In 1995 he set the NFL record for touchdowns in a season with 25. Smith joined the prestigious Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor in 2005. He is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Class of 2005.
Name:  
Smith, Jim Ray
City:  
West Columbia, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Jim Ray Smith began his football career as a four sport star at West Columbia High School in Texas. Smith was a two-time All-SWC and All-America guard at Baylor in 1953 & 1954. After his collegiate career, he was selected to play in the prestigious College All-Star Game in 1955. Smith helped the College All-Stars in a rare 30-27 victory over the defending NFL champions, and his future team, the Cleveland Browns. Smith then continued paving the way for running backs as a guard for the Cleveland Browns from 1956-62. The Browns led the league in rushing in 1958 & 1959. During his illustrious career Smith was selected to five Pro Bowls and ended his career with the Dallas Cowboys from 1962-1964. He joined the College Football Hall of Fame in 1986. Smith is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2007. PHOTO COURTESY OF BAYLOR UNIVERSITY
Name:  
Smith, Lovie
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Head Coach Lovie Lee Smith enters his 8th season as Head Coach of the Chicago Bears. Voted NFL's Coach of the Year in 2005, Smith led his team to a division title in only his second season with Chicago. He's travelled the road to the Super Bowl twice in his career, once as the defensive coordinator for the St. Louis Rams in 2001 and in 2006 as head coach for the Chicago Bears. Born in Gladewater, Smith played football at Big Sandy High School, earning All-State honors three consecutive years as defensive end/linebacker. From 1973-75 the Big Sandy football team won three straight state championships. In 1974, he played in a 0-0 tie against fellow Class of 2011 inductee G.A. Moore's Celina team. The 1975 season marked a milestone year for Big Sandy, dominating with one of the most impressive seasons in Texas high school football history. The offense scored 824 points, setting a national record at the time. The defense allowed only 15 points scored for the entire season. An amazing number. Smith earned his college diploma at the University of Tulsa where he was a two-time All-American linebacker and safety. Upon graduation, he began his coaching career, which started back home in Big Sandy as defensive coordinator in 1980. He stayed home one year and then left to coach at Cascia Hall Preparatory School in Tulsa. He soon jumped to the collegiate level, coaching for various teams, including: University of Tulsa (1983-86), University of Wisconsin-Madison (1987), Arizona State University (1988-91), and the University of Kentucky (1992), the University of Tennessee (1993-94) and Ohio State University (1995). In 1996, Smith began his NFL career, starting with Tampa Bay as a linebackers coach. After five seasons with the Buccaneers, and assisting head coach Tony Dungy in developing the "Tampa Defense", Smith became defensive coordinator for the St. Louis Rams. Smith improved the Rams defense from giving up 29.4 points per game to 17.1 points in just one season. Smith became head coach for Chicago on January 15, 2004. Upon beginning his duties as head coach, Smith stated three main goals for the Bears - - end the decade of dominance by the Green Bay Packers over the Bears, capture the NFC North Division and win the Super Bowl. After a rough start in 2004, Smith made improvements for the 2005 season and was named by the Associated Press as NFL Coach of the Year. In 2005, Smith led the Bears to a 27-24 victory in the Divisional Playoffs against the Seattle Seahawks. Advancing to the NFC Championship, "da Bears" defeated the New Orleans Saints 39-14. He led Chicago to division titles in 2005 and 2006, becoming one of only two coaches in team history to lead the Bears to consecutive division titles. He reached a career high of 13 wins in 2006, winning the first seven games of the season. In 2006 Smith became the first African American coach to lead a team to the Super Bowl - - doing so with close friend Tony Dungy, who was head coach for the Indianapolis Colts. Smith now has over 27 years of coaching experience at the collegiate and professional levels and continues to lead the Chicago Bears. He is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2011.
Name:  
Smith, Milburn
City:  
Mount Vernon
School:  
Sport:  
Football & Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
At every school he served as coach, Milburn "Catfish" Smith transformed his teams into winners. As a basketball coach at Carey High School, Smith took his team to the state championship in his second year (1937). After World War II, Smith coached football and basketball at Mount Vernon High School. His football teams went 60-5-1 and won six consecutive district titles. His basketball teams won 163 games against 17 defeats. He later served as head football coach at East Texas State for three years and had a 29 game winning streak. In 1958, his last season at East Texas, he was named College Coach of the Year by the Texas Sports Writers Association. He later became the freshmen football coach at Baylor University and was eventually appointed Baylor's athletics promotion director and executive director of the Baylor Bear Club. Smith was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1979.
Name:  
Southern, Eddie
City:  
Dallas
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Eddie Southern was one of the few track stars in the world who excelled in many different racing events. At the University of Texas, Southern was a member of an 880-yard relay team that set a word record at the 1957 Texas Relays. As the anchor of the mile relay team at the Kansas relays in 1958, Southern became the first person to run the quarter mile in under 45 seconds. Southern also anchored the 440-yard relay team that set two world records in four years. Ironically, the race he prized the most, the Olympic 400-yard hurdles, was the only big race he lost. A teammate beat Southern with a 50.1-second run that tied the Olympic record Southern had set in the semi- finals. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1969.
Name:  
Speaker, Tris
City:  
Hubbard, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Tris Speaker left Hubbard, Texas to become one of the early stars of a major-league baseball with the Cleveland Indians. He spent 22 years in the major leagues with the Boston Red Sox (1907-1915), Cleveland Indians (1916-1926), Washington Senators (1927) and Philadelphia Athletics (1928). In 1920 Speaker was the player/manager for the Indians and led the team to a World Series victory over the Brooklyn Dodgers. Speaker was a fine defensive player who was known for playing an extremely shallow center field. His lifetime batting average of .345 ranks fifth highest in history. Speaker is the major league's all-time leader with 792 doubles and ranks in the top ten for runs, (1,882), triples (223), and hits (3,514). In 1912, he hit .383 and was named the American League's Most Valuable Player. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1937. On January 11, 1951, Speaker became the first person elected to the Texas Sports Hall of Fame.
Name:  
St. Clair, James
City:  
Decatur, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
James St. Clair began his coaching career in 1915 at North Texas State. In 1924, he moved to Southern Methodist University as director of physical education. He was also head basketball coach for 13 seasons (1925-1937) and led the Mustangs to their first Southwest Conference title in 1935 and their first undisputed championship two years later. After retiring as coach, St. Clair became executive secretary of the Southwest Conference in 1938. His systematic approach to rules and officiating led to his appointment as chairman of the NCAA Basketball Rules Committee. St. Clair was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1983.
Name:  
Stafford, Harrison
City:  
Wharton, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Legend has it that University of Texas football coach Clyde Littlefield first heard of Stafford when assistant Shorty Alderson announced "Clyde, I found you the darndest football player you ever saw. He tore up a couple of dummies and hurt a couple of men. He says his name is Harrison Stafford." Stafford, a native of Wharton, would soon acquaint himself with the rest of the SWC in 1930: the first of three consecutive All-SWC seasons for the 6'0,185 pound halfback. Former Texas Longhorn teammate Wilson "Bull" Elkins recalled, "Harrison was the only person I ever saw who hurt himself blocking. He blocked with his head a great deal, but he had absolutely perfect timing. He was the best blocker I've ever seen." Stafford, along with "Bull" Elkins, Ernie Koy and Dexter Shelley, led the Longhorns to an 8-1 record and the 1930 SWC Championship. In 1969 Stafford was elected to the All-Time Southwest Conference Team. He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame (1975) and was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1976.
Name:  
Stallings, Gene
City:  
Paris, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Gene Stallings was one of two Paris High School left ends who would greatly impact football - the other was Raymond Berry. Stallings, a sophomore survivor of Bear Bryant's Aggie training camp at Junction in 1954, was a senior captain of the 1956 unbeaten, once tied Aggies. His first coaching assignment was as a student assistant, followed by seven seasons with Bryant at Alabama. Stallings returned to A&M to serve as head coach for seven years (1965-1971) highlighted by the 1967 SWC title and Cotton Bowl win over Bryant at Alabama. He began his pro career in 1972, serving 14 years on Tom Landry's staff with the Dallas Cowboys (1972-1985) and four years as head coach of the St. Louis/Arizona Cardinals (1986-1989). Stallings went back to Tuscaloosa in 1990 and promptly returned the Crimson Tide to prominence. After a 7-5 start, his Alabama teams went 11-1-0, 13-0-0, 8-3-1, & 12-1-0 with three top five rankings. His 1992 team won the National Championship with a 34-13 victory over Miami in the Sugar Bowl. Stallings was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1996.
Name:  
Staubach, Roger
City:  
Cincinatti, Ohio
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Ohio native Roger Staubach had a hall of fame career as quarterback of the Dallas Cowboys from 1969-1979. Staubach first gained national attention as an All-American and Heisman Trophy (1963) winning quarterback at the Navel Academy. During his stellar NFL career he passed for 22,700 yards with 153 TD passes and rushed for 2,264 yards and 20 TDs. Four times he led the NFL in passing and was voted All-NFC. He guided his teams to four NFC Championships and victories in Super Bowls VI and XII. Staubach was also selected as the MVP of Super Bowl VI. "Captain Comeback" led the Cowboys to 23 come from behind victories during his career. He is a member of the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor (1983) Texas Sports Hall of Fame (1983) and the Pro Football Hall of Fame (1985).
Name:  
Steinke, Gil
City:  
Ganado, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Gil Steinke began his football career as a player at Texas A&I, where he won all-conference honors on offense and defense. Steinke played with the Philadelphia Eagles from 1945-1948 and led the NFL in punt returns with a 14.8 average in 1947. As a starting safety, he helped the Eagles win a world title in 1948. He continued his career in football as a coach at Texas A&I from 1954-1976. He directed the Javelinas to 39 consecutive triumphs and six NAIA football titles, including three in a row from 1974-1976. By the end of his 23-year coaching career at A&I, he had achieved 10 Lone Star Conference championship trophies and 186 wins against only 62 losses and 4 ties. Steinke was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1977.
Name:  
Stewart, Payne
City:  
Springfield, MO
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Payne Stewart, an All-American golfer at SMU, was the SWC individual co-champion along with Houston's Fred Couples in 1979. Stewart won 11 times on the PGA Tour and also had 7 international victories. Three of those victories were majors - the PGA Championship in 1989 and the U.S. Open in 1991 and 1999. Stewart, who was easily identified on the tour wearing his trademark knickers, played some of his best golf in Texas winning the 1995 Shell Houston Open and the 1990 GTE Byron Nelson Classic. He also played on 5 U.S. Ryder Cup Teams (1987, 1989,1991, 1993 and 1999). Tragically, he was killed in a plane crash in 1999. Stewart was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2000.
Name:  
Stratton, Monty
City:  
Wagner, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Monty Stratton was a promising young major-league pitcher with the Chicago White Sox (1934-1938) who had to have his leg amputated in a tragic hunting accident. In 1937 he posted a 15-5 record with a 2.40 ERA and was selected to play in the All-Star Game. He also had a 15-9 record in 1938. After his hunting accident on November 27, 1938 he was determined to resume his baseball-playing career, the Wagner native (seven miles northwest of Greenville) practiced pitching with the help of his wife, who served as his catcher. Since he was a righthander, he could not push off the mound with his artificial leg because of balance problems, so he had to develop a new motion. It was this new motion that enabled him to pitch for Sherman in the East Texas League and post an 18-8 record in 1946. Jimmy Stewart portrayed Stratton in the 1948 film The Stratton Story. The movie won an Academy Award for best original screenplay. Stratton was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1961.
Name:  
Street, James
City:  
Longview, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Street a native of Longview, Texas, played quarterback in 1966 Oil Bowl and the Big 33 All-Star Game. In the Big 33 game against the Pennsylvania All-Stars Street threw two TD passes in a 34-2 Texas win. At the University of Texas, Street became the first quarterback in history to run the Wishbone Offense. From 1968 to 1969 this All-SWC quarterback was undefeated as a starter at Texas. Street capped his stellar career by leading the Longhorns to the 1969 National Championship with a 15-14 win over Arkansas in what became known as "The Big Shootout". He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2000.
Name:  
Sundberg, Jim
City:  
Galesburg, IL
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Jim Sundberg one of the best defensive catchers of his era is from Galesburg, Ill. He played catcher for the Texas Rangers from 1974-1983 and 1988-1989. He was the first Ranger to play in more than 1,500 games. Sundberg, an outstanding catcher, won six consecutive Gold Glove awards from 1976-1981. He was a two-time All-Star for the Rangers in 1974 and 1978. Sundberg played in 1,512 games for Rangers, 4,684 at bats, 482 runs, 1,180 hits, 542 walks. Sundberg also played for the Milwaukee Brewers (1984), Kansas City Royals (1985-1986) where he won the World Series, and Chicago Cubs (1987-1988). He currently serves as the Senior Executive Vice President for the Texas Rangers. Sundberg was inducted into the hall of fame as part of the class of 2010.
Name:  
Swink, Jim
City:  
Rusk
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Jim Swink was one of the greatest ball carriers in the history of Southwest Conference football. As a junior at TCU in 1955 he was a consensus All-American, led the nation in scoring (125 points), was second in rushing yards (1,283) and finished 2nd in the Heisman Trophy voting. After Swink led TCU to the 1956 and 1957 Cotton Bowls his coach Abe Martin described him as “…a little ol’ rubber-legged outfit nobody can tackle.” The two-time Academic All-American turned down the NFL and enrolled at Southwest Medical Center in Dallas. In 1960 he played briefly with the AFL’s Dallas Texans before retiring from professional football. Swink, who later became an orthopedic surgeon in Fort Worth once said, “I’d rather be a good family doctor than the greatest football player in the world.” He served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War from 1966-1968 with the 12th Evacuation Hospital. Swink was awarded a Purple Heart, Air Medal and the Bronze Star. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1980 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1977.
Name:  
Swoopes, Sheryl
City:  
Brownfield, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Sheryl Swoopes, of Brownfield, Texas, won championships on the high school, college, Olympic and professional levels. At Brownfield, she led her team to the 1988 Class 3A State Championship with a 49-40 victory against Hardin-Jefferson. At Texas, Tech Swoopes led the Lady Raiders to the 1993 national championship with an 84-82 win against Ohio State. She was named the Final Four's MVP after setting the championship-game scoring record with 47 points. She was a member of the 1996 and 2000 U.S. Women's Olympic gold medal-winning basketball teams. In 1995, she became the first woman to have a basketball shoe named after her when the Air Swoopes was introduced by Nike. The first player ever selected by the WNBA, Swoopes was named league MVP and Defensive Player of the Year for the WNBA's Houston Comets in 2000. A three-time WNBA MVP, Swoopes and the Comets won the WNBA's first four championships from 1997 to 2000. Swoopes also spent time playing with the Seattle Storm and the Tulsa Shock (where she played after coming out of retirement in 2011) of the WNBA, as well as overseas in Russia, Italy and Greece. She was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.
Name:  
Taylor, Charley
City:  
Grand Prairie, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Charley Taylor, who was All-State in three sports at Grand Prairie's Dalworth High School and later an All-American at Arizona State, became the No. 1 pass receiver in pro football history. He surpassed fellow Texans Don Maynard and Raymond Berry with his record of 649 receptions while playing with the Washington Redskins from 1964-1977. He was the Redskins' first draft choice and was the NFL Rookie of the Year in 1964 with 755 rushing and 814 receiving yards. He earned All-NFL honors four times and appeared in eight Pro Bowls. He also led the league in receiving twice and placed second in two other seasons. He topped 10,000 career yards with 9,110 on 649 catches and 1,488 on 442 rushes while scoring 90 touchdowns. Taylor was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1984.
Name:  
Teaff, Grant
City:  
Synder, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
When Grant Teaff stepped down as head football coach at Baylor University at the end of the 1992 season, he ranked second in Southwest Conference history in seasons (21) and games (239) coached at one school. His 128 victories were fifth all-time, proof of his ability to sustain a winning program at a smaller private university. Teaff guided the Bears to two SWC titles and eight bowl games including the two Cotton Bowl appearances (1975, 1981). The celebrated "Miracle on the Brazos" in 1974 was the Bear's first conference title in 50 years. Teaff earlier had served as head coach at McMurry and Angelo State. The former Snyder High School and McMurry athlete chaired for 11 years the ethics committee of the American Football Coaches Association. He resigned as athletic director at Baylor to become executive director of the 6,500-member American Football Coaches Association in 1994. Teaff was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.
Name:  
Thomas, Emmitt
City:  
Angleton
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Emmitt Thomas is an Angleton, Texas native. Thomas played 13 seasons at cornerback for the Kansas City Chiefs from 1966 to 1978. While with the Chiefs he led the league in interceptions twice, in the AFL in 1969 and in the NFL in 1974. The 6'2, 192 pound cornerback set a Chiefs team record with 12 picks in 1974 and he is the Chiefs all-time leader in interceptions with 58. Thomas was selected to four Pro Bowls and made one AFL All-Star team. He played at Bishop College in Dallas. Thomas is entering his 31st season in the NFL coaching ranks and is currently the defensive backs coach for the Kansas City Chiefs. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2008. Thomas was inducted into the hall of fame as part of the class of 2010.
Name:  
Thomas, Thurman
City:  
Houston, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2014
As a running back for Willowridge High School in Sugar Land, Texas, in 1982, Thurman Thomas had 1,556 yards and helped lead his team to the 4A state championship with a 15-0 record. At Oklahoma State University he twice made the All-America team (1985, 1987) and had 21 games of 100 yards rushing or more. His staggering career numbers include 897 rushes for 4,595 yards, 43 touchdowns, and 5,146 total yards. Thomas left OSU as the school’s all-time leading rusher and his 34 jersey is one of only three to have been retired by the school. After being drafted by the Buffalo Bills (1988-1999) he soon led the team to four straight Super Bowls in 1991, 1992, 1993, and 1994. Thomas was named to five consecutive Pro Bowls (1989-93), was the 1991 NFL MVP, and in 13 NFL seasons (including Miami in 2000), he had 12,074 rushing yards, 472 receptions for 4,458 receiving yards, and 88 touchdowns with 16,532 total yards from scrimmage. He was inducted into the Professional Football Hall of Fame in 2007, the College Football Hall of Fame in 2008 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2014.
Name:  
Thompson, Jerry
City:  
Dallas, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Jerry Thompson's success as a track star began at Woodrow Wilson High School in Dallas and continued through college. At Wilson, he won the state mile run in 1941. While attending the University of Texas, he was the 1947 and 1948 Southwest Conference champion in the 800 yard dash, the mile, and the two-mile. In 1943 he was the NCAA two-mile champion and was selected as the outstanding athlete at the Texas and Drake Relays in 1947. Thompson, a three-time All-America in the two-mile, was a member of the 1948 U.S. Olympic team in the 5,000 meter event. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1976.
Name:  
Tips, Kern
City:  
Houston
School:  
Sport:  
Media
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
No one was more associated with Southwest Conference football than Kern, who is mainly known for broadcasting SWC football games for 32 years on the Humble Football Network. He had a way with words that few disliked. When TCU and Arkansas played football against each other, it wasn't an Arkansas-TCU tilt, is was the Hoggies against the Froggies. When UT running back Christ Gilbert scored a touchdown, it wasn't six points, it was Gilbert dancing into Royal soil. When Arkansas' Danny Brabham scored, he spilled over the lip of the cup. And a PAT attempt would be little Johnny trying to make sevens out of sixes. He had a way with the English language that would fire up the imagination. Kern was born in 1904 in Houston, and was educated at Texas A&M and Rice. He was a Houston Chronicle sports writer from 1924-26, and was sports editor from 1926-34. He was general manager of Houston radio station KPRC from 1935-46. He later worked for an advertising agency. Kern received the only award ever made by the Southwest Football Officials Association for distinguished service to the sport, and was voted Texas Sportscaster of the Year in a national poll for five consecutive years. He passed away in 1967. Tips was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2005.
Name:  
Tittle, Y.A.
City:  
Marshall, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Y.A. Tittle played tailback for Marshall High School and went on to play quarterback for Louisiana State University (1944-1947). Tittle was second team All-Southeast Conference in 1946 and 1947. Tittle's pro football career spanned 17 seasons (1948-1964) and 201 games in which he passed for 33,070 yards and threw 242 touchdowns. He played three seasons with the Baltimore Colts, ten seasons with the San Francisco 49ers, and four seasons with the New York Giants, who he led to three consecutive division titles. He was voted the league's Most Valuable Player twice, was All-NFL with six Pro Bowls, and set five NFL records by the time he retired in 1964. Tittle was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1987.
Name:  
Todd, Dick
City:  
Crowell, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dick Todd's football career began at Crowell High School (1931-1934), where he scored a national record of 318 points during his senior year in 1934. By the time he graduated, he had accumulated an amazing 664 points. He continued playing football at Texas A&M under Homer Norton, who felt the only broken-field runner comparable to Todd was Red Grange or Jim Thorpe. After graduating in 1938, he was drafted by the Washington Redskins and played with them for 10 years (1939-1942, 1945-1948). His pro career was interrupted by military service during which time he was named to the All-Service team in 1943 while playing with Iowa Pre-Flight. In 1951 Todd served as head coach for the Redskins. Todd was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1968.
Name:  
Toepperwein, Ad
City:  
San Antonio, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Marksmanship
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Ad Toepperwein was the greatest marksman and trick shot gunman of his time. He set 14 world records during the 36 years that he toured the nation for the Winchester Arms Co. His most-publicized feat was a marathon exhibition held at the San Antonio Exposition and Fair Grounds in December, 1907. Using a .22-caliber automatic rifle, he fired at 72,500 wooden blocks over a 10-day period. Each block measured 2 1/2 inches in diameter and was hand-thrown into the air. In 10 days of shooting, about eight hours a day, he missed only nine times. Toepperwein also taught his wife Elizabeth to shoot. Elizabeth was the first woman to qualify as a National Marksman with the military rifle. Winshcester promoted the Topperweins as the "World's Greatest Shooting Team". As they toured the nation together, they set 26 world shooting records. Toepperwein was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1966.
Name:  
Tomjanovich, Rudy
City:  
Hamtramck, MI
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Rudy Tomjanovich was a member of the Houston Rockets franchise for over 33 seasons as a player (1970-1981), advance scout, assistant and head coach (1991-2003). A five-time NBA All-Star, he retired as the Rockets all-time leader in rebounds and finished second on the career scoring list. "Rudy T" coached Houston to consecutive NBA titles in 1994 and 1995. The Rockets became the first pro team from Texas to win an NBA title and only the fifth NBA franchise in history to repeat as champions. Tomjanovich is the winningest coach in Rockets history with a career record of 509-397 and a 51-39 record in the playoffs. He was named Sporting News NBA Coach of the Year in 1992-93 and was selected to coach the 1997 Western Conference All-Star Team. Internationally, he coached the United States to a Gold Medal at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney and a Bronze Medal at the 1998 World Championships. On January 28, 1982 Tomjanovich's number 45 jersey became the first ever to be retired by the Rockets franchise. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2003.
Name:  
Tomlinson, LaDainian
City:  
Waco
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
LaDainian Tomlinson burst onto the football scene when he set Waco's single-season city rushing record with 2,554 yards in 1996 at University High School. At TCU, he added to his record-breaking resume by leading the nation in rushing his junior and senior seasons. In 1999, he set the NCAA single-game rushing record with 406 yards against UTEP. In 11 seasons with the San Diego Chargers (2001-2009) and New York Jets (2010-11), "LT" has 13,684 career rushing yards and 145 rushing touchdowns, 4,772 receiving yards and 17 career touchdown catches. LT is tied for 4th on the NFL's all time list for consecutive 1,000 yard seasons (eight, from 2001-2008). He was named the NFL's MVP in 2006, the first in Charger's history. That season he led the league in rushing with 1,815 yards and set NFL records with 31 total touchdowns and 28 rushing touchdowns. LT's 2,323 total yards in 2006 was the sixth-most in NFL history. He has been selected to play in five Pro Bowls, was named to the All-Pro team four times, and was named the NFL's Walter Payton Man of the Year in 2006 for his work with the Tomlinson Touching Lives Foundation. He was also named to the NFL's 2000s All-Decade Team and the San Diego Chargers' 50th Anniversary Team. His 13,684 career rushing yards place him fifth all-time in the NFL, the highest ranking by an active player. Tomlinson was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2008.
Name:  
Trevino, Lee
City:  
Dallas, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Lee Trevino was a caddie, driving-range handyman and municipal golf course "hustler" before he turned to professional golf. Once on the tour, he quickly established himself with a victory at the 1968 U.S. Open at Oak Hill Country Club in Rochester, New York. He won his second U.S. Open in 1971 at the Merion Golf Club's East Course in Ardmore, Pennsylvania. Trevino also has two British Open titles (1971, 1972) to go along with his 27 PGA Tour victories. A major back problem slowed him down from 1975 to 1977, but he regained his prominence by winning the 1984 PGA, his sixth major title. Since he turned 50 in 1989, Trevino has 41 Champions Tour victories including the 1990 U.S. Senior Open. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1974.
Name:  
Trull, Don
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2014
Baylor quarterback Don Trull led the Bears to lofty heights in the early 1960’s, becoming one of the greatest passing threats in Southwest Conference history. From 1961 to 1963 he amassed 4,143 career passing yards and 27 touchdowns. Running Coach John Bridgers’ offense to perfection, Trull led the nation in passing in 1962 & 1963. His many honors in 1963 included being named to the All-America team, winning the Houston Post SWC MVP award and making the All-SWC team. Trull twice guided the Bears to bowl victories including a 24-9 victory over Utah State in the 1961 Gotham Bowl and a 14-7 win over LSU in 1963 Bluebonnet Bowl. Also an excellent student, Trull became Baylor’s first NFF National Scholar Athlete, made the dean’s list three times and won the 1963 Earl Blaik Fellowship Award. He went on to have a successful professional football career with the Houston Oilers (1964-1969), Boston Patriots (1967), Canadian Football League’s Edmonton Eskimos (1970-1971), World Football League’s Houston Texans (1974) & Shreveport Steamer (1975). He was inducted into the Baylor Athletic Hall of Fame in 1975, the College Football Hall of Fame in 2013 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2014.
Name:  
Turner, Clyde
City:  
Sweetwater, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Although Clyde Turner could not break into the starting lineup at Sweetwater High School, he later proved himself as a great player. It was at Hardin-Simmons University that Turner developed the talents that earned him the nickname "Bulldog". As a small-college All-America selection, he outplayed college football's greatest centers in the summer of 1940 to become the starter in the annual College All-Star game against the NFL champions at Chicago's Soldier Field. Turner was a first-round draft choice of the Chicago Bears. In 1942, he led the league with the interceptions. In his 12-year pro career (1940-1952) with the Bears, he was named All-Pro six times and played on four championship teams. Turner was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1961.
Name:  
Tyson, Paul
City:  
Hope, Arkansas
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
During the 1920's Paul Tyson was known as the greatest high school football coach in the country. Beginning in 1913, Tyson coached Waco High School for 27 seasons during which the Tigers had a 205-42-16 record and outscored their opponents by an average of 31-4. His 1921 team was one of the finest in Texas history scoring 526 points and allowing 0. Tyson attended football clinics across the nation and perfected a spinner play which high school defenses found hard to stop. Waco won state championships in 1922, 1925, 1926 and 1927. Tyson's 1927 squad defeated Latin High School of Cleveland, Ohio 44-12 to win the mythical national high school football championship. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1977.
Name:  
Upshaw, Gene
City:  
Robstown, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Robstown, Texas, native Gene Upshaw played tackle, center and end for coaching legend Gil Steinke at Texas A&I. An All-America selection in 1966, he became the first round draft pick of the Oakland Raiders. From 1967-1981 Upshaw played on Raiders teams that made 11 playoff appearances, won eight division titles, one AFL Championship, two AFC titles and two World Championships in Super Bowls XI and XV. The 6',5 255 lb. left guard was known for his lead blocks on sweeps around the Raider's left end. He was an eight time All-Pro who played in six NFL Pro Bowls and one AFL All-Star Game. Upshaw also holds Raider records for most games played (217) and most playoff starts and appearances (24). He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2000.
Name:  
Utay, Joe
City:  
St. Louis, MO
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Joe Utay is recognized as a pioneer of football in the Southwest. As a halfback at Texas A&M from 1905-1907, he helped lead the Aggies to early records of 7-2-0 and 6-1-1. Then, as Texas A&M's athletic director, Utay became a leading figure in elevating the Cotton Bowl to national prominence. In 1937, J. Curtis Sanford started the Cotton Bowl but was unable to prevent the SWC champion from playing in other bowls. In 1940, Utay helped organize the Cotton Bowl Athletic Association which started the tradition of the Southwest Conference champion appearing in the Cotton Bowl. Utay was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1984.
Name:  
Vaught, Johnny
City:  
Olney, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Johnny Vaught first gained attention as a guard for Texas Christian University from 1930-1932. He was captain of the Horned Frogs' 1932 conference champions, a consensus All-America guard, and twice All-Southwest Conference. As impressive as his playing career was, it was his 25-season tenure as head coach at the University of Mississippi that brought him greater fame. Eighteen of his teams went to bowl games, 10 of them were rated in the nation's Top 10, and four of them were among the Top Five. Upon retiring after his 24th season in 1970, he had achieved the nation's best winning percentage (.749) out of the coaches who had served as many or more seasons. His record was 185-58-12. In 1973, Vaught was asked to come back as head football coach and director of athletics at the University of Mississippi. He finished the 1973 season as coach and retired as director of athletics in 1978. Vaught was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1975.
Name:  
Vincent, Al
City:  
Joaquin, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Though he was a player for 21 years and a coach in the major leagues for 12 years, Al Vincent is best remembered for his 12-year career as a manager in the Texas League. For five years as a Texas League manager (1946 to 1950), he led his teams (Dallas, Tulsa) to the playoffs. Each team (Dallas in 1946, Tulsa in 1949) won titles, and Dallas captured the Dixie Series crown. He managed 34 players who went on to the major leagues, including such stars as Schoolboy Rowe, Dizzy Trout, Hal Newhouser and Virgil Trucks. During his 12 seasons in the major leagues, Vincent coached at Detroit Tigers(1943-1944), Baltimore Orioles (1955-1959), Philadelphia Phillies (1961-1963) and Kansas City Athletics(1966-1967). He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1979.
Name:  
Wagstaff, Floyd
City:  
Shelby County, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball & Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
In his 30 years as a basketball coach at Tyler Junior College (1946-1975), Floyd Wagstaff had a 743-225 record and won 10 conference titles. Wagstaff took his teams to the national tournament 11 times in Hutchinson, Kansas winning national championships in 1949 and 1951. He also doubled as head football coach for 16 of his 30 years at Tyler. His football record included 130 victories against only 36 losses and two trips to the Junior Rose Bowl. Wagstaff was recognized by Tyler Junior College Board of Trustees in 1973 when they named the new basketball gym after him. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1979.
Name:  
Walker, Doak
City:  
Dallas, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Famed sportswriter Grantland Rice once called Doak Walker the most authentic all-around player in football history. Walker was a three-time consensus All-America running back at SMU from 1947-1949. He led the Mustangs to Southwest Conference Championships in 1947 and 1948. A versatile athlete who excelled at a number of positions, he was only a junior when he was awarded the Heisman Trophy in 1948 as college football's best player. His NFL resume includes six seasons with the Detroit Lions from 1950-1955, 2 World Championships (1952, 1953), four All-Pro Awards, and Rookie of the Year honors in 1950 after he led the league in scoring. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1959.
Name:  
Wallace, Bill
City:  
Eagle Lake, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Bill Wallace of Eagle Lake, Texas gained fame at Rice Institute as a triple-threat back who could carry, pass, and punt the football. TCU quarterback Sammy Baugh once said that "Bill Wallace was the greatest back I ever played against" During Wallace's junior year in 1934, he earned All-America honors and led Rice to its first Southwest Conference championship. During his career at Rice he made the All-SWC team twice. In 1936 he was selected to play in the East-West Shrine Game and the Hula Bowl. Wallace was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1978.
Name:  
Walls, Everson
City:  
Richardson, TX
School:  
Grambling State University
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2015
Richardson native, Everson Walls began his illustrious career as a standout at Berkner High School where he soon caught the attention of Grambling State and its legendary coach Eddie Robinson. Walls, who played numerous positions at Grambling, was selected to the Kodak 1AA All-American team, the Black College All-American team and as a senior, led the nation in interceptions. An undrafted free-agent, the 6'1", 190lb Walls quickly found a home at defensive back with the Dallas Cowboys. He led the NFL in interceptions a record three times with Dallas, including club-record 11 as rookie in 1981. Walls, a four-time Pro Bowl (1981, 1982, 1983 & 1985) and three-time All-Pro selection, led the Cowboys in interceptions 5 times, a club record. He is currently tied for 13th on NFL's career interception list with 57 (1981-1993). Walls won his only Super Bowl ring in 1991, when his touchdown-saving tackle on Thurman Thomas helped the New York Giants hold off the Buffalo Bills, 20-19. He also was the Giants team leader in interceptions during the 1990 and 1991 seasons. He is a member of the Dallas Cowboys 25th Anniversary Team and was named the Cowboys’ Man of the Year in 1987. Walls was also named to the All-Time Cowboy’s Team,  the NFL’s All Decade Team for the 1980’s, and was elected to the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame in 1998. A Gift for Ron: Friendship and Sacrifice On and Off the Gridiron was written in 2009 and chronicles the story of Walls’ kidney donation to former Dallas Cowboy teammate Ron Springs.
Name:  
Ware, Andre
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Andre Ware - - Heisman Trophy winner. It's the most prestigious award given in college football. Raised outside of Houston in the coastal lowlands of Texas, Ware played quarterback for the Dickinson High School. "I knew from the age of 11 that football would be the ticket for me to earn a college degree," Ware told the New York Times in an interview years ago. College recruiters were impressed with his athleticism and speed. While getting offers from several Texas schools to play something other than quarterback, Ware's mother encouraged him to stick with the recruiting process until he found exactly what he was looking for. In 1987, he joined the football team at the University of Houston. He blossomed during the "88 season, passing for 25 touchdowns to set a Southwest Conference record and throwing only eight interceptions. Houston ran the high-pressure "run and shoot" offense, which consisted of receiver motion emphasis and receiver adjustments to routes in response to different defenses. Ware threw for 24 touchdowns in his first four games of the 1989 season, Writers and broadcasters began took notice and began to pay attention. Against Baylor, noted for its strong pass defense, Ware threw for 514 yards. The Houston athletic department began to send out weekly "Air Ware" pamphlets to the press. Ware didn't slow down that season. Against Texas Tech he completed 37 passes for 475 yards. Against an over matched SMU, he threw for 517 yards in only 12 minutes of what became a 95-21 victory for Houston. Ware finished his college career with 4,699 yards, 44 touchdowns, and set 26 NCAA records. The U of H also set the record for average points per game with 53.5. Ware was the first African American quarterback to win the Heisman Trophy (1989) He also was named winner of the Davey O'Brien Award, given to the most outstanding quarterback of the year. Leading the Cougars to a No. 14 ranking in the nation his junior year, Ware entered the NFL draft and gave up his senior year. He was a first-round pick by the Detroit Lions, where he teamed up with the previous Heisman Trophy winner from 1988, running back Barry Sanders. He spent four seasons with the Lions, starting six games and playing 14. Ware began the 1994 season with the Los Angeles Raiders and tried to catch on with the Jacksonville Jaguars in 1995. Ware joined the Canadian Football League in 1995 and played for various teams including: the Ottawa Rough Riders, BC Lions and Toronto Argonauts. He also played for Berlin Thunder in 1999, a German NFL Europe team. After his playing career ended, Ware went into broadcasting. He has teamed up with Dave Pasch and Gary Thorne, for college football games on ESPN, ESPN 2 and ESPN on ABC. In July of 2009 he partnered with Dave Neal, long-time SEC broadcaster, for ESPN Regional Television's coverage of Southeastern Conference Football. Today Ware is part of the radio broadcast team for the Houston Texans. Ware was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2004. His exploits on the field in Houston are one of college football's spectacular success stories, and Ware has remained a well-loved figure in the Houston area. He is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2011.
Name:  
Wariner, Jeremy
City:  
Arlington, Texas
School:  
Baylor University
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Class of 2015
Jeremy Wariner of Arlington was a three-time Olympic gold medalist and five-time world champion in the 400 meters and 4x400 relay, and was ranked No. 1 in the world at the distance for five years (2004-07, 2010), a mark surpassed only by fellow Baylor alum and 1997 TSHOF inductee Michael Johnson. As a BU sophomore, he won the NCAA indoor and outdoor titles in the 400 meters, followed by the USATF championship and a gold medal at the Athens Olympics in 44 seconds flat, shattering Johnson's school record. He turned pro after two years, four NCAA titles, and seven All-America designations, but continued to train at BU with coach and TSHOF inductee Clyde Hart. Wariner went on to win a gold medal in the 4x400 at the 2008 Beijing Olympics and silver in the 400, as well as 400-meter gold medals in the 2005 and '07 World Championships. His personal-best 43.45 in the latter makes him the third-fastest man ever behind Johnson (43.18) and Butch Reynolds (43.29), and through 2014 remained the fastest time in the world since Johnson set the mark in 1999. Wariner began his career at Arlington Lamar, where he was the Class 5A state champion in the 200 and 400 meters in 2002.
Name:  
Washington, Joe Jr.
City:  
Port Arthur, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Joe Washington Jr. rushed for 3,995 yards and was a two-time all-state running back for his father, Joe Washington Sr., at Port Arthur's Lincoln High School. With brother Ken at quarterback the Washingtons led Lincoln to an unbeaten regular season in 1971. Only 5'9 and 175 lbs., "Little Joe" played big for the Oklahoma Sooners. In 1974 and 1975 Washington earned All-America honors and led the Sooners to back to back National Championships. Although Washington only carried the ball 14.6 times per game, he averaged 6.1 yards per carry and set Oklahoma's all-time rushing record with 3,995 yards. From 1972-1975 he scored 53 career touchdowns and was named 1974 NCAA Player of the Year. Washington was drafted by the San Diego Chargers with the 4th pick in the 1976 draft. During his NFL career he rushed for 4,839 yards with San Diego (1976-77), Baltimore (1978-80), Washington (1981-84) and Atlanta (1985). He also caught 395 passes for 3,413 yards. He was voted to the 1979 Pro Bowl after rushing for 884 yards and setting a Colt's record with a league-high 82 catches for 750 yards. Washington was a member of the Washington Redskins' 1982 Super Bowl Champion team and is the only player in team history to lead the team in rushing and pass receiving in the same season. In 2002 he was named one of the 70 Greatest Redskins of All-Time.
Name:  
Wells, Willie
City:  
Austin
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Willie Wells was once called "the greatest living player not in the baseball hall of fame." He is a Negro League shortstop from Austin, Texas. Wells played in the Negro Leagues from the 1920s to the early 1940s and led the St. Louis Stars to three league titles. He also was a player-manager for the Chicago American Giants in the early 1930s and again in the 1940s for the Newark Eagles. Wells batted .368 and hit a league record 27 homeruns for the Stars in 1929. He played in eight All-Star games and finished his career with a batting a
Name:  
Welu, Billy
City:  
St. Louis, MO
School:  
Sport:  
Bowling
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Billy Welu of Houston was as well known for his outgoing personality as he was for his pin-striking abilities. His victories included the All-Star Title in 1959 and the ABC Masters Tournament in 1964 and 1965. He was a four-time All-American (1959, 1961, 1963 and 1964) and in 1967 Welu bowled a perfect 300 to win the Firestone Tournament of Champions. He twice captained the Falstaff team to American Bowling Congress titles. Welu also served as the color commentator for Chris Schenkal on ABC's Professional Bowlers Tour from 1962 until his death in 1974. In 1975 he was inducted into the American Bowling Congress Hall of Fame. Welu was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1996.
Name:  
White, Allie
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Allie White was voted by teammates the best all-round player on the 1938 Texas Christian University football squad. The Horned Frogs won the national championship with an 11-0-0 record while outscoring their opponents, 269-60. White was also a sophomore member of the 1936 TCU team which won the first Cotton Bowl Classic. He played one season with the Philadelphia Eagles before serving in the Navy. White returned to TCU in 1950 and served as an assistant coach until his retirement in 1970. An orphan at the age of nine, his high school days were spent at Masonic Home and School in Fort Worth. He played on undefeated, untied teams in 1931 and 1932 and earned all-state honors three times. White was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1994.
Name:  
White, Randy
City:  
Pittsburgh, PA
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
The first round draft choice of the Dallas Cowboys in 1975, Randy White played 14 seasons for the Cowboys (1975-1988) and was named All-Pro eight times. "The Manster" played in three Super Bowls with Dallas and along with Harvey Martin was named co-MVP of Super Bowl XII after the Cowboys defeated the Denver Broncos. White played collegiately at Maryland where he was an All-American and won the Outland Trophy and Lombardi Awards. In 1994 he was inducted into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor and the Pro Football Hall of Fame. White was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1996.
Name:  
Whitney, Arthur
City:  
San Antonio, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
San Antonio native Arthur "Pinky" Whitney was a third baseman in the major leagues from 1928-1939 with the Philadelphia Phillies and the Boston Braves. Whitney had a lifetime .295 batting average and a .964 career fielding percentage. Whitney was signed to a baseball contract in 1924 by the Cleveland Indians for $2,500. A clerical mistake by the Indians left Whitney unprotected and he was acquired by the Philadelphia Phillies. In 1937 he was selected to play in the All-Star Game and drove in two runs in a 4-3 National League victory. Whitney was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1983.
Name:  
Whitworth, Kathy
City:  
Monahans, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Kathy Whitworth was the first woman professional golfer to pass the $1 million mark in career earnings. She broke the million-dollar plateau in 1981 when, at the age of 41, she won her 81st tournament. Whitworth's dominance of the game cannot be fully measured by career earnings, however, since she began in the early days of the LPGA tour when purses were much smaller. Her performance over a nine-year period (1965-73) may never be matched. During that time she was the leading money-winner eight times, player of the year seven times, and holder of low scoring average seven times. Whitworth won at least one tournament a year for 17 consecutive years. She was twice named Athlete of the Year by the Associated Press and in 1975 became the seventh member of the LPGA Hall of Fame. Whitworth was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1982.
Name:  
Wilkinson, Laura
City:  
Spring, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Diving
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Laura Wilkinson is an Olympic gold medalist from Spring, Texas. She was the first American to win the Platform Dive event since 1964 and she did so with a broken foot by beating China's superpower diving team during the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney. Wilkinson is the only woman to win platform gold at each of the three major world championships, the World Championships (2004), World Cup (2004) and Olympics (2000). Wilkinson also won the 1998 Goodwill Games Platform Gold Medal. She owns 19 United States National Diving Titles, eight of which are in the synchronized event. Wilkinson owns more than 30 gold medals in national and international competition. While at the University of Texas she won two NCAA National Titles in 1997 and 1999 and earned eight All-American honors. She is the chairwoman and co-founder of the Laura Wilkinson Foundation and is a renowned inspirational speaker. Wilkinson was inducted into the hall of fame as part of the class of 2010.
Name:  
Williams, Dave
City:  
Commerce, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Golf
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Dave Williams built a golfing dynasty at the University of Houston during his 36 years as head coach. Williams coached 41 players who earned 66 All-America honors and his teams won a record 16 NCAA team championships including five straight from 1956-1960. Under Williams the Cougars won 14 conference championships, 340 Tournaments and produced eight NCAA individual champions. Williams coached many future tour professionals including: Phil Rodgers, Homero Blancas, Kermit Zarley, John Mahaffey, Bruce Lietzke, Keith Fergus, Bill Rodgers and Steve Elkington. Williams was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1983.
Name:  
Williams, James
City:  
Waco, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
James "Froggy" Williams began his football career at Waco High School. He starred on the 1945 co-championship team that tied with Highland Park 7-7 in front of 45,790 fans at the Cotton Bowl. Williams lettered four years at Rice (1946-1949) as offensive/defensive left end and kicker. As a freshman, he played on the 9-2 team that defeated Tennessee in the Orange Bowl. He was a consensus All-American and captained the 1949 Owls, who topped a 10-1 season with a Cotton Bowl victory over North Carolina. In that game, Williams scored a touchdown and kicked three extra points. Williams was named one of the 1950 Classic's outstanding players. The two-time All-SWC pick was also selected to the Cotton Bowl's All-Decade team for the 1950's. Williams was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1985.
Name:  
Williams, Joe
City:  
Seguin, Texas
School:  
Sport:  
Baseball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
2016
“Smokey” Joe Williams is widely recognized as one of baseball’s greatest pitchers, despite never throwing a single pitch in the major leagues. Williams was born in 1886 in Seguin, Texas and grew up to be an outstanding baseball player, but his path to major league baseball was blocked by the color barrier. Williams would have a 27-year career pitching in the Negro Leagues from 1905-1932. Although records are incomplete from that era, Williams is credited with a win-loss record of 41-3 in 1914. In 1930, at age 44, Williams struck out 27 Kansas City Monarchs over 12 innings helping his team to a 1-0 victory. Williams and famous Negro Leagues pitcher Satchel Paige only went head-to-head on one occasion resulting in a 1-0 victory for Williams. He is arguably the greatest pitcher in Negro League history ahead of Paige. Major baseball historian and statistician, Bill James, named Williams the 12th greatest pitcher of all time, regardless of league. Williams was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1999.
Name:  
Williams, Max
City:  
Avoca, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
A founder of professional basketball in Texas, Max Williams also displayed skills as a wizard of the hardwood. Williams was the first prep player in Texas history to make the all-state team three years in a row and is widely credited as the first player to use the behind-the-back dribble. During his prep career he led Avoca to a 44-1 record and made the all-tournament team in every tournament that Avoca entered. In 1955 he scored 1,264 points and led Avoca to the Class B state title over Big Sandy. He also earned MVP honors at the 1956 THSCA All-Star Game and made the All-American team. Williams left the high school ranks as the state's all-time leading scorer with 3,360 points, a record that stood for 10 years. Against even tougher competition Williams poured in 30 points for Texas squad in the annual Oil Bowl All-Star game. His sharp shooting continued at SMU where he made the All-SWC basketball team in 1960. Williams graduated as the Mustangs' third all-time scorer with 940 points. He later was the driving force behind the ABA's Dallas Chaparrals (later the San Antonio Spurs) and served as the team's General Manager from 1967-1972. Williams also served as Coach for parts of the 1971 and 1972 seasons. Williams is a member of the TSHOF Class of 2009.
Name:  
Williams, Ricky
City:  
San Diego, CA
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
San Diego, California native Ricky Williams wasn't born in Texas but he got here as fast as he could. His stellar football career as a running back at the University of Texas (1995-98) culminated with the sport's highest honor - the 1998 Heisman Trophy. Williams set 21 NCAA records and 46 University of Texas career records. Two of the biggest records that Williams set included 72 career rushing touchdowns and 6,279 career rushing yards. His brilliant senior campaign also included being named the 1998 AP Player of the Year and winning the Maxwell & Walter Camp Awards. The two-time All-American was also the first player to win the Doak Walker Award twice. Williams won back to back NCAA rushing titles his junior and senior seasons and was one of only three University of Texas running backs to rush for over 1,000 yards three years in a row. He was also named MVP of the 1999 Cotton & Hula Bowls. Williams played in the NFL from 1999-2011 with the New Orleans Saints, Miami Dolphins & Baltimore Ravens. Williams was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the Class of 2012.
Name:  
Williams, Stanley
City:  
School:  
Sport:  
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Stanley Williams began his illustrious career as an end at Cisco High School where he was selected to play in the Texas High School Coaches Association All Star Game as a senior. Williams continued catching passes at Baylor from 1949-1951 leading the Bears to a 23-7-1 record and three Top 20 finishes. His career totals include 65 receptions for 1,029 yards and 11 touchdowns. In 1951 he made the All-SWC and All-America teams and helped Baylor earn a berth in the 1952 Orange Bowl. Williams played one season for the 1952 Dallas Texans before the franchise moved to Baltimore and became the Colts. Williams then migrated north to play for the Saskatchewan Roughriders in the Canadian Football League. From 1953-1958 he played wide receiver and defensive back with the Roughriders. He made the All-Canadian Team in 1954 when he led the league with eight interceptions. Williams was also a two-time Western Conference All-Star selection. On October 4, 1996 he was inducted into the Saskatchewan Roughriders Plaza of Honor. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2003.
Name:  
Wilson, Bobby
City:  
Corsicana, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
During his days at Corsicana High School Bobby Wilson, a two-time All-State running back, led his team to the 1932 state championship. He continued his football career at SMU. In 1934 and 1935, Wilson led the Southwest Conference in scoring and was named to the All-America team both years. Wilson is best remembered for his spectacular touchdown catch that beat TCU and put SMU in the 1936 Rose Bowl, earning the national championship for the Mustangs. As a result Wilson was chosen to play in the College All-Star Game in Chicago. In 1936 Bobby Wilson played professional football for the Brooklyn Dodgers. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1969.
Name:  
Wisdom, W.J.
City:  
Pottsville, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Basketball
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Legendary basketball coach W.J. Wisdom coached at John Tarleton Junior College from 1922-1942. Under his guidance the Plowboys set a national record by winning 86 consecutive games. From 1930-1940 his teams lost only 10 games and during a span of 4 years they won 111 of 112. Wisdom's base offense was a single post with two forwards and weaving guards. His teams won or tied for 16 Central Texas Conference titles. Wisdom's teams were so successful at defeating larger four-year colleges that Southwest Conference schools declined to schedule the Plowboys. In 1972 Tarleton State University honored Wisdom by naming its new gymnasium in his honor. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1971.
Name:  
Wolcott, Fred
City:  
Snyder, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Track & Field
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Fred Wolcott's outstanding accomplishments earned him the reputation as Texas' greatest track and field performer for the first 50 years of the 20th Century. He broke world records seven times during the late 1930s and early 1940s and was the first man to hold world records in the high and low hurdles at the time. One of his best performances came in 1940 when he broke Jesse Owens' world record in the 220-yard low hurdles with a time of 22.6 seconds. The next year, he set the world record in the high hurdles with a time of 13.7 seconds. Wolcott never earned an Olympic medal since no Olympic games were held during World War II, but he did win seven National AAU titles, five NCAA championships, and 10 SWC individual gold medals. He was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1958.
Name:  
Wood, Gordon
City:  
Abilene, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Gordon Wood retired in 1985 as the winningest high school football coach in the country. During his 43 years as a high school coach, Wood compiled 396 victories, 91 defeats, 15 ties and nine state championships. Wood coached at seven high schools during his career (Rule, Roscoe, Seminole, Winters, Stamford, Victoria and Brownwood). He spent 26 years at Brownwood where he won seven state championships (1960, 1965, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1978 and 1981). Wood also won two state championships at Stamford in 1955 and 1956. In 1983 Wood was inducted into the National High School Sports Hall of Fame and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame.
Name:  
Woodson, Warren
City:  
Temple, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Warren Woodson was one of the most successful coaches in football history. His coaching stops included Texarkana Junior College, Arkansas State Teachers, Hardin-Simmons, Arizona, New Mexico State, Trinity, and New Mexico Highlands during 40 years (1927-1966). He is credited with inventing the Wing-T formation and six of his backfield players won a total of nine national rushing titles. By the end of his career, he was tied for fifth place among the all-time national total-victory leaders, behind such greats as Amos Alonzo Stagg and Paul "Bear" Bryant. Woodson led his teams to 10 bowl games where they compiled a 7-2-1 record. His teams also won a total of 11 championships and two co-titles. Woodson was honored as National Coach of the Year in 1960, and in 1977 he was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame.
Name:  
Worster, Steve
City:  
Bridge City, TX
School:  
Sport:  
Football
Varsity Years:  
Year of Induction:  
Steve Worster gained 5,422 rushing yards during his spectacular high school career at Bridge City (1964-1966). His senior season he rushed for 2,210 yards while carrying the Cardinals to the Class 3A state title. He was at his best in the 1966 state final, racking up 249 yards (a title-game record at the time) as Bridge City romped over unbeaten McKinney, 30-6. Worster, a bruising fullback, soon became the focal point of Darrell Royal's wishbone offense and earned All-America honors in 1969 & 1970. Worster saved some of his best running for the Cotton Bowl where he led the Longhorns to a 2-1 record. In the 1970 Cotton Bowl vs. Notre Dame Worster rushed for 155 yards helping Texas to a 21-17 victory. The "Big Woo" rushed for 2,353 yards and 36 career touchdowns as Texas won 30 consecutive games and a pair of national titles between 1968 and 1970. Worster was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2008.
Name:  
Wright, Rayfield
City:  
Griffin, GA
School:  
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Football
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One of the finest offensive tackles in NFL history, Rayfield Wright ruled the trenches for the Dallas Cowboys from 1967-1979. The 6'7, 250 pound "Big Cat" was selected to six consecutive Pro Bowls from 1972 to 1977 and was named All-Pro four times. He was also voted NFL Offensive Lineman of the Year in 1972 and 1974. Wright played college football at Fort Valley State in Georgia and was selected by the Cowboys in the 7th round of the 1967 NFL Draft. He anchored a Cowboy offensive line that led the NFL (NFC after 1969 AFL merger) in total yards gained in 1968, 1969, 1971, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1978 & 1979. In 13 seasons with the Cowboys he was a member of 12 playoff teams and played in five Super Bowls. The Cowboys defeated Miami in Super Bowl VI (24-3) and Denver in Super Bowl XII (27-10). A leader on and off the field, Wright served as a team Co-Captain for seven years. He became the first offensive lineman inducted into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor on October 10, 2004. He is a member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Class of 2004.
Name:  
Yeoman, Bill
City:  
Elnora, Indiana
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Football
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Bill Yeoman was the head football coach at the University of Houston football from 1962-1986. He invented the veer offense in 1964 and quickly led the Cougars to national prominence. Yeoman's "Houston Veer" gained more yards than any team in the nation from 1966-1968. On July 11, 1964, Yeoman broke the color barrier for major Texas football programs when the University of Houston signed San Antonio's Warren McVea to a scholarship. During his 25 year coaching career he compiled a record of 160-108-8. Yeoman guided the Cougars to 11 bowl games appearances including Cotton Bowl victories over Maryland in 1977 and Nebraska in 1980. He led the Cougars to four SWC titles: 1976, 1978, 1979 & 1984. In 1976, Houston's first year as a member of the SWC, Yeoman was named Texas Coach of the Year and runner-up for National Coach of the Year. He coached 46 All-Americans and 69 NFL players. Yeoman was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2001 and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2003.
Name:  
Zaharias, Mildred Didrikson
City:  
Port Arthur, TX
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Basketball, Track & Field, Golf
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Mildred "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias was voted Greatest Woman Athlete of the first half-century by the Associated Press. She excelled in many sports including track and field, basketball and golf. At the 1932 Women's AAU Olympic tryout meet she scored 30 points as a one woman team. The Illinois Women's Athletic Club, which had 22 members, finished second. She gained national attention at the 1932 Olympics when, as an 18 year old, she won gold medals in the 80-meter hurdles and javelin (setting Olympic records in both). She would have won a gold in the high jump but she was penalized for her technique and settled for silver. Babe was also an outstanding golfer, in 1946 and 1947 she won 17 amateur tournaments in a row. A founder and charter member of the LPGA she had 31 tour victories during her eight year career on the tour. She was also named AP Woman Athlete of the Year a record six times. Zaharias died in 1956 at age 43 of cancer. She was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1954.